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LIBRARY 

OF THE 




MASSACHUSETTS 

AGRICULTURAL 

COLLEGE 



Source. 



M. A. C. 

COI I FCTION 



r^ 



AGGIE LIFE. 



VOL. I. 



AMHERST, MASS., OCTOBER 1, 1890. 



No. 1 



WHERE DO YOU BUY m\ 

Meersclianm Pipes? 
French Briar Pipes? 
Clioice Tobacco? 
Sponges? 
Soap? 

Hair Brushes from 25 cts. up? 
Combs from 5 cts. up? 
Choice New York Coufectionery? 
Shaving Mugs? 
Shaving Soap? 
Lather Bruslies ? 

Cigarettes, fresh every two weelis? 
The Best Soda in America? 
The Best Bay Rum? 
Imported Perfumes? 
Prescriptions prepared by licensed pharmacists? 
Imported Domestic Tooth Brashes? 

If you liave not obtained these necessaries at 
DEUEL'S DRUG STORE, you have begun 
wrong. Deuel's is the leading Drug Store in 
Western Mass., and keeps the largest assort- 
ment of goods at bottom prices. 



D 



EUS DRU& STORE, 

Amtierst House Block, Aoilierst, Mass, 
HENRY ADAMS, 

PHARMACIST, 

so. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, - - AMHERST, MASS. 

Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORT- 
ED AND DOMESTIC CIGARS, 
CIGARETTES, ETC., 
MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, 
FISHING TACKLE AND SPORTING GOODS, 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, and Sporting 
and Springfield Rifles. 

Sunday and night calls responded to at resi- 
deuC2, first door west of Wood's Hotel. 

(brugs, Medicines, 

TOILET ARTICLES, 

CONFECTIONERY, CIGARS, CIGARETTES, 

AND SMOKERS' GOODS. 



rarszciASs' phescriptions came- 

AT 

6 PHCENIX ROW. 

Order your COi^l here. 



THE PROGRESS OF THE COLLEGE. 

Twenty-eight years have passed away 
since the original bill, having in view the 
establishment of Agricultural Colleges, in 
the various states of the Union ; received 
the approval of the President. Since that 
time great advances have been made in 
agricultural education. Each of the older 
states has some institution meeting the re- 
quirements of the Land Grant Act, and in 
many of them Agricultural Colleges are 
maintained on an independent basis. From 
small and imperfect beginnings these insti- 
tutions have risen to their present high 
state of efficiency. Public sentiment has 
gradually awakened to the need of just such 
colleges, for the education of our young 
men, and the appropriations for their sup- 
port have been constantly growing more 
generous. The movement of agricultural 
education has always been forward. Al- 
though it may have seemed at times to 
stand still, it has, nevertheless, soon start- 
ed forward again with renewed energy. 

But let us turn from the consideration of 
the progress of Agricultural Colleges in 
general to that of our own college. The 
M. A. C. has always stood among the first 
of agricultural institutions. It has been 
singularly fortunate in securing the best 
instructors, and has been favored from 
the start with an almost unbroken succes- 
sion of men eminently fitted for the duties 
which they have been called upon to dis- 
charge. Add to this a series of g(-nerous 
Legislatures, and we have the conditions 
best united to progress. 

When an alumnus of one of our first 
classes returns to college, after years of 
absence, he hardly knows the place. Every 
thing seems changed for the better, and 
his exclamations of delight and astonish- 
ment come thick and fast. New buildinas 

o 

have risen in the place of old ones, and 
those still remaining have been so changed 
and improved as to be scarcely recognizable 
New conveniences for study and experi- 
ment iiave been furnished ; the course of 
study has been improved ; and he sees on 
every hand evidences that., the spirit of 
progress has been actively at work. 

If the members of the Senior class will 
look back ov(«" the three years which have 
passed since ',hey entered college, in the 



fall of '87, they too may see that great 
changes have come about. Indeed we do 
not think that there have ever been, since 
the foundation of the college, three years 
of such steady and rapid progress as these 
have been. 

The course of study has been greatly 
altered for the better. Some studies have 
been dropped ; the time devoted to some 
has been reduced ; and others of greater 
practical importance have been substituted. 
Within the past year two new Professor- 
ships have been established. The chair of 
Veterinary Science is filled by James B. 
Paige, a graduate of this college and also 
of the Montreal Veterinary College. The 
instruction in this department consists of a 
series of lectures, extending throughout the 
Senior year, on all the more important por- 
tions of Veterinary science. The aim is 
not to make the students veterinary practi- 
tioners, but to teach them how to house and 
care for their animals, and how to diagnose 
and treat some of the simpler diseases to 
which domestic animals are subject. What- 
ever calling we may pursue there will come 
a time in the lives of all of us when the 
knowledge thus acquired will be of the 
greatest value. The establishment of this 
chair is a step in the right direction and 
one which will call forth the hearty com- 
mendation of all friends of the college. 

Prof. Mills, formerly prmcipal of Gray- 
lock Academy, now HUs the Professorship 
in the English department. He has charge 
of the work of the three lower classes in 
declamation and composition, which was 
formerly divided among several Professors. 
The superiority of this arrangement is 
oljvious, and its beneficial effects have been 
very apparent during the past year. Prof. 
Mills also instructs the Freshman class in 
Latin, thus relieving President GoodeJl of 
a portion of his arduous duties. 

Laboratory work in botany and zoology, 
is another recent feature of the course. 
The need of such instruction has been felt 
for some time, but it has only recently been 
found practicable to give it. No matter 
how good a theoretical knowledge a man 
may have of a subject, he cannot be said 
to understand that sul)ject unless he also 
has a practical knowledge of it, and this is 
just what laboratory work gives. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



During the past three years a number of 
buildings have been erected on various 
parts of the college grounds, and the old 
ones have all been thoroughly repaired. 
The equipment of the scientific department 
is constantly being improved, and they are 
at present in a high state of efficiency. 

In view of the generous appropriation 
recently made by the U. !S. government, in 
favor of Agricultural Colleges, we may 
fairly look forward to a long period of in- 
creased activity and usefulness. In fact, 
the prospects of the college were never 
better. With a good Faculty ; generous 
support from the public ; and a good class 
of students, it would indeed be strange if 
we did not succeed. Under such circum- 
stances there is certainly nothing to prevent 
us from maintaining the high rank among 
Agricultural Colleges which we have always 
held. 



SPORTS. 

Thus far this year the tide of popular 
opinion in Aggie has taken a more favora- 
ble turn in regard to sports than it did last 
fall. The foot-ball men having begun 
training in good season, we hope to have a 
team that will be able to compete success- 
fully with colleges of acknowledged stand- 
ing in the athletic world. The way in 
which the students as a whole have met the 
subscription list is decidedly satisfactory. 
If now the men who come out on the cam- 
pus in the latter part of the afternoon and 
pass and kick the ball would come out an 
hour earlier and place themselves at the 
disposal of the captains they would get far 
better exercise, as well as tend to materially 
raise the standard of the team. As for the 
team themselves, abstinence at table, early 
hours and constant practice ai-e prime es- 
sentials to strength, length of wind, and 
hardy endurance. 

Our hase-ball record of last spring was 
nothing to be ashamed of. We won six 
games out of ten, and feel confident that 
we should have won a seventh if our oppon- 
ents had confined their efforts to playing 
ball and had not attempted an amateur 
concert. 

As for general athletics we have never 
done much in this line, but this year the 
men who were most desirous of having a 
field-day were elected to offices on the Ath- 
letic Board, and it is hoped that the college 
will witness an out-door athletic meet in 
the spring. There are men in college 
whose base running sometimes surprises 
other teams, so the hundred yards dash is 



likely to be well contested. If the fellows 
will only practice in the Gym. regularly 
during the winter their showing will be 
more creditable in the spring, and we do 
not believe that lessons need suffer one 
whit on account of it. 

A very pleasing fact to all of us is the 
different ground the Faculty have taken 
this year, as compared with last, in regard 
to foot ball. Then they refused to give 
the team any financial or moral support, 
although they did not forbid the game, but 
this year the foot-ball treasurer has re" 
ceived several encouraging subscriptions 
from the Faculty. Let us hope that this 
change of aspect will lead to a clearer un- 
derstanding and more sympathy between 
students and Facultv. 



THE SUBSCRIPTION FIENDS, 
OR An Aggie Student's Dream. 

One night not long ago, as I was medi- 
tating upon the infinitesimal minuteness of 
zero, and the awful magnitude of infinity, 
I fell asleep and dreamed. 

A id in my dream I saw a great number 
of young men coming towards me. bearing 
parchments in their hands and having their 
faces wreathed ill tlie most heavenly smiles. 

As I stood gazing at their beautiful coun- 
tenances one of them out-stripped the others 
and approached me. With a most gracious 
bow he introduced himself as the represen- 
tative of a tribe called "Foot-ball," and 
quickly began to converse upon the weath- 
er and to compliment me upon my personal 
appearance and my beautiful surroundings 
in such a manner that I became greatly 
fascinated with him. 

And as we talked he told me of the won- 
ders of his craft, and how in a war with a 
tribe of savages called AVillistons, his clan 
had come out victorious. 

And he told me how, in order to main- 
tain the supremacy which they had gained, 
and moreover to accomplish other victories, 
they needed the aid of such fine men as I. 

And as we talked he unrolled the parch- 
ment which he carried, and in a trice I had 
placed my name upon it, under his fascin- 
ating gaze. 

And in my dream I then saw him inscribe 
a signaftermy name resembling this($3. 50) 
the meaning of which I did not then under, 
stand. And behold, as I looked he had 
vanished. 

While I was pondering this in my mind, 
a second young man advanced after the 
manner of the first, saying his name was 
Class Tax, and he had be';n sent by the 



ruler of his province to get aid. 

And he told me how they had won many 
mighty wars, (tug of war), and how their 
wise men had written manj' sheets of parch- 
ment, and that because of all these achieve- 
ments, they had been unable to meet their 
creditors who demanded satisfaction. 

After the manner of the first he unrolled 
his parchment and again I wrote my name, 
and again my visitor had vanished. 

In this waly came and went the assembly 
of young men, each pleading his own cause 
with a dettness and a subtle power that 
was irresistable to me. At last I awoke. 

Again I fell asleep and dreamed. And 
in my dream I saw a great number of hid- 
eous looking beings, armed with spears 
and ropes and tweezers. Upon looking 
closer I perceived that they were the same 
men whom I saw in my first dream, and 
that they still bore the parchments, but I 
marvelled much attheir changed appearance. 

And, as in my first dream, one of their 
number came towards me holding out his 
parchment, and demanded gruffly his pay. 

At length I made out that he wanted 
money, and with a heavy heart I gave him 
half of what I had. With a gruff farewell 
he departed. 

Immediately a second approached and 
demanded his portion. I reluctantly gave 
him nearly all I had left, but he with an 
oath sprang at me with his tweezers and 
proceeded to extricate from my uuwilliug 
grasp all that remained. 

He then left me and a third approached. 
With many brandishes of his spear he 
sought his due. I tried to tell him I had 
nothing for him, but to no purpose. I en- 
treated him ; he fell upon me and bound 
me with his rope and searched me over and 
over. When he found his search useless, 
he gave me a parting cut and went back to 
his comrades, who seemed disinclined to 
molest me. 

I lay for a long time nearly dead, fearing 
every moment the return of some of the 
fiends. 

At last I summoned all my strength in 
an endeavor to break my bands, and in 
the effort, — awoke. 

And behold all this also was but a dream. 
Moral. Beware of the smooth toiiwued 
flatterers who solicit your aid, for they will 
turn again to rend you. 



YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCI- 
ATION. 

It is not without a slight touch of pride 
that we speak of the Y. M. C. A. as an 



AGGIE LIFE. 



association which is holding well its place 
aud one that has taken as great a step in 
the general advancement and improvement 
of the college this year, as any connected 
with it. Since its org;inization in 1886, 
from the old College Christian Union, there 
has been a steady growth both in numbers 
and the amount of work undertaken. 

We now have in the three upper classes 
nineteen active members and tweutj'-one 
associate mem))ers, and from statistics 
taken by the membership committee we 
learn there are nearly one-third of the 
Freshmen eligible to active membership. 

The regular prayer meetings held Sunday 
afternoons at 4-45 aud on Thursday even- 
ings at 7 o'clock have been thus far well 
attended, still we are looking for an in- 
creased attendance as soon as college set- 
tles down to its regular work. 

The Bible-class under the leadership of 
Prof. Mills is exceedingly interesting, in- 
structive, and very well attended. We 
wish that all the students who read this 
short article would come and see for them- 
selves : one visit ; we are sure would lead 
them to come again. It is now held at 9- 
15 in the morning instead of directly after 
services as formerly. There are two very 
enthusiastic Bible-training classes, of about 
lifteeu members each, which meet weekly, 
one at No. 5 N. C, the other at No. 15 S. 
C. They are now taking up a course in 
practical personal work as designed by C. 
K. Ober and J. R. Mott. Their motive is 
to fit themselves better for aggressive 
christian work. 

The interest started last spring by R. E. 
Speer of Princeton in the Student Volun- 
teer Movement aud Foreign Missions has 
been well kept up this fall. We are now 
aiding a native student in a theological 
seminary in Japan. As this is a new de- 
parture for us much interest is manifested 
in the result. Desiring to put the money 
raised where the contributors could hear 
from it, we chose this form with the under- 
standing that the man helped shall write to 
the association so that its members will 
have a personal interest whi'-h they could 
not have if their money was sent with other 
sums to carry (nit some large project re- 
quiring thousands of dollars. At the be- 
ginning of the term the Association issued 
a neat little hand-book. 



IN MEMORIAM. 
In Memory of our Classmate, 

David Pieuce Harvey, 

WIw died September 2G, 1890. 

WJiereas,--lt has pleased God in His 

infinite wisdom to remove from our midst 

our beloved friend and classmate David P. 

Harvey, and 

Whereas, — We recognize in him one who, 
as a student, was esteemed and respected 
by all. His buoyant spirit and cheerful 
countenance ever commanded our admira- 
tion. Therefore be it 

Resolved, — That we mouru his loss, and 
that we extend our heartfelt sympathy to 
his bereaved parents in their affliction ; and 
be it further 

Resolved, — That a copy of these resolu- 
tions be sent to his parents and also be 
published in Aggie Life. 

W. S. Pembee, ■) 

J. Baker, V Committee. 

B. Sedgwick, ) 



Whereas, — it has pleased our all-wise 
Father to remove from our earthly sight our 
friend aud brother, David Pierce Harvey, 
beloved by us all, we bow and submit. 
But be it 

Eesolved, — that his helpful word and 
cheering smile will ever be remembered iu 
the fraternity that he loved ; and'be it further 

Resolved, — that we the Pi chapter of the 
Phi Sigma Kappa Frateruity do extend a 
sympathizing hand to the bereaved parents, 
mourning with them iu their grief ; and he 
it furtlier 

Resolved,— that a copy of these resolu- 
tions be sent to the parents of the deceased, 
a copy placed on the frateruity records and 
also published in the college publication. 
Aldice G. Fames, ") Committee 
Geo. B. Willard, V for the 
L. W. Smith, ) Society. 



E. C. Howard, a graduate of Wesleyan 
Academy has entered '93 this term. He 
will be a strong addition to both foot-ball 
and base-ball teams. 



Youth and the opening rose 

May look like things too glorious for decay, 
And smile at thee — but thou art not of those 

That wait the ripened bloom to seize their prey. 

Leaves have their time to fall, 

And flowers to wither at the north wind 's breath, 
And stars to set — but all, 

Thou hast all seasons for thine own, Death ! 



THE OBSERVING MAN. 
The habit of exactness in observation is 
slowly acquired, and has been manifested 
in the highest degree in but few instances. 
The observing man, however, has in all 
ages been the most useful to mankind. 



Whether his forte was in literature, art or 
science, he found something to perceive 
and therefore had something to give. 

The observing man of to-day sees more 
than those things pertaining simply to his 
occupation. Tliough extremely attentive 
in that direction, his observation is exten- 
sive ; he sees other lines of work and is con- 
scious that they exist. 

If he should confine his observation sim- 
ply to his own calling, social life wonld 
become a burden to him and his conversa- 
tion but a review of his business. The man 
who sees as he goes through life always has 
a ready tongue and an interesting subject 
for conversation. He carries with him a 
whole company, entertaining all Ijy his 
happy observations. 

There is a wide difference in the power 
of observation in different persons. One 
man in going through a city once sees more 
than another in going over the same route 
a dozen times. Some persons iu travelling 
over the same road daily see something new 
each time ; the observing powers are 
strengthened. Others liaving traveled the 
road once think they have seen all and do 
not keep the observing powers active, 
therefore they are weakened and become 
more and more dormant. 

In whatever business a man engages, his 
services will be valuable in proportion to 
the extent of his observation. The man 
who can see what ought to be done and 
does it without being told, is much more 
valuable than the willing man who has to 
be directed in all his work. The observing 
business man is never idle ; he always has 
something to do. His conversation is 
weighty and interesting, carrying with it 
conviction. 

To the young man just taking up a sci- 
entific course of study, no one thing can be 
more useful than a habit of keen observa- 
tion. If -he learns to observe accurately, 
he will be able to see more plainly the rela- 
tions which give rise to the laws of science. 
He will see reason in everything. He will 
be ou the alert for new objects and see new 
[joints in old ones. He will learn to make 
himself useful to others through his powers 
of observation. His mind will be filled 
with objects for reflection, and the thought 
of being useful will make him happy. 



The M. A. C. boarding club has enlarged 
its membership from forty-two to sixty and 
still has more applicants than it can accom- 
date. The other boarding houses are full 
to overflowing. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Publishecl Fortnightly by tlie Students of the 
Mass. Agricultural College. 



Terms $1,00 per year, in advance. 



Single copies, 10c. 



BOAMD OF EDITOItS: 

E. P. FELT, Editor-in-Chiet, 
O. Y. B. LAGE, Business Manager, 
A. G. EAMES, '91, H. N. LEGATE, '91, 

3. L. FIELD, '92, G. E. TAYLOR, '92, 

G. r. C0ELEY, '93. 

Address all communications to tlie Business Manager. 



As Aggie Life appears for the first time, 
we would make a low bow and assure our 
readers that we shall follow our customary 
policy, but unfortunately our predecessors 
left us no policy, not even a second hand 
insurance policy, therefore we must take 
our own risk, and state that Aggie Life 
aims to represent the college impartially 
and advance its best interests. To accom- 
plish this, we shall record all matters of 
general interest concerning the college and 
the Alumni, and will endeavor to keep up 
a lively interest in all forms of literary 
work. 



make it a paper well worthy of M. A. C. 



The college now has an excellent way to 
express itself every two weeks. There is 
room enough in tliis paper for all to air 
their opinions; if not we will make room, 
but we do not purpose to waste room. 
This paper cannot afford to pulilish long, 
diffuse articles simply to 911 up, but it can 
and will publish all obtainable articles that 
are pointed, lively and full of interest. 
The production of such articles requires 
thought and study before writing ; it is 
comparativelj' easy for a writer to have, 
what he thinks, is an inspiration, but the 
test is, will his reader agree with him. 
This paper wants articles the inspiration 
of which is apparent to the reader as well 
as to the writer. Articles must be handed 
to the Editor-in-Chief one week before that 
issue of the paper, in which insertion is 
desired. 



As this sheet comes into the hands of its 
readers, they may ask the question, "what 
is the need of so many papers ? they tell us 
little that is new and they certainlj' are not 
profitable, while the literary merit of the 
paper does not rank above the average." 
The answer is this ; that as the college 
grows and expands, things that first ap- 
peared as impossible, became practical, 
and finally are necessary. Other colleges 
have their weeklies and even dailies and 
find them necessary. Our college has 
long wanted a paper ; it became a need 
years ago and was demanded this fall. 
Your attention is invited to this paper as a 
result of this demand. 



As a college paper Aggie Life must 
represent the college fairly ; to attain this 
end, the students must be loyal to their 
paper, and support it, as they have started 
it, liberally. Not only must the paper 
have moral support, but the subscription 
list must be exteudefl, and besides this 
every one of the one-hundred and twenty 
editors, (or the whole college) must do his 
part in a literarv way. True it is, that 
seven men have been appointed IVom the 
one-hundred and twenty to serve as an 
Editorial Board, but the fnct still remain.s 
that the paper is published by the college, 
therefore, the college must support it and 



As Aggie Life comes into the hands of 
each graduate, we ask you to review the 
old college days, when you worked so hard 
in foot-ball and base-ball to keep up the 
college honor. You remember talking over 
the needs and possibilities of Aggie and 
how you used to prophesy of the future in 
store for her. Among other things that 
demanded your attention at such times was 
the need there was of a paper ; at that time 
it was hardly advisable to undertake any 
such project, but now we have responded 
to the call and started this paper. The 
college started it well and now gives it 
hearty support, but for continual success 
we must enlarge our field of work and look 
to the Alumni for similar support. Every 
Alumnus is expected to subscribe and not 
to stop there, but to be ever ready to help 
by furnishing suggestions, news and other 
articles of interest. 

The Board of Editors owe the college a 
debt of gratitude for the hearty support 
we have received in starting this paper, 
and we hope to make it worthy of the col- 
lege and prove ourselves worthy of the trust 
imposed upon us. To our advertisers and 
friends we would extend our sincere thanks 
for their liberality, which has so materially 
aided us in our undertaking, and as editors 
we feel bound to make the paper as great a 
success as lies within our power. 



place. It is your own jn'operty and you 
should, one and all, resent any damage 
done to the apparatus in a spirit of mis- 
chief. Do not pile fifteen or twenty pounds 
of weights on the smaller chest weights ; the 
larger machines are for those who wish to 
test their lifting capacity. In a word, use 
all things properly and report promptly any 
damage done to the treasurer of the Ath- 
letic Board, that it may be remedied as 
soon as feasible. 



To all our friends and Alumni we send 
this first issue of Aggie Life as a sample 
copy. We expect all to subscribe at once. 



There have been the usual number of 
rushes so far this term, with the usual 
results. Both classes claim the victory, 
the upper classes, of course, side with their 
proteges, and the impartial spectator is 
very apt to consider them as drawn con- 
tests. The most decisive one thus far, 
occurred when the Freshmen took away the 
rope, with which a dozen Sophomores were 
practicing for the rope-pull. This could 
not, however, be considered as a fair test 
of the relative strength of the two classes, 
as it was a case of the greater part of one 
class being pitted against a very small 
portion of another. These rushes are in 
no way decisive, and it would benefit all 
concerned if they were dropped. 



Just here a few words in regard to the 
care of the Gymnasium may not be out of 



Orders have been issued by Lieut. Cor- 
nish, changing the military uniform from 
gray to blue with white trimmings. This 
change gives us a neater and a moi'e hand- 
some uniform than the old one, which very 
much resembles the uniform worn by in- 
mates of the various Reform tichools. Not 
only will it look better, but instead of the 
blouse there will be the regular army coat, 
which is easier to drill in and besides this 
it does away with the expensive dress coat 
that was hardly ever worn and was always 
in the way. This change will come rather 
hard on the upper classes, especially the 
Seniors, who are obliged to purchase new 
uniforms, which they can wear only two 
terms. But all changes result in loss to 
some one, though it seems hard now, we 
have, at least, the satisfaction of knowino- 
that the battalion will never look better 
than it will in the coming two terms, when 
all will be in new uniform. 



P-g-e, in Agriculture, who has a blank 
half page in his note book, he wants to fill, 
asks for some general remarks, to fill up. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



GLEANINGS. 

J. B. Briae is making the new uniforms. 

Sept. 18 Farm Supt. Cooley began filling 
the two silos, which work was completed 
ou the 24th. 

New mortared and papered rooms, and 
additional bathing facilities are among the 
summer's improvements. 

A. R. Streeter, '94, has begun the cob- 
bler's business by which he expects to 
make his way through college. Boys, 
pationize him. 

The Seniors start for West Point to-day. 
Pres. Goodell offers a prize of $20 for the 
best written account- of the trip. Lieut. 
Cornish to be judge. 

The rope-pull we heard so much about 
has fallen through for the present. Nine- 
ty-four, it seems, backed down at the last 
moment, it is better to lose than to back 
out. 

The Senior and Junior privates are hav- 
ing target practice. The highest score 
being n;ade by Graham, '92, 21 out of a 
possible 25. Lowest 00000. Sophs, light 
artillery. Freshmen have their guns. 

Late on the evening of the 23d inst. a 
couple of worthies were espied by onr 
"sprinter" in the vineyard. After being 
hotly pursued a short distance, they drop- 
ped their booty and fled to parts unknown. 

Rev. C. H. Tindell of Portland, Me., 
supplied the M. A. C. pulpit last Sunday. 
His text being "If ye know this thing, 
happy are ye if ye do them." He dwelt on 
the doing as being a source of spontaneous 
happiness. 

The interest in mission work is very good 
this year. The Y. M. C. A. has raised by 
subscription $59.36, of which $45.00 is al- 
ready collected and forwarded to aid a 
poor theological student in Japan. The 
Y. M. C. A. expects to hear from the man 
occasionally. 

About every Freshman was at the Y. M. 
C. A. reception held at Dr. Walker's house 
on Friday evening, Sept. ] 9th. After an 
hour of social conversation refreshments 
were served. The event was a success in 
the highest degree. It would be better if 
students and Faculty met oftener in a social 
way. 

W. H. Rauney, '93, severed a vein in his 
wrist last Saturday morning, with a large 
knife, the cut bled very freely. Lieut. 
Cornish took him to Dr. P'ish, running his 
horse all the way and thus exciting all the 
small boys. The patient is doing well, 



and was neither shot or murdered as rumor 
reported. 

David P. Harvey, '93, died at his home 
at Townsend Harbor, Sept. 26th. The 
funeral was held at 3-30 p. m., Sunday, 
the 28th, at the Cong'l church at Townsend 
Center, of which he was a memlier. Hen- 
derson, '93, delegated to represent his 
class, and Fames, '91, and L. W. Smith, 
'63, to represent his fraternity, attended 
the funeral, and with three of Harvey's 
friends in Townsend acted as pall-bearers. 

The W. I. L. S. held its first meeting of 
the year last Friday night and elected the 
following officers: Pres., H. M. Howard, 
'91 ; Vice-Pres., H. M. Thomson, '92 ; Sec, 
A. E. IVIelendy, '93; Treas., W. H. Ran- 
ney. '93 ; 1st Director, M. Ruggles, '91 ; 
2d Director, F. G. Stockbridge, '92 ; 3d 
Director, F. A. Smith, '93. Every man 
should attend these meetings and give 
them his heartiest support. The training 
received there is invaluable to any man. 
Therefore come prepared to speak on the 
question every time and thus benefit your- 
self and the society. 

On Sept. 23d, Prof. Maynard took the 
Sophomore class ou a botanizing trip to 
Sugar-loaf. They ascended the mountain, 
viewed the beautiful scenery for which this 
place is noted, and after an hour had been 
thus occupied they descended, some of 
them finding quite rare botanical gems. 
About 2 p. M. the boys started on their 
homeward journey, when the Professor 
showed his usual generosity b}' giving them 
all the watermelons and muskmelons they 
were capable of eating, which proved to be 
a large amount in most eases. About 4 p. 
M. they arrived at the college and after 
giving the class yell several times, and ex- 
tending to Prof. Maynard a vote of thanks ; 
they went to their rooms all agreeing that 
they had spent a most profitable and enjoy- 
able day. 

The prizes for the best fulfillment of the 
Sophomore experiments were awarded to 
the Senior class by Prof. Brooks, Sept. 29. 
The whole amount of the income from the 
plots was $106.66, of which $30 was set 
apart for three prizes, of $15, $10 and $5, 
respectively. The first prize was awarded 
to Brown, the second to Field and the third 
to Felt; the residue, $76.66, was to have 
been divided equally among the members 
of the class, but, accoi'ding to a previous 
agreement of that body, the whole sum of 
$106.66 is to be divided equally among the 
class to defray the expenses of the trip to 
West Point, minus $3.83 apiece, — the share 



due each man irrespective of prize-awards, 
to Belden, Phillips and Tuttle, who com- 
pleted their experiments before leavino- 
college. 

By chance we secured a Freshman's let- 
ter home from which we publish a few 
extracts : 

Deak Mother : — We have to keep reg- 
ular hours as we must have our lights out 
by nine o'clock. My clock stopped one 
night and the next "thing I knew I heard 
the janitor yell "lights out." I blew mine 
out and went to bed in the dark. Now I 
go to bed about half-past eight. I am too 
sleepy to sit up and study. 

The Sophomores are very rough, they 
won't let us carry canes and one day they 
stacked my room. I am going to keep in 
my room nights now, because the Sophs, 
say they will initate me in the Owl Club 
and put me in the fountain. 
Your son, 



Dr. W-lk-r toW-U-rd, who is examining 
the inside of his cap. Rhetoric and ento- 
mology don't go well together. 

Trinity 30 — Aggie 0. 

The first game of the season has been 
played and lost. Still we need not be dis- 
couraged on this account for the whole 
story of the game is summed up in the 
words "beef did it." Our boys worked 
hard and put up a strong game, but were 
obliged to secumb to the superior weight 
of their opponents. They tackled strongly 
but the rush line did not hold as it should, 
and the blocking of the backs was not of 
the first class-order. The Aggie men all 
played a clean, gentlemanly game through- 
out and though often receiving severe 
provocation did hot descend into slugging. 
The fact that two Trinity men were dis- 
qualified, renders further comment upon 
their style of play unnecessary. We can- 
not, however, refrain from saying a word 
in regard to K. Hubbard. He fairly earned 
the unenviable reputation of being the most 
ungentlemanly player ever seen on our 
campus. Teams having games to play 
with Trinity will do well to keep an eye on 
him. The teams lined up as follows : 

Aggie : Howard '93, r. e. ; Howard '91, 
r.t. ; Graham, r.g. ; Legate, c. ; Ruggles, 
l.g. ; Crane, l.t. ; Carpenter, I.e. ; Fletcher, 
quarterback; Hull, (Capt.) and Parker, 
half-backs ; Star, full-back. 

Trinity : Morris, r.e. ; L. Hubbard, r.t. ; 
Hoisiugton, r.g. ; Hartley, c. ; Young, l.g. ; 
K. Hubbard, l.t. ; Allen, I.e. ; Weeks, 
quarter-back; Hull (Capt.) and Thurston, 
half-backs ; Graves, full-back. 

Allen disqualified, substituted by Woffen- 



AGGIE LIFE. 



C, H, SANDERSON & CO,, 



CASH DEALERS IN 



Hats, Caps, Umbrellas, and Gents' 
Furnishing Goods. 



CASH ROW, 



AMHERST. 



SylNDEptt k THOMPSOf(, 



CASH DEALERS IN 



Dry and Fancy Goods, 

HOSIERY, RIBBONS, AND SMALL 
WARES OF ALL KINDS. 



AMHERST, MASS. 



BOOTS#SHOKS 

FOR EVERYBODY. 



A FINE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, 
BALS. AND CONGRESS. 

A FULL LLN"E OF 

liXJBBEK- C3-003I)S, 

FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 

Repairing Done Promptly. 

T. W. SLOAN, 
« psasxix ROW. 



S. J, SULLIVAN, 

DEALER IN 

Second-Hand Clothes 



FUEWITUEE. 

Orders promptly attended to..,^ 
AMHERST, MASS. 



deu ; K. Hubbard disqualified, substituted 
by Strong. Referee, Hill of Trinity ; Um- 
pire, Willard of M. A. C. 

Lack of space prevents us from giving a 
detailed account of the game, but the main 
features were as follows : In the first half, 
Trinity by bunt-rushes, interspersed with 
fine runs b}' Hall and Graves enabled Trin- 
ity to make three touch-downs from, off 
which, a goal was kicked. Trinity, 16; 
Aggie, 0. In the second half, they followed 
much the same line of plaj- and two touch- 
downs with a goal resulting from each and 
a safety raised their score to 30. Aggie 
was again unable to score. For Aggie, 
Howard '93, and Carpenter tackled finely, 
while Hull did some good spurting. For 
Trinity, Hall, Graves and L. Hubbard did 
exceptionally fine work. 



'94. 

Although rumors were currentthrough the 
summer that a large Freshman class might' 
be expected this fall, nearly every one was 
surprised when sixty men presented them- 
selves for instruction. Only once in the 
history of the college has so large a class 
entered, but we expect, in a few years, to 
see three and even five times that number 
enter. 

The class taken as a whole is a mild in- 
offensive collection of youths of medium 
size and not altogether bad looking ; of all 
ages from those easily able to support a 
full beard, down to those who ought not 
to be out of knee pants. Coming, as they 
do, from all over this section of the country, 
their paternal ancestors represent nearly 
every calling in life from that of college 
professors and presidents to the more hum- 
ble, but perhaps not less worthy, occupa- 
tion of tillers of the soil. The class as a 
whole will doubtless prove a valuable ac- 
quisition to the college. It may he a little 
early to predict what the s tanding of the 
class will be in athletics and sports, 3'et the 
indications are certainly auspicious. The 
class was certainly very fortunate in secur- 
ing one of the relatives of the distinguished 
John L. Sullivan as captain, who will 
doubtless impart much valuable iuforma- 
tiou in a pugilistic line. There seems to 
be considerable talent in the way of foot- 
ball and base-ball in the class, and we ex- 
pect them to supplj' some good material 
for the college teams. 

Aggie Life would recommend to the 
class the various societies in college, all of 
them have their good points, but we would 
caution the Freshmen in regard to joining. 
Don't be in a hurry, be sure you know every 



*' 




w' 



Busmess is business FRANK WOOD will get up 
Spre.aas for the Boys this -n-inter. Seud your orders 
right along to get there first. 



M. A. C. STUDENTS SHOULD GO TO 



BLODSETT ^ 0LftI{K 

EOR THEIR 

>0LOTHII]&< 



AND 



GENTS FURNISHING GOODS, 



Laundry Agency also. 



JOHN MULLEN, 



-DEALER IN- 



MEATS and PROVISIONS, 

VEGETABLES OE ALL KINDS IN SEASON, 

FISH AJST) OYSTERS, FOREIGN 

AND DOMESTIC FRUITS, • 

AND CANNED 

GOODS. 

Palmer's Block. Main Street. 



E. R. BENNETT, 
Jeweler, 

Optician, 

Watchmaker. 

FINE GOODS! LOW PRICES! 

GOOD WORK WARRANTED. 

First Door from Post Office. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



cJ 





COLLEGE TAILOR, 



Successor to F, H, Buddiii & Co,, Aiiilierst Tailors 



man in the society, wlucli you propose to 
join, and that they are the men with whom 
you wish to associate during Ufe, and then, 
go ahead. The Washington Irving Liter- 
ary Society should command the attention 
of every Freshman. The training that 
you may receive there is invaUiable to any 
man. 

The Y. M. C. A., while mentioned last, 
should stand first in your estimation ; let 
every man resolve to give it his best efforts. 
Class of '94 we welcome you to Aggie. 
We are glad that you have selected this in- 
stitution as a worthy place to fit for life's 
battle, and our advice is, first keep on the 
right side of the Faculty and secondly sub- 
scribe and write for AaaiE Life, and re- 
nown will be yours. 



Fall and Winter Suiting, 
Winter Oferceats to leasure, 

ORDERS TAKEN FOR SUITS AND 

OVERCOATS, FULL DRESS 

SUITS TO ORDER, 



GENTS' FURNISHING DEPARTMENT, 
COLLARS, CUFFS and TIES, 
SUSPENDERS >ND UNDERWEAR. 

Foot-Ball and Gpnasiuiii Goods. 



J. B. BmNE, 



Merchants' Row, 



AiVlHERST, MASS. 



SELF-MASTERY. 

Self-control is an essential preliminary to 
the mastery of one's fellows in any sphere 
of life. He who would control others must 
first control himself. The parent, the 
teacher, the employer, who attempts to 
govern those who are under him without 
fullj- governing himself is a failure from the 
start ; and this is why there are so many 
children, scholars and servants who cannot 
be governed. 

Every time the employer or teacher loses 
his self-control in the presence of those 
over whom he has been placed he loses con- 
trol of them, and the pupils have less re- 
spect for the instructor. The student and 
the laborer have a right to expect that 
their instructors will practice what they 
preach. 

For the captain to command the private 
to stand erect, to keep hands out of pockets 
aud never while on drill to occupy any but a 
military position ; and then let the private see 
the captain with blouse unbuttoned, hands 
in his pockets ; destroys his entire influence 
over that private. We are told to put onr- 
self in their place, this we do and we can- 
not justify any teacher, or emplo}'er in los- 
ing their temper in the presence of those 
over whom they have control. 



Y. M. C. A. 



PRAYER MEETINGS. 

Oct. 2 The Christians' Home. John 14 : 

1-4, Luke 12 : 33. W. H. Ranney. 
Oct. 5. Fishers of Men. Luke 5: 1-11. F. 

H. Henderson. 
Oct. 9. Seeking Wisdom. Prov. 2:1-9; 

3 : 13-20. G. E. Taylor. 
Oct. 12. Abounding in Love. Phil. 1 : 9-10 

I. Thes. 3 : 12. H. M. Howard. 



MAILS. 
Mail leaves college for P. 0. at 1 p. m. 
and 7 p. m. on week days. On Sunday it 
leaves at 4-45 p. m. At the P. 0. mails 
close as follows : 

Boston, 

7-45, 8-30, 10-15 a.m. ; 4-00, 6-45, 7-45 p.m. 

New York, Western and Southern States, 

7-45, 10-15 A. M. ; 4-00, 6-45, 7-45 p. m. 

Northampton, Springfield and Western 

Massachusetts, 

7-20, 10-15, 10-45 A. M. ; 6-45 p. m. 

Northern way, N. L. Northern, 

8-30 A. M. 

The treasurer will be at his office from 4 
to 5p.m. on Saturdays throughout the term. 

The museum of natural history will be 
open to visitors from 3 to 4 p. m. each 
afternoon excepting Saturday and Sunday. 

The college librarj' will be open from 2 
to 4 p. M. and from 7 to 8 p. m. each day 
excepting Saturday aud Sunday'. On Sat- 
urdaj' it will be open from 9 to 12 a. m. and 
from 2 to 4 p. m., and on Sunday from 2 to 
3 p. M. 

President Goodell will be at his office 
from 2 to 4 p. m. every afternoon except 
Saturday and Sunday. 



ALUMNI NOTES. 

E. D. Allen, '85, Experiment Station, 
Washington, D. C. 

W. H. Allen, '86, Burnside, Conn. 

W. H. Bishop, '82, Prof, of Agriculture, 
Tougaloo, Miss. 

G. H. Barker, M. D., '85, Surgeon on 
" Pensecola" of the South American Squad- 
ron, ordered to Brazil. 

David Barry, '90, Thomson-Houston El- 
ectric Co., Lynn, Mass. 

W. E. Chase, '87, 1070 1-2 2nd St., 
Portland, Oregon ; Contractor and builder. 

F. S. Cooley, '88, Farm Superintendent, 
Amherst, Mass. 

F. C. Eldred, '73, Farmer, Sandwich, 
Mass. 

C. F. W. Felt, '86, Maintaiuance Eng. 
of G. C. & Sante Fe R. R., Oleburne, Tex. 

David Goodale, '82, Sugar Planter, Pa- 
papaikon, Hawaiian Islands. 

G. E. Newman, '88, Helena, Montana, 
Agent for J. K. Spaulding & Co. 

M. N. North, '88, Entering Am. Vet. 
College, N. Y. 

C. S.^Plumb, '82, Vice Director of the 
Agricultural Experiment Station, Lafay- 
ette, Ind. 

C. H. Preston, '83, Farmer, Asylum Sta- 
tion, Mass. 



8 



AGGIE LIFE. 



H. B. Simpson, '73, Clerk iu Treasury, 
Washiugton, D. C. 

H. E. Stockbvidge, '78, President of the 
Agricultural College and Director of the 
Experiment Station, Fargo, North Dakota. 

Henry "Wells, '72, manager of the Wash- 
ington Hydraulic Press Brick Co., Kellogg 
Building, Washington, D. C. 

F. O. Williams, '90, Assistant Agricul- 
lurist at Hatch Experiment Station, Am- 
herst, Mass. 

C. A. Whitney, '89, gardener for D. B. 
Wesson, Northboro, Mass. 

MARRIAGES. 

T. P. Felton, '90, married, June 24, '90, 
at Marlboro, Mass., to Miss Mary L. 
Whitcomb. 

A. J. Hayward, '88, married July 10th, 
'90, at Ashbj', to Mrs. Jennie S. Ashley. 

NON GRADUATES. 

G-. A. Goddard, '90, trying to enter Uni- 
versity of Denver. 

G. Baldus, '92, trying to enter the Signal 
Service. 

G. M. and C. Tyng are trying to enter 
Cornell. 



ASSOCIATION OFFICERS. 
The College Association Officers elected 
at the Mass Meetmg Sept. 5, 1890, are as 
follows : — 

READING ROOM ASSOCIATION. 

Pres. E. P. Felt, '91. 
Sec. and Treas. H. B. Emerson, '92. 
1st Director H. M. Howard, '91. 
2nd " F. G. Stockbridge, '92. 

3d " F. H. Henderson, '93. 

4th '• A. J. Morse, '94. 

FOOT-BALL ASSOCIATION. 

Pres. J. B. Hull, '91. 

Sec. and Treas. G. B. Willard, '92. 

1st Director W. C. Paige, '91. 

2nd '■ E. Rogers, '92. 

3d " J. R. Perrv, '93. 

4th " F. I. Parker, '94. 

BASE-BALL ASSOCIATION. 

Pres. L. F. Horner, '91, 

Sec. and Treas. H. E. Crane, '92. 

1st Director W. C. Paige, '91. 

2nd " G. B. Willard, '92. 

3d " J. Baker, '93. 

4th " Drovpne, '94, 

ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION. 

Pres. J. B. Hull, 91. 

Sec. and Treas. G. E. Taylor, '92. 

1st Director A. G. Eames, '91. 

2nd " E. Rogers, '92. 

3d " J. R. Periy, '93. 

4th " I. C. Green, '94. 

TENNIS ASSOCIATION. 

Pres. W. C. Paige. 91. 
Sec. and Treas. F. G. Stockbridge, '92. 
1st Director C. A. Magill, '91. 
2nd " R. P. Lyman, '92. 

" D. P. Harvev, '93. 

" L. H. Bacon", '94. 



3d 

4th 



E, B, DlgKHSOIJ, D, D, S, 



KELLOGG'S BLOCK, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Office Hours, 9 to 12 a. m.. 1-30 to 5 p. M. 



;^"Ether ."ind Niti'ous Oxide Gas .idministered when 
desired. 



.A.T the: 



jlMHERST CASH SHOE STORE, 

You can j^et tlie most for your mouej-. 
BOOTS A^T> SHOES, RUBBERS, OVER- 
SHOES, SLIPPERS, TRUNKS, 
AND BAGS. 



REPAIRING NEATLY DONE. 



HAWES & STINSON, 



CASH ROW, AMHERST, MASS. 



* Dane! 








Third Season opens October 1 and closes j4.pril 1, 



AMHERST HOUSE 

LIYERY, FEED, /nd SALE STABLE. 

T. L. PAIGE, Prop'r, 



HACKS TO ANB FROM ALL TRAINS, OM- 
NIBUSES. HACKS, DOUBLE AND 
SINGLE TEAMS FURNISHED 
AT SHORT NOTICE. 
CAREFUL DRIVERS. ' FAIR PRICES. 

AMBERST, MASS. 



Private and Select Classes at reasonable 
rates. Also, Private Lessons in Round 
Dancing and the German. 

For particulars and terms apply to 

A. X. PETIT, 

Sox 282, A.ni1ierstf Mass, 
Residence, Cor, Triangle and East Pleasant Sts. 

Mass. Agi|iculturaL College, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHERST, MASS. 

We would inform tlie friends of the college, 
and the puljlic generally, that we are prepared 
to supply 

FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND 

SHRUBS, SMALL FRUITS AND 

PLANTS, 

true to uame, also 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 
all at the lowest price. 
For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and Small 
Fruits, address. 

Prof, S. T. Maynard, 

AMHERST, MASS 




• THE AMHERST 



FURNITURE /ND CARPET STORE. 



A complete line of goods suited to the students' 
wants. 

BEDSTEADS, MATTRESSES, PILLOWS, 



STUDY DESKS AND CHAIRS, 
LOUNGES, 



WINDOW SHADES, DRAPERIES, 

CARPETS, RUGS, ETC., ETC. 



A.U ffoods Strictly Cash and at Loivest Frices, 



E. D. MARSH, 



10 PHOENIX ROW, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Sheet Mnsic, 



JV[iir=;ic Books^ 



Strings 

FOR THE, VIOLIN, BANJO, GUITAR, 

Cushman's Music Store, 



J, M. WAITE k SON, 



AND DEALERS IN 



Hats, Caps, Furs, Trunks, Bags, Furnishing Goods. 

Latest Styles in Furnishings. Agent for 

Knox's and Youman's Hats. Sole 

Agent for Pittsfield 

Laundry. 

Hats Repaired. , Furs Renovated 

Give us a call bcfor(! purchasing. 
JHO, 5 PH(ENIX ROW, AMHERST, MASS. 



%m\itxBt Mouse, 



o 

AMHERST, MASS. 



The undersigned is pleased to announce 
to his former patrons and others desiring 
Game Spreads or Dinners, that he is always 
prepared to accomodate (at short notice 
large or small parties. 

Ample dining room capacity for 200 peo- 
ple. 

LORENZO CHASE, Prop'R. 

,(5 DENTISTS. 5).. 

C. S. GATES, D. I). S. 
T. G. HUNTINGTON, D. D. S. 

CUTT^BR'S BLOCK, AMHBJIST, 3IASS, 



OFFICE HOURS: 
9 A.. T^. TO 5 S'. T^/L. 

Ether and Nitrous Oxide administered wlien 
desired. 



I7OWBS ^ I^EJjLOGG, 



DEALERS IN 



^■2TUDEr]T'S SUPPLIES'^ 

FANCY GROCERIES, CROCKERY, CIGARS, 

CIGARETTES, TOBACCO. FRUITS 

AND CONFECTIONERY, 

LftrQP gOODS filJD KEl^OgEI^B OIL, 

3 Doors South of f. 0., - AMBBRST, MASS. 



EDWIN NELSON, 

Books and Stationery, 

Next door to Post Office, 
AMHERST, MASS. 



WOOD'S HOUSE 

HM^ D5EggII]g WOW' 

Razors Honed and Shears Sharpened at 
short notice. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



C. R. KENFIELD, 

^-JBWELEl^,-^ 



IVood's Bloclc, 



Am h erst f Mass, 



SPECIAL. 



A Stem Wind and Set Waltliam, Hampden, Elgin or II 
linois movement in a Gold Pilled Case for ^l.'j.OO. 



Umbrellas covered wliile yon wait, also dealer 
in Guns, Rifles, Ammunition and Sporlini>- Goods 
of all kinds. Amateur Rliotojirapliic Outfits and 
Supplies. Views and Pictures tai^en wlien de- 
sired. Views of Amlierst and A'^iehiity for sale. 
Call and see before pnrcliasins elsewlierc. 

X1®=WATCH AND CLOCK REPAIRING A SPECIALTY. JBOr 



J. L. LOVELL, 

-^PHOTOSPPHB!},^ 

DRY PLATES, COMPOUND DEVELOPER 
AND SENSITIZED PAPER, READY 

FOR USE. 



PRINTING FOR AMATEURS 



Done in the iicst manner. 



jmumrst, mass. 



I \_/ I 



H 



H 



piercM Tailor, 



-A. 1S/II3:EI^S T, 



DAlA-SiS. 



OFFICE OP 



EDWARD A. THOMAS, 

Fif^E^ip Life I^rance /ge^t. 

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE AND TO LET. 



OJfice, Cooks RlocJc, Amherst, Mass. 



el. p. I^AWSON, 



DEALER IN 



WftTKHES, SLOSKg, JEWELRY, 

FINE POCKET CUTLERY, SILVER AND 

PLATED WARE, OPTICAL GOODS, 

CANES, SPORTING AND 

FANCY G(.)ODS, 

Gold Pens, Fine Stationery, 



REPARING NEATLY and PROMPTLY DONE. 



AMHERST, MASS. 



DWIGHT fflOOI^E, 



BILLIARD AND POOL 

3 Fhffiiir Row (ITp-stnira), 
AMHERST, MASS, 



This page reserved for the 
MASSACHUSETTS AGRICUTURAL COLLEGE. 




/^ 



^^^ 



'.-OA^yCyt 



ly'iypi^'Uyl/'^ . 




AGGIE LIFE. 



VOL. I. 



AMHERST, MASS., OCTOBER 15, 1890. 



No. 2 



WHERE DO YOU BUY m\ 

Meerschaviin Pipes? 
French Briar Pipes? 
Clioice Tobacco? 
Spoua'es? 
Soap? 

Hair Brushes from 25 cts. up? 
Combs from 5 cts. up? 
Choice New York Confectionery? 
Shaving Mugs? 
Shaving Soap? 
Lather Bruslies? 

Cigarettes, fresh every two weeks? 
Tlie Best Soda in America? 
The Best Bay Rum? 
Imported Perfumes? 
Prescriptions prepared by licensed pharmacists? 
Imported Domestic Tooth Brushes? 

If you have not obtained these necessaries at 
DEUEL'S DRUG STORE, you liave begun 
wrong. Deuel's is the leading Drug Store in 
Western Mass., and keeps the largest assort- 
ment of goods at bottom prices. 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE, 

Amtierst Hoose Block, Aiiiiierst, Mass, 



HENRT ADAMS, 

PHARMACIST, 



NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, 



- AMHERST, MASS. 



Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORT- 
ED AND DOMESTIC CIGARS, 
CIGARETTES, ETC., 
MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, 
FISHING TACKLE AND SPORTING GOODS 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, and Sporting 
and Springfield Rifles. 

Sunday and night calls responded to at resi- 
dence, first door west of "Wood's Hotel. 



(brugs, Medicines, 

TOILET ARTICLES, 

CONFECTIONERY, CIGARS, CIGARETTES 

AND SMOKERS' GOODS. 



FSYSICIANS' PMMSCRIFTXONS CJ.RE- 
.FUiXr COMPOTTNDED, 



6 PHCENIX ROW. 

Order your GOil.£ bere. 



THE ALUMNI AND THE COLLEGE. 

The graduates of the Agricultural Col- 
lege are, as a rule, men devoted to the 
welfare of their Alma Mater. 

As a rule, too, the college is proud of 
its alumni. This mutual feeling of regard 
and respect is fostered by the presence of 
some of the best of the older graduates on 
the Board of Trustees and iu the College 
Faculty. This is as it should be. The 
tendency to put the control of our college 
into the hands of those best informed as to 
its needs and most interested in its devel- 
opment is a good one, and should receive 
encouragement at the hands of all con- 
cerned. Edward Bellamy professes to trace 
in government bj' alumni the germ of what 
will iu the future prove to be the corner- 
stone of a new political dispensation. Con- 
sider his visionary idea prophetical or 
extravagant, as you will, the fact remains 
that those' who have passed through all the 
hopes and disappointments, experiences 
adverse and otherwise, of undergraduates, 
and are now free from the prejudices and 
devoid of the ambition, or lack of it, of the 
latter, are the ones best suited to assume 
direction of the education of their juniors. 

The comparative youth of the greater 
number of our graduates and the ineligi- 
bility for various reasons of many of the 
older ones has prevented, up to the piesent 
time', a majority representation of alumni 
on the Board of Trustees. Youth, how- 
ever, cannot always be urged as an objec- 
tion against the ex-Aggies, and their rapid 
geographical distribution throughout the 
state will soon prevent the offering of the 
old excuse of the necessity of equitable 
local apportionment of the office of trus- 
teeship. 

With such men as Wm. H. Bowker and 
Wm. Wheeler in the corporation, the grad- 
uates are well represented as to brains and 
enthusiasm. Where the majority rules, 
however, something more than brains and 
enthusiasm is needed. A further increase 
of the number of alumni Trustees on the 
Board is demanded. 

With such men to choose from as P. M. 
Harwood, Elmer D. Howe, Wm. C. Parker 
and a score of others it cannot be difficult 
to select a few more representative gradu- 
ates for the honors of trusteeship. Far be 



it from the writer to disparage any of the 
non-graduate members of the corporation. 
It is patent to all that every one of them 
has the welfare of the institution at heart. 
The best evidence of their ability is to be 
found in the present prosperous condition 
of the college. Many of them are pioneers 
in the cause of agricultural education, and 
as such are worthy of our deepest respect 
and gratitude. As these men retire from 
active participation in affairs, what can be 
more logical than to fill their places with 
those whose training they have supervised, 
men whom they have pronounced worthy 
of receiving the diploma of the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College? 

It is also fitting and proper that mem- 
bers of the Faculty should be, as far as 
possible, graduates of the college. Pro- 
fessors Maynard, Warner, Wellington, 
Brooks and Paige are all alumni. Pres. 
Goodell and Dr. Goessmann have been 
identified with the college since its organi- 
zation and are better known to the whole 
body of graduates than any alumnus can 
be. Other members of the Faculty are 
skillful teachers of their special branches, 
and a criticism based on non-graduation 
would have no weight in their cases. But 
as vacancies occur in the Faculty let them 
be filled by Aggie graduates. It is to be 
supposed that under the jiew appropriation 
from the national government additional 
instruction will be provided in some depart- 
menjts. Those in authority cannot pay a 
more graceful compliment to the college, 
or better establish the sincerity of their 
faith in their own works than by permitting 
Aggie graduates to train Aggie undergrad- 
uates, whether as members of the corpora- 
tions or of the Faculty. 



The things just out of reach seem always fairer 

Thaa any thing to-day can have and hold ; 
To-morrow's sunshine will be brighter, rarer — 

And so we miss the present hour's gold. 
To-day is lost in dreaming of To-morrow ; 

And when to-morrow comes the heart will lay 
Plans for the future, thinking o'er in sorrow, 

The squandered blessings of the yesterday. 



A COUPLET REGARDING A .COUPLET. 

The perfect bliss of a birch canoe 

Lies in the fact there's but room for two. 

— New York Herald, 



10 



AGGIE LIFE. 



THE BOTANIC MUSEUM. . 

Among the first buildings erected wlien 
the college was founded was the Botanic 
Museum, built in the years '67 and '68. 
An extension was added to the north side 
of this two years ago making place for a 
laboratory for the study of structural bot- 
any, and two tool-rooms. One of the tool- 
rooms is still occupied by the horticultural 
department of the Hatch Experiment Sta- 
tion. The partition which separated the. 
other tool-room from the laboratory has 
recently been removed making of the latter 
a very spacious and well lighted room. 
Glass cases for the microscopes and other 
instruments are arranged along two sides 
of the room, and a developing closet for 
the photographer will occupy the northwest 
corner of the Hatch room. In addition to 
the table extending around the north and 
west sides of the room, there will be sev- 
eral small tables of such size as to accom- 
modate two students each. 

The new steam apparatus for heating all 
the rooms of the building is found to be a 
decided improvement over the hot air fur- 
nace formerly used. 

The Botanical recitation room has not 
been omitted in the general renovation dur- 
ing the past summer. The unusual size of 
the Freshman class made more seats a ne- 
cessity, and another row has been supplied 
from the room above. The microscope 
ease has been removed from the southeast 
corner of the room and the three cases of 
botanical diagrams so placed as to be con- 
venient for reference and illustration. 
These diagrams are of especial interest, as 
they were drawn bj' Professor Maynard 
himself, while a student in this institution ; 
the figures were copied from various au- 
thors under the direction of President Clark 
with a view to obtaining representatives of 
all the typical forms of inflorescence, stem, 
and leaf structure. Every family is repre- 
sented by illustrations of their structural 
characteristics as well as of the flower and 
its separate parts. There are about 3000 
drawings in all. 

Passing now to the upper floor of the 
Museum or the Museum proper, the princi- 
pal object of interest is the Knowlton Her- 
barium. Here we have a collection of 
about 10,000 dried plants, principally na- 
tives of North America, but including also 
numerous interesting specimens from the 
Old World. The herbarium was collected 
by Mr. W. W. Denslow of New York and 
purchased for the college about twenty 
years since, by William Knowlton, Esq. of 
Upton, Mass. It is very interesting to 



look over a large collection of plants like 
this, as there is such an endless variety of 
forms. 

Besides the Denslow collection, there are 
several beautiful collections of cryptoga- 
mous plants. A part of the herbarium 
case has been furnished with drawers for 
the mosses, liche is and fungi, which are 
mounted on small cards. 

The chairs and desks in the Museum are 
soon to give place to two show cases where 
the fruit models and other objects of inter- 
est can be neatly arranged. A very curi- 
ous and interesting collection of woods 
adorns the walls of the Museum. There 
are about fifty specimens collected from 
the Himalaya Mountains. They are cross- 
sections, taken from logs of various sizes, 
one surface of which is polished and waxed 
so as to exhibit the color and structure of 
the bark, the sap and the heart-wood. 
Each specimen is bound with iron to pre- 
serve it from injury from splitting and also 
as a means of hanging them on the wall. 

There is also a large collection of native 
woods nicely prepared and grouped in 
cases on either side of the room. This 
collection was obtained from various 
sources, but the greater part was received 
from the Government. After the Centen- 
nial in '76, the collection of woods there 
exhibitedby the United States Government 
was distributed among the State institu- 
tions ; hence the excellence of onrcollection. 

On the south side of the Museum are 
two cases ; the lower one contains a collec- 
tion of seeds in bottles ; the upper one ex- 
hibits a variety of plaster of Paris models 
of the common vegetables, including a 
model of the wouderful squash that lifted 
4500 lbs. by its expansive force. This 
remarkable incident took place in the north 
propagating pit. The apparatus used as a 
lifting machine for the squash consisted of 
a frame which supported the squash while 
on top was placed a harness of iron straps 
so arranged that when the squash increased 
in size, an iron knife-edge or fulcrum 
would be forced up against a large lever 
one end of which was made fast, and the 
long end weighted with anvils, pails of 
putty, ore, old iron. By means of the 
weights placed at certain distances from 
the knife-edge on which the upward pres- 
sure of the squash was exerted, its expan- 
sive force was measured. An interesting 
and detailed account of the test accompa- 
nied by illustrations may be found in the 
twelfth annual report of the college. The 
lever that was used may be seen standing 
in a corner of the Museum. 



In the large glass case in the southwest 
corner of this room is placed for reference 
a system of United States weights and 
measures. 

It is earnestly hoped that the good work 
thus begun in the improvement of our bo- 
tanical collections will go on in other lines 
that we may have ere long a classified ar- 
rangement of our mineralogical collections 
now so scattered. 



PALMISTRY. 



A darling little soft, white hand, 
Rose palmed and sweet to kiss ; 

No sculptor ever carved from stone 
A fairer hand than this. 

Upon my eyelids it would rest, 

Or o'er my forehead pass, 
Softer than ever rose leaves fell 

Upon the waving grass. 

No other hand unto my heart 

Could greater solace bring 
Unless, mayhap it chanced to be 

Four aces and a king. 

— F. H. CuRTiss, in Life. 



ANOTHER VALUABLE ADDITION 
TO THE METEOROLOGICAL DE- 
PARTMENT. 

The Meteorological Department of the 
Hatch Experiment Station of Amherst has 
recently received a valuable addition to its 
list of equipments, in the form of a Thom- 
son's Electrograph. This instrument is 
designed for measuring the electrical 
potential of the atmosphere. It was or- 
dered by Prof. Warner, of the Elliot 
Brothers, London, about a year ago, since 
which time it has been in the process of 
manufacture. 

The Electrograph consists of a Thom- 
son's Quadrant electrometer, registering 
apparatus and water-dripping apparatus. 
The water-dripping apparatus, which will 
be placed at the top of the tower, consists 
of a strong cylindrical tank of zinc, two feet 
in diameter and eighteen inches deep ; at the 
bottom of this is a spout five feet long ter- 
minating in a fine point. The tank stands 
upon three glass columns, thus being well 
insulated. Water is kept constantly in the 
tank and allowed to run out in drops from the 
spout. The electricity collected from the air 
by the water is carried by a flue wire to the 
electrometer below. This Thomson's Elec- 
trometer is the most complicated 'dectro- 
metric instrument ever invented, and a de- 
tailed description of it in this limited space 
would be impossible ; it will suffice to say 
however that it contains four quadrant 
magnets, to which the wire from the tank 



AGGIE LIFE, 



is connected. lu connection witii tliem is 
a magnetic needle liung in sucli a manner 
that variations of tlie amonnt of electricitj' 
imparted to tlie qnadrants by tbe wire from 
above cause it to deflect. Attached to tbe 
upper part of this needle is a mirror the 
use of which will be seen b}' the descrip- 
tion of the registering apparatus. 

This latter apparatus is enclosed in a 
mahogany case and consists of a powerful 
clock, with weight, second pendulum, dial, 
etc., which runs a cylinder upon which is 
stretched sensitized photographic paper. 

Near one side of tbe box is a gas burner 
wtih an opaque chimney, in one side of 
which IS a circular opening. The light 
from this burner is thrown by means of 
prisms on to the mirror of the needle in the 
electrometer. The mirror reflects this 
pencil of light to the sensitized paper upon 
the cylinder which is revolving at the rate 
of one revolution in thirty hours. The 
position of the mirror and consequently of 
the needle is thus constantly photographed 
and the deflection measured by means of a 
scale. A shutter suitably geared from the 
clock intercepts for four minutes every 
alternate hour the passage of the light, the 
gaps marking a time scale on the paper. 
During the same time the quadrants are 
put to earth, this being necessary as the 
Electrometer, after a certain time becomes 
overcharged with electricity. 

This Thomson's Electrograph is an ex- 
ceedingly delicate and complicated instru- 
ment and cost the Station about $600.00. 

There have been 168 of these electrome- 
ters manufactured by Elliot Brothers, most 
of them being used in institutions of learn- 
ing. But this is probably the only complete 
Electrograph in this country ; and there are 
but few in the world. 

The Observatory at Greenwich has one 
exactly like the one here, and there is also 
one similar in construction at the Ken Ob- 
servatory near London. 

The Mass. Hatch Experiment Station 
was established in January 18>'9, with the 
following role of instruments : Sun thermom- 
eter, force of wind instrument, anemometer, 
menroscope, Pluviameter, and barometer. 
Some time after, a thermograph and a wet 
and dry bulb thermometer were added. 
All these instruments are self-registering. 

The addition of the electrograph this 
year, makes the observatory one of the best 
in this country, and when the self-register- 
ing rajn and snow gauge, and the plaiime- 
ter, which are now in process of construc- 
tion at New York, arrive we can safely 
say it will be the best in the country. 



AQUATICS. 

A long felt want of the college has been 
a pond of water near the college buildings, 
a place where the students might indulge in 
the most delightful of water sports,— skat- 
ing. Ill order to gratify a desire for this 
pastime students have been obliged, in 
former years, to go either to Factory Hol- 
low or East Street, each nearly two miles 
distant. The inconvenience of this will at 
once be apparent to all. Most of the stu- 
dents, feeling that they could not spare 
the time for so long a walk, have denied 
themselves the privilege, and have thus 
been deprived of the exhilarating exercise 
that skating affords and which all need so 
much. 

Last winter, however, the demand be- 
came such that the students, under the 
guidance of Prof. Maynard, constructed 
a temporary dam at the bridge on the path 
leading from North College to the Botanic 
Museum. This caused the overflow of a 
strip of land south of the path, which, 
though still inadequate, furnished facilities 
for skating far superior to those of former 
years. 

But as previoush' stated this dam was 
only a temporary structure, and last spring 
it was torn down. Partial promises have 
frequently been made that a more exten- 
sive lake should be formed, by using the 
road v/hich crosses the upper end of the 
ravine as a dam, which can be done at a 
very moderate expense. Indeed, the land 
has already been surveyed and staked, 
showing the surface over which the water 
will flow. 

And now we are sure that it is the desire 
of the whole college that this matter should 
not be deferred any longer, but the dam 
should be constructed this fall, so that the 
lake will have time to fill up before cold 
weather. 

Aside from the value of the proposed 
lake as a place of recreation, it would add 
very materially to the beauty of the land- 
scape. It would also supply the college 
with ice, while now the college teams are 
obliged to draw all their ice from North 
Amherst. And the land overflowed eould 
not be put to better use, as there is plenty 
more for agricultural purposes. 



The great high road of human welfare 
lies along the old highway of steadfast well 
doing, and they who are the most persis- 
tent and work in the truest spirit will invar- 
iably be the most successful. Success 
treads on the heels of every right effort. — 
Smiles. 



A TRUE STORY OF PRIDE AND 
ITS FALL. 

An American student about to matricu- 
late at the University of GiJttingen, pre- 
sented his letters of introduction to the 
Professor whose duty it is to register new- 
comers. Before reading the credentials 
the Professor asked him at what American 
University he had graduated. 

"I am, sir, a graduate of Yale Uni- 
versity." 

"Yale, Yale," said the German, "never 
heard of it !" 

"Is it possible ! Why, Yale is the best 
known college in America !" 

"So! Is it anywhere near Amherst? I 
have known many bright men from the 
College of Agriculture at Amherst, but 
never before heard of Yale !" 



AN OUTING. 



At 5.19 p. M. on Oct. 1st, '91 started for 
N. Y. All reached New Haven after a 
time, and spent the evening there very pleas- 
antly, some at the theatre, others looking 
around, while a few tried to find our old 
classmate W". H. Pond at Yale, but were 
unsuccessful. 

At 1 A. M. we all started on the C. H. 
Northam lor N. Y. arriving at 6 a. m. Af- 
ter looking around a little we started for 
West Point at 9 a. m. ariiving there at 11. 
50 A. M. The trip op the Hudson, on the 
elegant steamer New York, is beyond de- 
scription by this pen. The majority of the 
class took the same boat-liack the next day 
at 2.50 p. M. for N. Y. Here they spent 
their time very pleasantly at the difllerent 
places of interest in N. Y. and returned 
Saturday afternoon to Amherst by train. 
Four of the class took the steamer Albany 
for Albany, at West Point, and completed 
that superb trip up the Hudson to Albany, 
arriving there at 6 p. m. 

On the trip up, the Poughkeepsie Bridge 
and Vassar college attracted particular at- 
tention, especially the latter. 

The evening was spent in Albany and 
the next morning, they left for Troy, and 
from there went to North Adams, where 
they stopped over to see some veiT fine 
cascades, and then started through the 
tunuel home b}- way ol'Northampton where 
they met the majority of the class who had 
returned through N. Y. All agree that the 
trip was a success and we heartily recom- 
mend any such trip to our college mates. 
We hope to publish the prize essay later. 



12 



AGGIE LIFE. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Published rortnlglitly by the Students of the 
Mass. Agricultural College. 



Terms $1,00 per year, in advance. 



Single copies, 10c. 



Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 

BO AMD O-P MDITOItS: 

E. P. FELT, Editor-in-Chief, 
O. V. B. LAGE, Business Manager, 
A. G. EAMES, '91, H. N. LEGATE, '91, 

J. L. FIELD, '92, G. E. TAYLOR, '92, 

G. P. CUELEY, '93. 

Address all communications to the Business Manager. 



Evert few years there has been some 
addition made to our concrete walks. The 
college is now connected with town by con- 
crete ; the nest place tliat demands attention 
is the walk from North college to the M. A. 
C. Boarding House. Sixty men or almost 
half the entire college, pass over there and 
back three times daily. There is a piece 
of concrete walk extending from the bridge 
nearly to Dr. Walker's house, but by some 
oversight, it was laid so low that the lower 
part is covered with gravel, while the 
remainder of the walk acts as a gutter 
whenever it rains. The rest of the way, 
where there is no walk at all, is capable, 
and does, produce plenty of mud on the 
slightest provocation. After this receives 
proper attention, all would be pleased to see 
a concrete walk from North College to the 
Botanic Museum. 



The Reading-Room is a place where 
much valuable time can be saved that 
would otherwise be wasted. Here the 
students have access to the leading daily 
papers, many of the best agricultural week- 
lies, besides the monthlies, the illustrated 
and other amusing papers. Now, if ten 
minutes a day will make a man master of a 
new language in two or three years, will 
not the same time spent in the Reading 
Room yield equally great results? If we 
also take into account the Library, we 
shall certainly conclude that now is the 
golden opportunity to acquire information. 
Few men after graduation will possess 
better facilities for reading than they now 
enjoy, almost free of cost. "Time is money." 
At present our extra time if spent in work 
is valued at 12 1-2 cents per hour ; and it 
is fair to assume that later it will be worth 
more, therefoie, all things considered, will 
it not pay best, to work less and learn more, 
while in college? 



the college, to some place of interest. 
Such trips, while they take money and 
break into college duties somewhat, are, on 
the whole, profitable in more ways than 
one. A man may not have perfect lessons 
the day after he returns, but this is more 
than made up by the renewed vigor with 
which he settles down to work once more. 
And, of course, the trip brings new things 
to his notice, and he comes into closer 
sympathy with the world, which will so 
soon be his battle-field. These trips are a 
benefit to all, and it is for the various 
classes to determine whether they shall be 
kept up or not. Whenever such opportu- 
nities come to any class, work it up, go in 
and make it a success, don't allow a single 
man to remain at home, get started, and 
then see all you can. Under such condi- 
tions the Faculty will rarely veto any 
worthy trip. 



We find in an old Index an account of a 
Natural History Society. It might not be 
a bad plan to have one in college now. It 
ought to receive the hearty approval of the 
Faculty and would be a source of both 
instruction and recreatisin to the students. 
By charging each member a moderate ini- 
tiation fee the society would be enabled to 
offer prizes for collections, which might aid 
Prof. Fernald materiall}- in making up the 
college collections, and for scientific essays, 
which might be articles of real merit. 
Profs. Fernald and Maynard would proba- 
bl}' be willing to allow the organization the 
use of their labratories. And trips to the 
mountains in search of subjects for study 
would be a pleasant sort of recreation for 
non-athletic students. 



The brightest spots in a man's college 
course are the trips made with his class, or 



Again we call for contributions to Aggie 
Life. We are here to stay, and prosose to 
come out on time if we have to "crib" 
whole pages "straight" from Webster's Un- 
abridged, but it will be far pleasanter to 
have well prepared articles from our fellow 
students ou subjects in which they are 
interested. We wish to say just here that 
Aggie Life is a college paper, and we try 
not to be affected by any class spirit. If 
any criticism is made upon any of the 
classes, it is made as by disinterested 
observers, and not in a partisan manner. 
If you do not like to be criticised, bear 
yourselves, one and all, so as to be above 
criticism. 



enough to make the fellows feel like work. 
If nothing is done this fall, we fear all 
interest will have died out when the drow- 
siness and lassitude of Spring are on us, 
but if we have an out door meeting of the 
Athletic Association this Fall each man 
will know what his weak and what his 
strong points are, and will know what to 
train for before the Spring meeting. If the 
Athletic Board will just.raise some money 
to pay for prizes and apparatus, we will 
hope the Faculty will grant u.- some Friday 
for the contests. 



Why can't wa have a Fall Field Day ? In 
a few weeks the air will be just bracing 



What electives do you have ? This is one 
of the most common questions asked us 
by men of other colleges, and when we 
answer that we have no electives, they 
invariably efpress surprise. Almost ever}' 
college course now includes a large number 
of elective studies. In many colleges, the 
last two years course is entirely elective 
and no particular study is required. For 
some time past there has been a growing 
feeling in favor of the introduction of elec- 
tives. Many feel that they cannot afford 
to spend time on studies in which they 
have no interest. If a man wishes to make 
a speciality of any study, he naturally pre- 
fers to spend more time on that study than 
on others. As the course now stands, he 
is often unable to do this. If the last two 
years of the course had a number of elec- 
tives, this diflBculty would be largely obvi- 
ated. Coming directly from the common 
schools as many of our students do, it 
would hardly be advisable to allow them 
to select their own studies, during the first 
part of their college life. But by the 
Junior year any man ought to have suffi- 
ciently good judgement to choose for him- 
self. During the first two years his mind 
has been disciplined and his preferences as 
to those branches which he wishes to pur- 
sue, developed, so that he is able to make 
an intelligent choice. As this is an Agri- 
cultural College, it would certainly be 
advisable to require all the students to take 
agriculture ; but with tins exception all the 
Juuior and Senior studies should be elective. 
The extra expense involved has been one 
reason, in years past, against the iutroduc- 
tion of electives. The recent generous 
appropriation of the U. S. government has, 
however, helped us greatly in this matter. 
This certain and constantly increasing j'ear- 
ly income will do away with all the pecuni- 
ary difficulties which now stand in the way 
of the plan. We understand that there are 
several members of the Faculty who desire 
the introduction of electives, in order that 



AGGIE LIFE. 



13 



they may give more complete instruction 
in their departments to those students who 
desire it. This is an encouraging sign and 
it is probable that we will soon see a num- 
ber of electives added to the course. It is 
our earnest hope that we may soon see 
electives introduced, which will enable us 
to receive more thorough and advanced 
instruction in Chemistry, Mathematics, 
Botany and the Languages. Such a step 
would put the college on a broader and more 
liberal basis, and would enable it to com- 
pete with other educational institutions on a 
very advantageous footing. Certain it is 
that the students and all the friends of the 
college would welcome the innovation, and 
it is our earnest hope soon to see this sys- 
tem in full operation. 



THE EDUCATING POWER OF 
ATHLETICS. 
A prominent English statesman, who 
was known to have perfect control over 
himself in parliament once said, "I first 
learned to control myself on the cricket 
field at Rugby." There is a certain class 
of people who consider foot-ball and other 
athletic games as designed only to amuse 
and break bones. Let these look at the 
other side of the question. When we think 
how, in foot-ball, the will power is neces- 
sarily exerted in keeping one's self in per- 
fect control, a point recognized by every 
foot-ball player as essential to the success 
of his team ; how the reasoning powers 
are brought into action and all the facul- 
ties concentrated on the pointto be. gained, 
the discipline to the will and mii^d is ap- 
parent. The same is the case with the 
game of base-ball. The mind of the player 
is ready to sieze and take advantage of ev- 
ery failing of his opponent, thus teaching 
the mind to think quickly and correctly. 
Thus it is with all the diflerent branches of 
athletics ; while the body is being developed 
and the power of endurance increased, the 
intellect is at the same time receiving a 
training which when brought into play in 
the struggle of life will be invaluable to 
the possessor. Let athletics then be en- 
couraged in all our colleges and institutions 
of learning that they may send forth men 
who will take their place in the race of life 
with well developed bodies, on which is a 
head that shall stand ready to serve its 
possessor in every emergency. 



Read "Tea Tephi in Amity" in the Oct. 
number of Harpers. The picture of Am- 
herst town and college life is very amusing. 



GLEANINGS. 
Game to play. Foot-ball. 

Curtis, from Littleton, is a new addition 
to '94. 

The farm hands have been busy haying 
rowen. 

Edward Gregory, '90, made a brief visit 
to Amherst last week. 

In the reading-room there will be more 
"light on the subject." as hanging lamps 
have been put in this fall. 

Prof. Warner was absent on Monday, 
the 6th. His uncle in New Hampshire be- 
ing quite ill, he went to see him. 

Every man interested in athletics should 
be training up for the Fall Field Day, 
which we expect to have shortly. 

B. L. Hartwell, '89, has accepted a flat- 
tering offer to sing in the choir of one of 
the largest churches in Greenfield. 

The Morris Drum Corps goes to the Bel- 
chertown fair to-day to see the fair ladies, 
we presume, as much as to furnish music. 

A distemper, which presented itself here 
recently, caused the absence of many stu- 
dents from the various departments last 
week. 

The Trustees of the college held a meet- 
ing here on the 3d iust. Several important 
matters were discussed by them while in 
session. 

Why don't we have Fire Drill this term ? 
At present nothing has been done but pub- 
lish the general order. A little practice 
would enforce it on the minds of all. 

S. S. Teacher — "What is the chief end 
of man? " 

Little Boy — "Why, I reckon, sir, its the 
end that wears the hat." 

The Shaw Botanical Garden of St. Louis, 
offers six scholarships for garden pupils, 
its object being to train competent and 
skillful gardeners. The course extends 
over six years. 

Oct. 10th the W. I. L. S. met and dis- 
cussed the advisability of having a senate 
in Aggie. The weight of the argument and 
the merits of the question were both in 
favor of a senate. "There are two sides to 
every question — the wrong side and our 
side." 

Thomas Hoar, of Amherst, Mass., has 
returned to finish his course here. He en- 
tered in '92 but circumstances led him to 
remain away a year, but now that these 
have been somewhat altered, he decided to 
enter '93. We all heartily welcome him 
back. 



Last Monday the cadets were redivided 
as evenly as possible into four companies. 
Now the companies stand on the same 
ground, and therefore will have a fair show 
in the monthly competitive drills for the 
position of Color Company. We expect 
to publish the permanent appointments in 
the next issue. 

The Hatch Experiment Station has just 
completed arrangements at the upper plant 
house for an exhaustive test as to the rela- 
tive value of overhead. or underneath heat- 
ing. Both houses have been repiped, the 
furnaces refitted, both alike, and provided 
with separate chimneys. At the lower 
plant house a new chimney has just been 
completed. 

The W. I. L. S. now offers two prizes, a 
first prize of $3.00 to the best speaker, and 
a second prize of $2.00 to the next best 
speaker, of the Sophomore and Freshman 
classes. The competitors will be marked 
on the number of points made each evening. 
The judges will be the President, the 
First and Second Directors of the Society. 
The contest will commence next Friday 
evening and will continue to the last of the 
term. Here is a chance for these two 
classes to show what they are made of. 
Every Sophomore should determine that 
these prizes shall be won by members of 
his class, and every Freshman should make 
the same resolution. The contest is open 
to every member of these two classes, 
whether members of the W. I. L. S. or not. 
Now let every man work for his own honor 
and for the honor of his class. 

Bulletin No. 10 of the division of^ the 
Hatch Experiment Station is now ready. 
This number is one of the valuable ones 
that have been issued, containing as it does 
information of much importance, not only 
to the florist and market gardener, but also 
to the farmers. It contains an account of 
a series of tests with special fertilizers upon 
greenhouse plants, including carnations, 
lettuce, tomatoes and pansies. There is 
also an interesting account of observations 
made upon peach buds, the aim being to 
more fully solve the question of bud pro- 
tection during the winter. A very compre- 
hensive table giving the relative merits of 
one hundred varieties of strawberries, is 
published in the Bulletin, together ivith 
similar tables relating to raspberries and 
blackberries. This bulletin has a circula- 
tion of nearly 10,000, and if there is any 
farmer in the state who does not receive it 
he can do so without cost to himself by. 
addressing the Hatch Experiment Station, 
Amherst. 



14 



AGGIE LIFE. 



G, H, SANDERSON k CO, 



CASH DEALERS IN 



Hats, Caps, Umbrellas, and Gents' 
Furnishing Goods, 



CASH now, 



AMHERST. 



S/iNDEi|SOH & Thompson, 



CASH DEALERS IN 



Dry and Fancy Goods, 

HOSIERY, RIBBONS, AND SMALL 
WARES OF ALL KINDS. 

AMHERST, MASS. 

BOOTSaSHOES 

FOR EVERYBODY. 



A PINE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, 
BALS. AND CONGRESS, 

A FULL LINE OF 

E.XTBBEE, C3-OOIDS, 

FOOT-BALL SHOE.S AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 

Repairing Done Promptly. 
T, W. SLOAN, 

g yjicENix no w. 



S, J, SULLIVAN, 

DEALER IN 

Second- Hand Clothes 



FUENITUEE. 



"Orders promptly attended to. 
P.O.Box, 319, AMHERST, MASS. 



AMHERST, 52 ; AGGIE, 0. 

Thursday, October 9, Aggie played Am- 
herst on Blake Field, the object being 
practice for both sides. The teams lined 
up as follows : — 

Aggie's: — Carpenter, I.e. ; Crane, l.t. ; 
Baker, l.g. ; Magiil, c. ; Graham, r.g. ; H. 
M. Howard, r.t. ; E. C. Howard, r-e. ; 
Fletcher, quarter-back; Hull (capt.) and 
Perry, half-backs ; Starr, full-back. 

Amherst's : — Smith, I.e. ; Crocker, (capt.) 
l.t. ; Morse, l.g. ; Lewis, c. : Stewart, r.g. ; 
Allen, r.t. ; G. Rally, r.e. ; quarter-back, 
Lyall, half-backs, Jackson, and F. Rally ; 
Cutler, full-back. Referee. Willard of 
Aggie : umpire, Marshall of Amherst. 

Amherst made six touch-dowus followed 
by goals and four, failing goal. Hull 
made several good kicks followed up by 
Carpenter. Hull also did mo^t of the rush- 
ing, making a phenomenal ruu of 80 yards. 
H. M. Howard, breaking tlirough Amherst's 
rush-line, also made a 30 yard run. Hull, 
H. M. Howard, Fletcher and Starr did the 
bulk of the tackling, behind the lines. 
Starr's downing of Jackson is worthy of 
mention, and his spurting was good, but 
he could not carry Amherst's rush-line on 
his back. Our rush-line did not hold well, 
but Carpenter got through several times 
and E. C. Howard made some good tackles, 
Fletcher caught well but was injured while 
starting to ruu with the ball thus caught. 
His place was taken by Rogers. H. M. 
Howard bad not recovered from the bruise 
received in the Trinity game, and conse- 
quently he was not in condition to play his 
usual game. Becoming injured he was 
substituted by Rogers. Our men were too 
slpw in bunching to meet their opponents 
"V" and with the exception of Hull, Car- 
penter and Starr were too slow in their 
running. 

Of the Amlierst team, Jackson, hurt 
early in the first half, was substituted by 
Talcott, and Hamilton played r.e. till the 
intermission in place of G. Rally, who was 
hurt near the end of the half. After the 
intermission, Talcott played r.e., Jackson 
returned and pLayed half-back, Hamilton 
playing 1. e. and Smith quarter back. 
After playing nineteen minutes in the last 
half, the game was susi^euded at request of 
Capt. Hull. 



Y, M. C. A. PRAYER MEETINGS. 
Oct. 16— Walking by the Spirit. Gal. 5 : 

14-26. A. E. Meleudy, 
Oct. 19 — Sowing and Reaping. Gal. 6 : 

7-10 ; II Cor. 9:6. L, W, Smith, 
Oct. 23— Our Debts. Rom. 1 : 13-16. 

F. S. Hoyt. 
Oct. 26— To What are We Called? I Tim. 

6: 12. A. H Kirkland. 




^t 



^^m. 




#' 



Business is business FEANK WOOD will get up 
Spreads for the Boys this winter. Senrl your orders 
right along to get there first. 

fra-istk: :e>. ■vstooxj. 



M. A. C. STUDENTS SHOULD GO TO 



BLODSETT ^ 0LS^K 

FOR THEIR 



AND 



GENTS FURNISHING GOODS, 



Laundry Agency also. 



JOHN MULLEN, 



-DEALER IK- 



MEATS and PROVISIONS, 

VEGETABLES OF ALL KINDS IN SEASON, 

FISH AND OYSTERS, FOREIGN 

AND DOMESTIC FRUITS, 

AND CANNED 

GOODS. 

Palmer's Block, Main Street. 



E. R. BENNETT, 
Jei^eler, 

Optician, 

Watchmaker. 

FINE GOODS ! LOW PRICES ! 

GOOD WORK WARRANTED, 

First Door from Post OiBce.. 



AGGIE LIFE, 



15 



CJ . 





COLLEGE TAILOR, 



Siictessor to F. H. Budftj fi Co, AiiiliBRt Tailors 



Fall and Wliter Suiti, 
Wliitar Ovarcoals lo leasire, 

ORDERS TAKEN FOR SUITS AND 

OVERCOATS, FULL DRESS 

SUITS TO ORDER. 



GENTS' FURNISHING DEPARTMENT, 
COLLARS, CUFFS and TIES, 
SUSPENDERS >ND UNDERWEAR, 

Foot-Ball and Gpiiasiom Goods. 



J. 13. BRIIN^E 



Merchants' Row, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



MAILS. 
Mail leaves college for P. O. at 1 p. m. 
and 7 p. m. on week clays. On Sunday it 
leaves at 4-45 p. m. At the P. O. mails 
close as follows : 

Boston, 

7-45, 8-30, 10-15 a.m. ; 4-00, 6-45, 7-45 p.m. 

JSfeiu York, Western and Southern States, 

7-45, 10-15 A. M. ; 4-00, 6-45, 7-45 p. m. 

Northampton, Springfield and Western 

Massachusetts, 

7-20, 10-15, 10-45 A. M. ; 6-45 p. m. 

Northern way, N. L. Northern, 

8-30 A. M. 

The treasurer will be at his office from 4 

to 5 p. M. on Saturdays throughout the 

term. 

The museum of natural -history will be 
open to visitors from 3 to 4 each afternoon 
excepting Saturday and Sunday. 

The college library will be open from 2 
to 4 p. M. and from 7 to 8 p. m. each day, 
excepting Saturday and Sunday. On Sat- 
urday it will be open from 9 to 12 A. m. and 
from 2 to 4 p. M., and on Sunday from 2 
to 3 p. M. 

President Goodell will be at his office 
from 2 to 4 p. m. every afternoon except 
Saturday and Sunday. 



ALUMNI. 

E. W. Allen '85, Experiment Station, 
Washington, D. C. 

W. H. Atkins '86, Burnside, Ct. 

G. H. Barber, M. D. '85, Surgeon on 
"Pensecola" of the South American Squad- 
ron, ordered to Brazil. 

C. F. W. Felt '86, Eresident Engineer, 
Cleburne, Tex. G. C. & S. F. R. R. 

E. R. Flint '87, has entered on a two 
years course,of chemistry at the University 
of Gottingen, Germany. 

J. A. Hobbs '74, U. S. Land Office, Salt 
Lake City. 

J. E. Holt '88, Supt. of farm and grounds 
of Conn. Literary Institute, Suffield, Conn. 

B. A. Kinney '82, 6 Fessenden St., 
Derring, Me. (Photographer). 

Boonzo Hashiguchi, '81, Sapporo, Japan ; 
commissioner of Kokkaido Colonial Bureau 
and Pres. of Sapporo Agricultural college. 

M. North '89, Am Vet. college, N. Y. 

D. O. Nourse '83. elected Prof, of Agri- 
culture and Agriculturist to Va. Experiment 
station, Blacksburg, Va. 

Joel B. Page '71, Garden St., Hartford, 
Ct. ; farm Supt. 

E. B. Rawson '81, New York City ; teach- 
er at Friends Seminary. 



Rev. J. B. Renshaw B. D. '73, pastor of 
Congregational church, Spokane Falls, 
Washington ;Missionary pastor at Pleasant 
Prane. 

H. E. B. Waldron '79, Port Antonio Ja- 
maca, West Indies ; Supt. Banana Planta- 
tion. 

R. P. Woodbury '78, 2407 Perry ave., 
Kansas City. Sec. K C Live Stock Ex., 
Mo. 

MARRIAGES. 

John Mitchell Benedict M. D. '74, mar- 
ried to Jeuny Elizabeth Blateesley, Oct. 2, 
1890, at Waterbury, Ct. 

The marriage or' N. H. Whitcomb form- 
erly of '90, is flxed for to-day, Oct. 15th. 



'J'HE TRAIN SPED BY. 

It was a lovely summer's day, 
Through meadows sweet with new-mown hay, 
And wood-lands, where the green ferns lay, 
The train sped by. 

I leaned upon the window-seat 
And the balmy odors, soft and sweet, 
Seemed for a Prince's toilet meet, 
As the train sped by. 

We left the country and neared the town ; 
On the dusty streets the sun shone down, 
And back from the pavement its rays were thrown. 
As the train sped by. 

Ye Gods ! What a lovely smile was there ! 
What a splendid wealth of golden hair ! 
And a face of beauty, rich and rare. 
As the train sped by. 

It was only a passing smile, 
Why should it so my heart beguile? 
Was I ensnared in Cupid's wile ? 
As the train sped by. 

Wherefore it is I cannot say. 
Yet would I travel that road each day, 
Could I but catch that smile on the way, 
As the train sped by. 



SAVE YOUR MINUTES. 

Napoleon, speaking of the Austriaus, 
after he had repeatedly beaten them in 
battle, with the advantage of numbers and 
position on their side, said, " The Austri- 
ans are brave soldiers, but they have never 
learned the value of minutes." And by 
these words Napoleon indicated a source of 
his own exceptional power. 

It is even now a recognized fact that 
the man who is always busy can do some 
extra work sooner, than the man who has 
plenty of time on his hands. The busy 
man drives his work, the man of leisure 
lets his work drive him. 

As college men, we are forming habits 
that will last a life time, therefore, let us 



i6 



AGGIE LIFE. 



form the habit of looking after the minutes ; 
we can replace lost money or property of 
any kind, but time flies never to return. 

But how shall we make our time count? 
Probably, the best way is to plan each half 
day in the mind, taking care to have the 
plan flexible enough for any emergency ; 
and in addition never try to perform any 
work, mental or physical, at a disadvan- 
tage, for the simple reason that it is a 
waste of time and decidedly injurious to 
the health. 

For example, some fellows allow them- 
selves to fall behind in their studies a little, 
and then try to make up their lessons by 
alternately studying and sleeping till about 
3 A. M., and appear the next day knowing 
but little more and feeling decidedly 
worsted iu the encounter ; such men are 
very liable to pronounce their studies dull 
and uninteresting. 

The wliole secret, if there be any secret, 
is to make every blow tell, avoid false 
strokes, obtain the best possible conditions 
for your labor, provide yourself with the 
best tools, always keep them in the best 
condition and use them in the best wa}'. 

And right here comes in another factor 
in making our time count, namely, the 
knowing how to use these tools. Let a 
greenhorn take an ax and undertake to fell 
a tree, we all know the result, he will 
probably hack it off, if we give him time 
enough. 

Now it is just as essential to know how 
to study and use the various helps we have, 
as to know how to handle an ax, yet very 
few men ever give it a second thought, but 
pluuge wildly into their work, and expend 
a great amount of energy which counts for 
nothing. 



FOOT-BALL GAMES PLAYED. 
Sept. 27 — Trinity vs. Aggie on Aggie Campus. 
Oct. 9 — Amherst vs. Aggie on Blake Field. 



The title page of tliia book was drawn and engraved by 

John Styr;^ss, 



6 Davis Street, 



BOSTON, MASS. 



The various publications of Bates, Bowdolu, Colby, 
Tufts, Mass. Agricultural College, Wellesly and Yale 
have used his work. He will submit sketches and cari- 
catures for your approval. 



OFFICE OF 



EDWARD A. THOMAS, 

Fii|E/t(D Life Iprance /geht, 

REAL ESTATE EOR SALE AND TO LET. 



Office, C'ooJcs BlocJc, Amherst^ Mass, 






KELLOGG'S BLOCK, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Office Hours, 9 to 12 a. m., 1-30 to 5 p. M. 



*S=Ether and Nitrous Oxide Gas administered when 
desired. 



.A.T thie: 



jlMHERST CASH SHOE STORE, 

You can get the most for your money. 
BOOTS AND SHOES, RUBBERS, OVER- 
SHOES, SLIPPERS, TRUNKS, 
AND BAGS. 



REPAIRING NEATLY DONE. 



HAWES & STINSON, 



CASH ROW, AMHERST, MASS. 




AMHERST HOUSE 

LIVERY, FEED, TiND SALE STABLE. 

T.. L PAIGE, Prop'R. 



HACKS TO AND EROM ALL TRAINS, OM- 
NIBUSES, HACKS, DOUBLE AND 
SINGLE TEAMS FURNISHED 
AT SHORT NOTICE. 
CAREFUL DRIVERS. PAIR PRICES. 

A.MBEBST, MASS. 



"ST 





L"- 



Third Season opens October 1 and closes April 1. 



Private and Select Classes at reasonable 
rates. Also, Private Lessons in Eouud 
Dancing and the German. 

For particulars and terms apply to 

A. X. PETIT, 

Box 3SS, Aii'.Jierst, Mass. 
Residence, Cor. Triangle and East Pleasant Sts. 



Mass, Agijicultural College, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHERST, MASS. 

We would inform the friends of the college, 
and the public generally, that we are prepared 
to supply 

PRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND 

SHRUBS, SMALL FRUITS AND 

PLANTS, 

true to name, also 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 
all at the lowest price. 
For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and Small 
Fruits, address. 

Prof. S. T. Maynard, 

AMHERST, MASS 



THE AMHERST 



FURNITURE TiND CARPET STORE. 



A complete line of goods suited to the students' 
wants. 

BEDSTEADS, MATTRESSES, PILLOWS, 



STUDY DESKS AND CHAIRS, 
LOUNGES, 



WINDOW SHADES, DRAPERIES, 

CARPETS, RUGS, ETC., ETC., 



All goods Strictly Casli and at Iioivest Prices. 



E. D. MARSH, 



10 PHOENIX ROW, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Sheet JVIoasic, 



Music Books 



Strings 

FOR THE VIOLIN, BANJO, GUITAR, 

— AT 

Cushman's Music Store, 



I7OWES ^ I^ELIiOGG, 



DEALERS IN 



J. M, WAITE k SON, 



AND DEALERS IN 



Hats, Caps, Furs, Trunks, Bags, Furnishing Goods, 

Latest Styles in Furnishings. Agent for 

Knox's and Youman's Hats. Sole 

Agent for Pittsiield 

Laundry. 

Hats Repaired. Furs renovated 

Give us a call before purchasing. 
NO. S FBCENIX SOW, AUrSJEBST, ST^iSS. 



%m\jitxBt MouBz, 



o 

AMHEEST, MASS. 



The undersigned is pleased to announce 
to his former patrons and others desiring 
Game Spreads or Dinners, that he is always 
prepared to accomodate (at short notice) 
large or small parties. 

Ample dining room capacity for 200 peo- 
ple. 

LORENZO CHASE, Prop'R. 

.^DENTISTS, o). 

C. S. GATES, D. D. S. 
T. G. HUN^TINGTON^, D. D. S. 

CTrTZER'S BLOCK, AMHEXST, MASS. 



OFFICE HOURS : 
9 A.. I»I. TO S F. I«I. 

Ether and Nitroii.s Oxide administered when 
desired. 



^•STUDEI]T'g gUPPLIES-^ 

FANCY CtROCERIES, CROCKERY, CIGARS, 

CIGARETTES, TOBACCO, FRUITS 

AND CONFECTIONERY, 

LftlQP gOODg ftl^D KE!{OSEI]E OIL, 

SDoors South of P. O., - AMMERST, MASS. 



EDWIN NELSON, 

Books and Stationery, 

Next door to Post Office, 
AMHERST, MASS. 



WOOD'S HOUSE 

HMJS LKESSIIJS l^OOEQg, 

Razors Honed and Shears Sharpened at 
short notice. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



G. R. KENFIELD, 

^■JEWBLBl^,-^ 



Wood's liJoch, 



Anther St, Mass. 



SPECIAL. 



A Stem Wiiul and Set Waltliam, Hampden, Elgin or II 
linois niovcnient in a Gold Filled Case for $15.00. 



Umljrellas covered while you wait, also dealer 
in Gnns, Rifles, Ammunition and Sporting Goods 
of all kinds. Amateur Photographic Outfits and 
Supplies. Views and Pictures taken when de- 
sired. Views of Amherst and Vicinity for sale. 
Call and see before purchasing elsewhere. 

«rWATCH AND CLOCK REPAIRING A SPECIALTY.=«3!r 



J. L. LOVELL, 

-3lPHOTO&]^ftPHB]^,6>' 

DRY PLATES, COMPOUND DEVELOPER 

AND SENSITIZED PAPER, READY 

FOR USE. 



PRINTING FOR AMATEURS 

Done in the'hest manner. 



AMMEKST, MASS. 



H.O, P 



H 



H 



piercW Tailor, 



-AavrnEPiST, 



3Vr.A.SS. 



el. p. FJaWSON, 



DEALEK IN 



WftT0HBS, gLOKKg, JBWELI^Y, 

FINE POCKET CUTLERY, SILVER AND 

PLATED WARE, OPTICAL GOODS, 

CANES, SPORTING AND 

FANCY GOODS, 

Gold Pens, Fine Stationery. 



REPARING NEATLY and PROMPTLY DONE. 



AMHERST, MASS. 



DWIGHT fflOOI^B, 



BILLIARD AND POOL 



F.A.PLJ_.OR., 



5 IPJitrnix Row ( JJp-stnirs ) ^ 
AMHERST, MASS, 



AGGIE LIFE. 



VOL. 



AMHERST, MASS., OCTOBER 29, 1890. 



No. 3 



WHERE DO YOU BUY m\ 

Meerschaum Pipes? 
French Briar Pipes? 
Choice Tobacco? 
Sponges? 
Soap? 

Hair Brushes from 25 cts. up? 
Combs from 5 cts. up? 
Choice New York Confectionery? 
Sliaving Mugs? 
Shaving Soap? 
Latlier iBrushes? 

Cigarettes, fresli every two weeks? 
Tlie Best Soda in America? 
The Best Bay Rum? 
Imported Pei'fnmes? 
Prescriptions prepared by licensed pharmacists? 
Imported Domestic Tooth Bruslies? 

If you liave not obtained these necessaries at 
DEUEL'S DRUG STORE, you have begun 
wrong. Deuel's is the leading Drug Store in 
Western Mass., and keeps the largest assort- 
ment of goods at bottom prices. 



w 



S DRU& STORE 

Ainliersl House Block, Amiierst Mass. 



HENRY ADAMS, 



PHARMACIST, 



NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Pure Drags and iMedicines, 

EANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORT- 
ED AND DOMESTIC CIGARS, 
CIGARETTES, ETC., 
MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, 
FISHING TACIvLE AND SPORTING GOODS, 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, and Sporting 
and Springfield Rifles. 

Sunday and night calls responded to at resi- 
dence, first door west of Wood's Hotel. 



(brugs, Medicines, 

TOILET ARTICLES, 

CONFECTIONERY, CIGARS, CIGARETTES, 

AND SMOKERS' GOODS. 



I'MYSICI.-INS' FMBSCRIPTIONS CAltB- 
FULjyiT COMPOUNDED, 

AT ■ 

6.PHCENIX ROW. 

Order j'our COAjL here. 



THOUGHTS ON READING. 

It is said that a man may be known by 
the books he reads as well as by the com- 
pany he keeps ; and true it is that much 
may be conceived concerning a man's char- 
acter, by a knowledge of the literature 
with which he gratifies his mind. 

"Knowledge dwells 
In heads replete with thoughts of other men. " 

When one reads and studies the works 
of a noble author, his mind is enlarged ; he 
meets thoughts which correspond to those 
of his own mind, but which previous to 
that time he had not given expression to, 
and now they become a part of his real 
knowledge and are stored up in the memory 
for future use. He feels that in this book 
he has found a friend, and the acquaint- 
ance thus foimed is a lasting one. 

It beliooves us then to make companions 
of only those books that will be of some 
use to us, either in meeting some immediate 
want of the intellect or building up charac- 
ter and stimulating us to lives of greater 
useCuluess, rejecting, as in the choice of I 
companions among men, all that are not | 
ennobling and elevating in their influence. | 

A knowledge of books is one of one best 
introductions to society. Rarely do we 
see one holding a permanent position in 
refined society who has not some kuowl- 
edgeof the literary world about him. This 
knowledge, besides bringing a person into 
closer sympathy- with a more highly cul- 
tured class of people, refines the taste and 
lifts his own mind to a higher plane of 
thought. 

Reading, when conducted in a scholarly 
manner, is a most productive source of 
wisdom. Too often, reading is but a pas- 
sive reception of other men's thoughts. 
To read with profit, the mind should be j 
applied with all diligence ; the intellect 
should be active in studying the thoughts of 
the author, comparing, and classifying them 
with its own material, so that when the 
reader wishes to impart ideas to another, 
he will have words in which to clothe them 
that they may have weight according to 
their importance. This may be called cre- 
ative reading, and the earlier in life it is 
attained the more useful will books become. 

Knowledge thus gained is the power that 
raises many a man to fame and distinction, 
who would otherwise toil through lite un- 



noticed and of little use to those around 
him. 

Creative reading is a natural method of 
stimulating the mind to original production ; 
accordingly, the custom has been for the 
great writers of literature in all ages to 
consult their favorite authors just before 
sitting down to their own tasks. 

The college education is said to be the 
reading of certain books which represent 
the science accumulated by other men, and 
when the course of study is completed, the 
student's opinion should be of some value. 
Here again comes in the importance of 
reading thoughtfully. A lesson is not 
learned by simply reading it over in a pas- 
sive mood ; it is only when the axioms of 
the writer are carefully weighed and applied 
to actual cases by persistent thought, that 
the material of the book becomes of practi- 
cal use to the student. 

Some students can, by simply reading a 
lesson over once or twice, repeat large 
portions of it word by word, but do they 
really learn the lesson? Is it not a mere 
repetition of words which have no practical 
value as truths to the mind of the student? 
In reading another man's production, the 
words should be studied only as a means 
for finding the truth the writer would con- 
vey ; but even when this is ascertained, it 
should not at once be taken for granted ; 
all writers are not authorities, therefore, it 
is well to ask the question, am I to believe 
the statements of this author or not? Prove 
everything in your own mind before accept- 
ing it as truth. 

If the writer makes use of unfamiliar 
words as best suited, to his purpose, so 
much the better for the reader, provided he 
will avail himself of the opportunity to 
increase bis vocabulary by taking pains to 
look up the meaning of all obscure words. 

There is danger of reading so long as to 
get absorbed and forget the purpose of the 
perusal. Skip over those parts of the book 
that will be of no use, and when you come 
to what meets your wants, dwell upon it, 
make it your own. All parts of a book are 
not of equal importance to all readers; 
what one will choose, another will reject. 

We who have little time for reading 
should study how we can make that little 
the most profitable. It is said that Gibbon 
made a practice of examining himself be- 



i8 



AGGIE LIFE. 



fore and after reading, to see what he 
really gained by the process. So we in 
reading an essay or a booli should first ask 
ourselves what we know about the subject 
and what onr thoughts concerning it are, 
and then after obtaining the writer's idea, 
analyse ourselves again to see what pro- 
gress we have made. 

Bacon says " Reading maketh a full 
man, conference a ready man and writing 
an exact man." The three go together, for 
although one may be able to confer and 
write much from his own personal observa- 
tion and practical experience, life is too 
short for a man to demonstrate every truth 
for himself, and in order to be "full" of 
ideas, he must have accumulated some 
from the demonstrations of those who hav- 
ing gone before, have left books as the 
lasting monuments to their labors. 

This is an age of extensive libraries ; 
books are multiplying daily. The mind 
that would keep pace with the literary 
progress must needs be active. But incur 
eagerness to devour the new books, let us 
not forget the Book of Books, the one that 
has had more influence than any other in 
shaping characters in all ages. 



SYSTEM OF MARKING. 

How often, tovpard the end of the terra, 
do we hear students express a determina- 
tion to "'cram" for the approaching exam- 
inations, in order to obtain a good mark? 

A large majority of our students do this. 
To be sure it does no harm in itself, but 
what is learned in this way, is as quickly 
forgotten, and the time and energy are 
spent simply to obtain a mark. 

A student under our system of marking, 
who has seldom prepared his lessons well 
during the term, can by cramming duri'ng 
the latit few weeks, obtain almost as good 
a mark, as those who learn each lesson 
faithfully. 

Of course we don't claim that all do this, 
but it is well to put all temptation out of 
the way. Now it is apparent that a sys- 
tem based upon daily recitations would en- 
tirely stop this demoralizing practice, and 
it would also tend to keep every student 
down to systematic work. This system is 
in operation in many of our public schools, 
where it works admirably. 

Again, where those students who receive 
a good mark in the daily recitations are 
excused from the final examinations, those, 
who have not come up to the standard are 
obliged to take examinations, as under the 
old system. Now of course, no one with 
any ambition, will allow himself to be classed 



among the laggards, and so will study hard 
for the required mark. 

There is another noticeable fault with the 
marking ; that is, the wide difference in the 
marks given for the same proportionate 
amount of work in the variousdepartments! 
This can hardly be reduced to rules, but as 
it now stands one professor marks very 
low and close and another very high, while 
perhaps the majority strike the happy me- 
dium. We donotcomplaiu of unjust marks ; 
we simply would like to see more uniform 
marking in the departments, as related to 
each other. 

Now a man may put considerable extra 
study in one department and receive no 
higher mark, prehaps, than in another de- 
partment where he has almost no interest. 

When our reports are sent home we are 
questioned as to why we don't receive higher 
marks in our favorite studies. 

If there is a weak spot in a system of 
marking, a student will take advantage of 
it, otherwise he goes contrary to nature, 
which is a thing all students endeavor to 
avoid. 



OUR MUSICIANS. 
Formerly the east entry of the north dor- 
mitory was considered one of the quietest 
spots in the whole college. Now a great 
change has been wrought, for the quiet dis- 
position has been entirely superseded by 
many of the occupants desiring to manip- 
ulate some musical instrument, thereby ren- 
dering life exceedingly disagreeable for 
those less fortunate in this respect. In the 
early morning we are awakened from our 
peaceful rest by a sort of reveille, which 
reveals to us, as we gradually regain our 
senses, that some aspiring drummer is try- 
ing to perfect himself in his art. As the 
day advances and we are endeavoring to 
concentrate our thoughts on some difficult 
selection in Rhetoric, or perchance we have 
not fully mastered some complicated prob- 
lem in mathematics, when the sound of a 
cornet, mingled with the discordant notes 
of an alto horn fall upon the' ear, and per- 
haps to make a little variety some one very 
thoughtfully pounds on the bass drum. So 
the concert continues only to be interrupted 
by the ringing of the cjiapel bell, which 
summons us to prayers and recitations, and 
prevents further practice for the remainder 
of the morniiig. During the afteruoon we 
have little cause to complain, for most of 
us spend the greater portion of it outdoors 
engaged in a game of foot-ball or tennis, 
or perhaps, the more industrious of us use 
our time to better advantage by working 



what spare hours we have. As night ap- 
proaches, however, we return from work 
and sport much refreshed, resolving to im- 
prove the Opportunity and accomplish a 
good evenings work ; but, we no sooner get 
under way, than our newly organized col- 
lege band strikes up some mournful strain 
and dispenses music gratuitously to the 
occupants of the whole dormitory. We all 
enjoy this very much and probably shall 
enjoy it still more when they can play 
something besides "America" ; so the con- 
cert continues, and as we retire for the 
night, disgusted with such proceedings, 
we are hushed to sleep by the old familiar 
tune of "Nearer My God to Thee". Now 
we do not wish to criticise these men, for 
a college band is an honor to the institu- 
tion, and it is earnestly hoped that it will 
equal the drum corps in this respect, but 
we do have one request to make, and that 
is, that our musicians confine their practice 
to such portions of the day, as will not in- 
terfere materially with study hours. 



THE BENEFITS OF ATHLETICS IN 
A COLLEGE. 

While the preeminent idea in a college, 
in regard to athletics, may be to put teams 
on the field to compete with other colleges 
which will be strong enough to obtain the 
most victories, yet this should not be all. 
Even if a college cannot put what are called 
winning teams on the field, it is better for 
the students to support in a hearty manner 
the best teams that can be produced among 
them, than for the institution to be without 
a representative in the athletic line. 

The amount of good that athletics will 
do in a college does not lie wholly in the 
number of victories credited to the various 
teams, but largely in the benefits derived 
by the greater part of the students in the 
work of practicing the 'varsity and class 
teams. While only a limited number can 
belong to the 'varsity teams, nearly all can 
engage in practice games and contests be- 
tween classes, societies, clubs, etc. As has 
been proved to the entire satisfaction of 
nearly all, athletics provide a most com- 
plete means for the development of a strong 
constitution among college students, which 
should always accompany a good mind. 
During the past twenty-five years, athletics 
have been largely introduced into American 
colleges, and the results have been very 
beneficial, as is attested by the position in- 
structors take, and by the noticeable im- 
provement made in the physique of edu- 
cated men as a class. Although athletics 



AGGIE LIFE. 



19 



create a sort of an eas3'-goiug, rollick-some 
nature in those that participate, they may 
be of great ladvantage to one in the acquire- 
ment of many of those rare attributes of an 
ideal man, such as sol (-control, tact, brav- 
ery, and the quick action of mind and body. 
The practice of training which is pursued 
in an athletic team cannot but prove to be 
of great value to those coming under its 
discipline. The need of trained men has 
often been felt in times of great importance 
and the want of them has more than once 
proved of great cost to nations, parties, 
and movements of reform. 

There is also no doubt but that the in- 
creased attention to athletics in colleges is 
having a beneficial effect on the moral 
standing, as they tend to systematize the 
habits of students and check dissipation. 
It is probably through the influence of ath- 
letics more than anj'thing else that hazing 
and property destroying by college students 
has been abandoned. These are only some 
of the many prominent benefits to be de- 
rived by the students from athletics occu- 
pying a conspicuous place in the college. 
Therefore, let us not look so exclusively to 
the number of victories our teams win, but 
also consider the benefits that the training 
of those teams has been to the whole col- 
lege, and especially to all those who have 
been participants in this work. If this idea 
is carried out, tnoi'e men will be practicing 
and some of the valuable material that is 
now latent will become developed, and our 
students will be surprised at the increased 
quality of their athletic teams. When our 
teams do not win let us not feel discouraged 
but let us show that we appreciate what the 
men have done, and help them to prepare 
tliemselves better for future contests. 

But this is only part of our work, for we 
should come forward and help as much as 
possible in defraying the expenses of our 
teams which largely represent the college 
before the world. If students would only 
stop and consider what benefit athletics 
have been to them, and what increased ben- 
efits they might receive, if thej' were only 
entered into with the proper spirit, the 
individual support, and the pecuniary- aid 
would be double what it is now. 



THE TRIP TO BURLINGTON, VT. 
Fifteen of the "Aggie" students, includ- 
ing the foot-ball team, the business mana- 
ger and releree, set out for Burlington, 
Thursday night, Oct. 23d. at eight o'clock, 
p. M. From Amherst to Brattleboro, where 
we first changed cars, the time passed off 
very rapidly, as the dullness was overcome 



by banjo music, together witii vocal exer- 
cises by the whole company. The thirty 
minutes we had to wait in Brattleboro 
together with the time we waited there 
on our return, gave us ample time to 
take a good stroll over the town. As we 
rolled on from Brattleboro to Bellows 
Falls, some of the company even indulged 
in a few minutes sleep, but were soou dis- 
turbed by a second change of cars. Now 
we thought we were settled for the night 
and would have slept, if it had been possi- 
ble, but we soon gave it up in disgust and 
everyone was kept awake, as a result of 
the energy expended in free entertain- 
ments. A little after two o'clock we 
reached Rutland and found it necessary to 
change cars a third time. At last we 
reached Burlington about 5-30 a. m., where 
we immediately took the bus for the Bur- 
lington Hotel and retired for a few hours 
of solid rest. Some arose in time for a 
short riimble about the city before dinner 
time. 

Right liere a word mav be said of Bur- 
lington. To all appearances it is a very 
neiit and pretty little place. Its most 
pleasing feature being its location, slightly 
elevated and overlooking the great Lake 
L'hamplain. 

The U. V. M. buildings are very hand- 
somely located on a hill ; the university 
possesses one of the best libraries in the 
vicinity. 

After dinner we prepared for the game, 
which was said to be the most exciting 
one of the season. At night we were all 
willing to retire for a good night's rest, 
getting up in the morning much refreshed. 

Now the beauty of the trip begins. We 
left Burlington at 8-15 o'clock a. m. and 
©ur attention was well taken up by the 
beautiful view across the lake to the im- 
mense suow covered peaks of the Adiron- 
dacks in N. Y. This continued for some- 
time down the lnke, until we began to leave 
the Adirondacks, and near the Green 
Mountains, when we could see the tower- 
ing peaks in the distance on either hand. 
But our attention was now drawn to attrac- 
tions nearer at hand. 

An artificial forest may be worthy of 
mention, although there were natural forests 
on every hand and the deep hue of the 
foliage added much to their beauty. 

Herds of live stock of various kinds were 
seen feeding on the various hills. As we 
neared the lime -stone regions immense 
marble quarries, which were located all 
along between the high peaks attracted our 
attention. Passing through the lowlands 



and valleys above Rutland, we were curious 
to know how they did their haying, as 
large tracts of land were completely sub- 
merged in water, we being able to see only 
the tops of fences, and now and then a 
mowing machine or a horse-rake sticking 
out of the watei'. 

Looking off in almost any direction, 
through the valleys, between the peaks and 
on the slopes, we can see some superb 
natural scenery. As we move along and 
pass this beautiful scenery we arrive at 
Bellows Falls, where we come to the noted 
scenery of the Connecticut valley, which 
we need not mention here. We reached 
Amherst at 4-40 p. m., a tired company, 
but the time seemed to pass very quickly 
and all felt well paid for returning in the 
dav time. 



BATTALION ORGANIZATION. 

Commandant of Cadets, First Lieut. Les- 
ter W. Cornish, Fifth U. S. Cavalry. 
Cadet Major Ruggles. 

" Adjutant Brown. 

" Quartermaster Gay. 

" Sergeant Major Crane. 

" Quartermaster Sergeant Holland. 

COMPANY A. 

Cadet Captain Magill. 

" First Lieutenant Shores. 
" Second Lieutenant Sawyer. 
" First Sergeant Clark. 
" Sergeant Beals. 
" Corporal Emerson. 

COMPANY B. 

Cadet Captain Paige. 

" First Lieutenant Howard. 
" S'econd Lieutenant Felt. 
" First Sergeant Stockbridge. 
" Sergeant Boyntou. 
" Corporal Graham. 

COMPANY c. 

Cadet Captain Legate. 
" First Lieutenant Hull. 
" Second Lieutenant Fames. 
" First Sergeant Thomson. 
" Sergeant Rogers. 
" Corporal Hubbard. 

COMPANY D. 

Cadet Captain Carpenter. 
" First Lieutenant Field. 
" Second Lieutenant Johnson. 
" First Sergeant Willard. 
" Sergeant Taylor. 
" Corporal Plumb. 

COLOK GUARD. 

Cadet Sergeant Smith. 
" Corporal Lyman. 
" Corporal Field. 
" Corporal Deuel. 
Chief Musician, and Cadet First Sergeant 

Drum Corps, Fletcher. 
Fire Marshal, and Cadet First Lieutenant, 
Horner. 



20 



AGGIE LIFE. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Published Fortuightly by the Students of the 
Mass. Agricultural College. 



Terms $1,00 per year, in advance. 



Single copies, 10c. 



Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 

BOAJtD O-F EHITOMS : 

E. P. FELT, Editor-in-Chief, 
O. V. B. LAGE, Business Manager, 
A. G. EAMES, '91, H. N. LEGATE, '91, 

J. L. FIELD, 'i^3, G. E. TAYLOR, '92, 

G. F. CXJELEY, '93. 



Address all communications to the Business Manager. 



Once more we would call the attention 
of every man to the necessity of writing for 
Aggie Life. To the Freshmen especially, 
we would say, write something if you hiive 
a pen, if not, we will lend you one. Let 
every man understand, that he is expected 
to write, even though he may not have a 
special invitation from the editors. The 
Editors cannot write everything, nor can 
they promise to publish every thing writ- 
ten. 



While general improvements are being 
made in and about the College buildings, 
why would it not be a first-class idea to put 
iron gratings over the excavations in front 
of the basement windows on the east side 
of South College? While as yet no one 
has been seriously injured by falling, 
though sever.al men have stumbled into 
them, it is by no means certain but that 
someone will be, if proper precautions are 
not taken. A feeling has long been cur- 
rent among the students that these grat- 
ings are requisite to personal safety, and it 
is hoped that the matter will receive due 
attention. 



Within the limits of the College history, 
a "Mass. garden" was started on the 
grounds. The question now arises, what 
is a Mass. garden? vSuch a garden consists 
of a tract of land containing specimens of 
all native trees and shrubs growing in the 
state. Now what would be more interest- 
ing or instructive to an observing person 
than to enter such a place? Probably 
every town in the state has some tree or 
shrub which is known only in that locality. 
It will take years to make such a collection, 
but will not the result more than pay for 
the labor and money expended? As was 
stated above, such a project was once en- 
tered upon, but the trustees, desiring to 
build a house on the same locality, caused 
many of the trees to be removed, so that 
for the time being, the most earnest sup- 



porters of the scheme were discouraged. 
But now, being assured af a goodly share 
of the recent national appropriations, they 
are once more actively interested in the 
project, and will undoubtedl}' push the en- 
terprise through with redoubled energy. 



A College song is now called for ; we 
don't want some second hand article, but a 
distinctively Aggie song. We have writers 
of various excellence, even a few poets, 
and we know there are men in College who 
are capable of writing a College song. 
This is something that every man should 
consider, and do all he can toward produc- 
ing a song, that will be an honor to the 
College. Our College songs should be no- 
ble in thought and full of patriotism ; songs 
that will stir a man's soul :ind unite all in 
common bonds of sympathy. Some may 
say this is a high ideal, but that is just 
what we want ; too many miss their high- 
est usefulness in life, simpl3' because they 
aim too low. Let us aim high in our Col- 
lege songs as well as elsewhere. 



Since our last issue, we have learned 
that there is a great probaliility of our hav- 
ing electives, in some form or other, next 
year. It is, however, impossible to state 
just what will be done, until after the 
Board of Trustees meet. There is some 
difficulty at Washington in regard to the 
payment of the money called for by the 
recent act. As soon as this is paid over, 
which will probably be in about three 
weeks, the Trustees will meet to devise 
methods for expending it. The matter of 
electives will be brought up at this meeting, 
and will probably be referred to the Com- 
mittee on Course of Study and Faculty. 
We understand that the Faculty intend to 
recommend that the electives shall be by 
courses, rather than by studies. This has 
the disadvantage of confining the student 
entirely to one branch of study, but is per- 
haps, all things considered, the best ar- 
rangement which can be made. 



Since the gas fixtures were taken awaj' 
from the basement and bath-rooms we have 
been left in darkness, not total, for there 
is still one solitary lamp in the basement, 
but in the bath-rooms there is a total lack 
of all light-giving objects. Perhaps the 
gas arrangements were unsatisfactory and 
unheallhful but they nevertheless fulfilled 
the purpose for which they were intended. 
As it is now if the students use the bath- 
rooms in the evening, they are obliged to 
take the lamp from the other part of the 



basement ; and if there is more than one 
bather at a time the second one is obliged 
to bring a lamp from his room, which is 
exceedingly inconvenient if he rooms in 
North College, or takes the alternative of 
bathing in the dark. Why could not the 
chapel electric wire be continued to the 
basement? This would afford a very con- 
venient and efficient means of lighting both 
the basement and the bath-rooms. If this 
can not be done then surely lamps can be 
furnished, but by whatever means, let us 
have more light on the subject. 



Another thing in connection with the 
bath tubs : let it be remembered that they 
are not made for laundry purposes, and 
whoever it may be that wishes to put his 
clothes to soak in the future, put them 
somewhere else than in a bath tub. 



The Willistonian feels ver}' badly be- 
cause we will not play Williston at foot- 
ball this fall. Manager Moseley's "long- 
consultation" with Horner lasted about five 
minutes. It was after our game with Trin- 
ity, the 29th of Sept., and Capt. Hull was 
not present at the interview even that 
length of time. Horner and Hull both in- 
formed Moseley that the directors of our 
Foot-ball association had decided at their 
first meeting not to have any game with 
Williston this season. Horner did not tell 
Moseley that he would arrange two dates 
for him, but owing to tlie latter's importu- 
nity, he did say that he would consult the 
directors again. The flat refusal at first of 
both captain and manager should have 
been enough, and Hull thinking so, told 
Horner to let the matter rest there. In 
about two weeks Horner received a letter 
from Moseley asking again for dates. This 
was promptlj' refused. Our esteemed con- 
temporary forgets that the Williston man- 
ager was told by ours that the reason we 
would not play them was the ungentlemanly 
treatment we had received at their hands 
and our desire to avoid the hard feeling 
generally growing out of Aggie-Williston 
games. The comparing of Williston's and 
Aggies' respective scores against the Am- 
herst 'varsity proves nothing, for Amherst 
played at Eastliampton with a team com- 
posed largely of subs, while against us, 
she put up the same team that played 
against Harvard next day. Stagg, when 
here with his team the 18th, said that our 
team not only played a far more gentle- 
manly game, but were also superior to Wil- 
liston in points of play, and Stagg is a man 
who is in a position to know. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



21 



In view of approucliiug cold weather, we 
would call the atteutiou of the college 
authorities to a matter that comes up every 
year, aud whioh, as yet, iias never received 
attention. This is the troulile that arises 
every winter on account of the windows 
broken in the gynir.asium. These have 
mostly been broken by balls used in play- 
ing tennis, base-ball aud hand-ball. The 
result is, that after a few windows have 
been broken, the students are prohibited 
from indulging in these sports inside of the 
hall. This action has always caused dis- 
satisfaction and is not desirable, as the 
means for taking exercise in the winter 
time are rather limited. This matter can 
easily and cheaply be remedied by putting 
proper screens over the windows. A 
careful estimate of the cost of screening 
all the windows, shows that good wire 
screens, with frames which could be easily 
removed in the summer, could be put on 
for about fifteen dollars. These would not 
interfere at all with the gymnasium being- 
used for drilling purposes. As the screens 
would be an improvement to the bnilding, 
and would be a part of its fixings, the stu- 
dents do not feel that it is their duty to 
bear the expense of having them put on. 
It would be an improvement that would be 
more highly appreciated by them, than most 
any other, involving the same amount of 
money. As complaint has already begun 
to come in from the officer in charge. of the 
buildings concerning broken windows, we 
hope that the matter will be attended to by 
the pioper authorities as soon as possible, 
and thus put a stop to the trouble that will 
be sure to rise throughout the winter, unless 
remedied in the above mentioned manner. 
We accept with high appreciation the 
improvements which have been made dur- 
ing the last year, and we earnestly hope 
that this needed addition will be forthcom- 
ing before long. 



GLEANINGS. 

Banking celery is all the rage now. 

Staples says, dry alcohol looks wet. 

Why does Babbit carry a nursing-bottle? 

Fletcher has moved back to Mr. Bangs'. 

The Sophomores raised a breeze, when 
they went to Sugar Loaf. 

The new uniforms will be completed in a 
few weeks. 

Details from the battalion are having 
target practice on fair days. 

The competitive drill for the honor of 
color company will occur the last of this 
term. 



C. H. Parker, fbrnierly of '93, si)ent a 
few days among us last week. 

Oct. li'itli Prof. Brooks was suddenly 
taken ill while lecturing to '93. 

Walker, Perry and H. J. Harlow spent 
a few days at home last week. 

Legate himed his knee last week while 
playing foot-liall, hut not seriously. 

Benlley, '94, leaves College this week. 
We understand that ill health is the cause. 

We hope the Owl Club will have an ini- 
tiation soon, as several Freshmen want to 
join. 

The Owl Club seems to be rubbing off 
the sharp corners. It is a good thing ; let 
the good work go on. 

Prof. W . to class : Such a substance as 
Ferric Carbonate does not exist. Davis :— 
please, what is the formula. 

Where is our flag? We frequently hear 
that question as a man gazes on the flag- 
pole. No one gives a reason. 

Senior essays on the AVest Point trip are 
due next Monday. Essays under Dr. 
Walker due a week from to-day. It never 
rains, but pours. 

He was caught cribbing, 
A lazy student, with a hanily book, 
His place in class one day he took. 
The Professor gave him a sudden look, 
And he the Prof's, presence, then forsook. 

The W. I. L. S. bad a very lively dis- 
cussion on capital punishment. Tlie Fresh- 
men and Sophomores are working well for 
those prizes. 

Last Friday night the W. I. L. S., ow- 
ing to some of the regular speakers being- 
absent, debated extemporaneously on the 
advisability of early marriages. 

The Aggie-Springfield game was wit- 
nessed by several of our alumni. Sellew 
and Copeland, both '89 men, were witnesses 
of the game, besides some of the post 
graduates. 

Dr. W-11-ng-t-n to Freshmen : Now take 
this all down. He gives it slowlj', they take 
it verbatim. 

Dr. W. It reads pretty good, don't it? 
Well it is all wrong. 

Purdue University has three Seniors, 
twelve Juniors and thirty-two Sophomores 
taking a course in electrical engineering ; 
besides these, there are three post-gradu- 
ates doing work in electricity. 

Wednesday, Oct. 15. The afternoon 
was a half-holiday by special request. 
Some students went to the Amherst Ath- 
letic Field Day sports, others to the Bel- 
chertown fair, which the drum corps also 
attended. 

Although we were beaten the 18th, the 
game was very satisfactory. The Spring- 
fields are gentlemen in every respect. 
There was no hard feeling nor a trace of 
slugging. It is a pleasure to play against 
such a team. 



J-n-t-r. That grate will be one dollar . 

Student. There is Prex and Lieut., I 
will ask them. I thought the College fur- 
nished grates and stoves. He starts to see 
them. 

J-n-t-r. Hold on ; we'll call it square 
this time. 

Oct. 22d, a meeting of those interested 
in a Natural History Society was held in 
Prof. Brooks' recitation room at 3 p. m. 
They elected Shores '91 Pres., Taylor '92 
Sec, and appointed. a committee of three to 
report at the next meeting with a suitable 
constitution. 



FOOT-BALL. 



The game Saturday, the 18th, between 
our team and the School of Christian 
Workers of Springfield was as follows : 



SPRINGFIELD. 




AGGIB. 


Black, 


right end, 


E. C. Howard, 


Barton, 


right tackle, 


H. M. Howard, 


Smith, 


right guard. 


Graham, 


Nalsmith, 


centre. 


L6gate, 


Van Leuvin, 


left guard, 


Euggles, 


Sanford, 


left tackle, 


Crane, 


Kallenburg, 


left end, 


Carpenter, 


Keller, 


quarter-back 


, Rogers. 


Ball, 


left half, 


Fletcher, 


Fleming, (Seerley,)right half, 


Hull, 


Stagg, 


full-back, 


Starr. 



Referee, Wlllard. 

Umpire, Paige, both of Aggie. 

The first touch-down was made by Van 
Leuvin for Springfield after a long run, and 
a goal was kicked by Stagg. By a series 
of runs the ball is brought near Spring- 
field's goal line and Hull makes a touch- 
down and kicks a goal. Springfields gain 
a few yards on a V rush. Stagg kicks ball 
into crowd, and it goes to H. M. Howard. 
Good run each by Starr and Hull. Spring- 
fields work Vs and bunt rushes without 
much gain. Hull makes a fine rush from 
a catch from Stagg's kick and is downed 
ten yards from Springfield's goal. Touch- 
down for Aggie made by a V. No goal. 
Time called on first half. 10 — 6 in favor 
of Aggie. 

Second half. Seerley plays half-back in 
place of Flemming, injured. By bunts, 
Vs, and running around the ends Spring- 
fields score a touch-down in about twelve 
minutes. No goal. This ties the score, 
10 — 10. Hull makes a good sixty-yard 
kick, Stagg punts it back to Starr, who 
starts to run but loses ball to Van Leuvin, 
who though a lOf sprinter is caught by 
Hull and downed. Aggies get the ball, 
which is kicked by Hull and goes under a 
team. Springfield man makes a plucky 
play and gets it. After a little desultory 
playing .Seerley runs through the line and 



22 



AGG^E LIFE. 



C, H, SANDERSO!(& CO,, 



CASH DEALERS IN 



PII]E SLOTHIIJS;^ 

Hats, Caps, Umbrellas, and Gents' 
Furnishing Goods, 



CASH ROW, 



AMHERST. 



Sy\NDEi|sof( k Thompson, 



CASH DEALERS IN 



Dry and Fancy Goods, 

HOSIERY, RIBBONS, AND SMALL 
WARES OF ALL KINDS. 



AMHERST, MASS. 



BOOTS^SHOES 

FOR EVERYBODY. 



A FINE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, 
BALS. AND CONGRESS. 

A FULL LINE OF 

HTJBBEE, C3-OOIDS, 

FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 

Repairing Done Promptly. 



T. W. SLOAN, 

s v Has If IX ROW. 

S. J, SULLIVAN, 

DEALER IN 

Second- Hand Clothes 

AND 

FURFITUEE. 

(^"Orders promptly attend ed to.,,^ 
P. 0. Box, 319, AMHERST, MASS. 



makes a touch-down. No goaL 14 — 10 
in favor of Spring-fields. Centre field, Ag- 
gie malies some successful Vs, Ruggles, H. 
M. Howard, and Hull go through with the 
ball, which then goes to Stagg's team, who 
lose it, and it is kicked by Hull. Time 
called. In the last half Graham showed 
sand in lying down in front of vSpringfield's 
V time and again. Hull did good'kicking 
and made some fine runs. H. M. Howard 
and Ruggles gained ground eveiy time one 
of them took the ball and went through 
centre. That Carpenter tackled well, goes 
without saying, and he seems to have a 
natural faculty for pursuing a kicked bail. 
Starr played a game supplementary to 
Hull's. He is a good runner but has to be 
careful of his wrist. He has a way, when 
he misses tackle, of taking Iiold of the 
runner's arm and holding on, and no player 
can run far with such a handicap. 

U. V. M., IG; M. A. C, 12. 

The game was called at three p. ii. with 
the ball in possession of U. V. M. After 
six minutes of hard playing Lyman scored 
the first touch-do w'j. A goal was kicked 
making the score 6 — 0. The ball goes to 
the centre of the field and U. V. M. soon 
secures another touch-down from which 
Lyman failed to kick a goal. .Score, 10 — 0. 
Aggie had the ball on the twenty-five yard 
line and by means of a wedge rush carried 
it to the centi'e of the field. A fine run bj' 
Hull advanced it to the twenty-five yard 
line and Ruggles was then able to secure a 
touch-down. Hull kicked the goal but the 
umpire refused to allow it, claiming that 
an Aggie man was off-side. U. V. M's 
ball on the twenty-five yard hue, but Aggie 
secures it on four downs and another touch- 
down is made by Hull. No goal. Score, 
10 — 8. Time was now called. 

At the commencement of the second half 
Aggie had the ball in the centre of the field 
but soon lost it. Aftei a hard fight U. V. 
M. made another touch-down from which a 
goal was kicked. Score, 16 — 8. Aggie 
had the ball in the centre of the field and 
by repeated use of the V succeeded in get- 
ting another touch-down. Trial for goal 
resulted in a failure. Score, 16 — 12. Time 
was called soon after the touch-down. 

For Aggie, Hull made some fiue runs 
and Ruggles and Howard, '91, did some 
good bunt rushing. Carpenter tackled well 
and got down the field well when the ball 
was kicked. Baker did well ,it centre. 

For U. V. M., Lyman made the long 
runs and Babbitt ~and J. Allen blocked 
well. The teams lined up as follows : 





-^^/^ 



Bu,-5mebS is busme.,^. IKAMi WOOD will get up 
Spreads (or the Boys this winter. Send your orders 
right along to get there first. 



M. A. C. STUDENTS SHOULD GO TO 



BLODSETT ^ 

FOR THEIR 



Lftp < 



mmm^- 



AND 



GENTS FURNISHING GOODS, 



Laundry Agency also. 



JOHN MULLEN, 



-DEALER IN- 



MEATS and PROVISIONS, 

VEGETABLES OF ALL KINDS IN SEASON, 

FISH AND OYSTERS, FOREIGN 

AND DOMESTIC FRUITS, 

AND CANNED 

GOODS. 

Palmer's Block, Main Street. "; 



E. R. BENNETT, 
Jeweler, 

Optician, 

Watchmaker. 

FINE GOODS! LOW PRICES! 

GOOD WORK WARRANTED. 

First Door from Post Office. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



23 



o , 





COLLEGE TAILOR, 



Successor to F, H, Budding & Co.. Amherst Tailors 



I 



Wiiiler Overcoats to leasure, 



ORDERS TAKEN FOR SUITS AND 



OVERCOATS, FULL DRESS 



SUITS TO ORDER, 



GENTS' FURNISHING DEPARTMENT, 
COLLARS, CUFFS and TIES, 
SUSPENDERS >ND UNDERWEAR. 

Foot-Ball and Gpnasium Goods. 



J. B. BRIIN^E 



Merchants' Row, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



M. A. C. ■ U. V. M. 

E. C. Howard, right end J. Allen, 
H. M. Howard, right taclcle, Grow, 
Graham, right guard, C. Hawley, 

Baker, centre, Bingham, 

Ruggles, left guard, WlUard, 

Crane, left tackle, H. Hawley, 

Carpenter, left end, Farren, 

Fletcher, quarter-back, C. Allen, 

Parker, right half, Babbitt, 

Hull, (Capt.) left half, Benedict, 
Starr, full-back, Lyman, (Capt.) 

Referee, Willard of M. A. C. 

Umpire, Stearns of U. V. M. 
E. C. Howard was substituted by Hen- 
derson at the beginning of the second half. 



ALUMNI. 

A. C. McCloud, '90, reported last Mon- 
day to the Thomson-Houston Electric Light 
Co., Lynn, Mass. 

F. L. Taylor, '90, Clerking for L. & W. 
R. E., Middlesboro, Ky. 

MARRIAGE. 

James Roswell Blair '89, to Miss Hattie 
T. Buxton, at Peabody, Mass., Oct. 14th. 



SHOULD WE HAVE SUCH A CHAIR 
HERE? 

A subject which is attracting much at- 
tention at the present time in the scientific 
world is the application of electricity to 
the useful arts. Many men, all over the 
world, are working ceaselessly on this man- 
ifold problem, bringing to the labor all 
the resources of trained intellects and orig- 
inal minds. There is a great demand for 
smart, energetic, young men to take posi- 
tions of honor and profit in introducing 
and managing electrical improvements. 
But the necessary education is acquired at 
the expense of so much time and money 
that comparatively few can take advantage 
of the demand. Now we suggest that it 
would be eminently practicable to establish, 
with a part of the money so generously 
granted by the general government, a chair 
of electrical science as an elective, and so 
help to maintain the reputation of the M. 
A. C. for giving at a low cost as good a 
practical education as can be obtained 
anywhere. 



PRAYER MEETING. 

TOPICS. 

Oct. 30. Are we Christians? i John 2 : 3- 

15, C. A. Smith. 
Nov. 2. How to become strong Christians, 

Eph. 6 : 10-18, J. B. Hull. 
Nov. 6. Help in Temptation. Heb. 4: 

14-16, M. Ruggles. 
Nov. 9. Promise Service, Blatt., 7 : 7, W. 

A. Brown. 



MAILS. 
Mail leaves college for P. 0. at 1 p. m. 
and 7 p. m. on week days. On Sunday it 
leaves at 4-45 p. m. At the P. 0. mails 
close as follows : 

Boston, 

7-45, 8-30, 10-15 a.m. ; 4-00, 6-45, 7-45 p.m. 

New York, Western and Southern States, 

7-45, 10-15 A. M. ; 4-00, 6-45, 7-45 p. m. 

Northampton, Springfield and Western 

Massachusetts, 

7-20, 10-15, 10-45 A. M. ; 6-45 p. m. 

Northern way, N. L. Northern, 

8-30 A. M. 

The treasurer will be a't his office from 4 

to 5 p. M. on Saturdays throughout the 

term. 

The museum of natural history will be 
open to visitors from 3 to 4 each afternoon 
excepting Saturday and Sunday. 

The college library will be open from 2 
to 4 p. M. and from 7 to 8 p. m. each day, 
excepting Saturday and Sunday. On Sat- 
urday it will be open from 9 to 12 a. m. and 
from 2 to 4 p. m., and on Sunday from 2 
to 3 p. M. 

President Goodell will be at his office 
from 2 to 4 p. m. every afternoon except 
Saturdav and Sunday. 



AMERICAN COMIC WEEKLIES. 

It has always been a recognized fact that 
Brother Jonathan has a large vein of humour 
in his composition. As a people we are 
desperately in earnest, and always hurry- 
ing forward to the attainment of some 
desired object. Yet even in the midst of 
the struggle of business life, the American 
often finds time to pause and indulge in a 
hearty laugh. This appreciation of the 
comical side of things is one of the bright 
phases of our modern American life. Over- 
strained nerves and tired bodies are often 
more rested and refreshed by some passing 
joke or comical incident than their owners 
realize. 

Thus there has come to be a general 
desire among our people for what, for want 
of a better term, we may call laughter-pro- 
vokers ; which is not satisfied by the ordi- 
nary incidents of every-day life. To fill 
this want the comic weekly, a new form of 
journalism, has come into being. In no 
other country do these comic publications, 
hold so important a place as in our own. 
Enjiland has one comic paper. Punch, but 
in America their name is legion . They are 
the natural offspring of American wit and 
humour, and contain its very essence. No 
pains are spared to make them attractive, 
and they afford each week a m.igazine of 
fun, which is practicably inexhaustible. 



24 



AGGIE LIFE. 



In the larger oaes the illustrations are 
a prominent feature and are executed with 
no small degree of art. But it is the little 
jokes, the short comicalities, and humour- 
ous verses, which form the best portion of 
this weekl3- feast. One of the necessities 
of humor is brevity-. A long humorous 
article must be very humorous or it falls to 
the ground. The publishers of these 
papers recognize this fact, and in conse- 
quence they present very open pages. 

These papers do not find their patrons 
entirely among the idle and useless mem- 
bers of society, who care only for amuse- 
ment. In many a home where everyone 
has an earnest purpose in life, their coming 
is eagerly looked for and gladly welcomed. 
Staid divines and learned professors often 
find as much pleasure in their perusal as 
younger and more frivolous persons. We 
know of nothing so admirably calculated to 
banish a fit of the blues, as the perusal of 
one of these weekly mirth-provokers. 

This appreciation of the humorous is a 
good sign, for no people will be likely to 
become irremediably sordid and money- 
loving, which can take such hearty pleas- 
ure in the comical. That such publications 
have some mission in the world beside 
affording pleasure, we heartily believe. 
Making use of a Hibernicisrn, we say to 
them " may your shadow never grow less. 
Go on, friends Puck and Judge, bringing 
smiles to sorrowful faces, and laughter into 
heavy hearts, so long as such hearts and 
faces exist ; and as you are more or less 
successful so will you be more or less 
worthy of honor." 



IF YOU WANT TO GET OYSTERS IN ANY 
STYLE GO TO 



E. B. ARNOLD'S 

0YgTF4 gftPE, 

Students are attended at sliort notice, 



Open all days of the week until 12 o'clock. 
Sundays from 9 a. m. to 12-30 p. M., and from 
7jP. M. to 11 p. M. 

William's Block, Merchants' Row. 



The title page of this book was drawn and engraved by 

John S±ur4,iSj 



6 Davis Street, 



BOSTON, MASS. 



The various publications of Bates, Eowdoin, Colby, 
Tufts, Mass. Agricultural College, Wellesly and Yale 
liave used his work. He will submit sketches and cari- 
catures for your approval. 



OFFICE OF 



EDWARD A. THOMAS, 

Fii|E p,]} Life Iprance pi^. 

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE AND TO LET. 



Office, CooJcs Block, Amherst^ Mass, 



E, B, DieKII^gOI], D, D, S, 



KELLOGG'S BLOCK, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Office Hours, 9 to 12 a. m., 1-30 to 5 p. M. 



4®-Ether and Nitrous Oxide Gas administered when 
desired. 



.A.rr TUB 



_/MHERST CASH SHOE STORE, 

You can get the most for your money. 

BOOTS AND SHOES, EUBBERS, OVEE- 

SHOES, SLIPPERS, TRUNKS, 

AND BAGS. 



REPAIRING NEATLY DONE. 



HA\VES & STINSON, 



CASH ROW, AMHERST, MASS. 





Third Season opens October 1 and closes ^pril 1, 



Private and Select Classes at reasonable 
rates. Also, Private Lessons in Pound 
Dancing and the German. 

For particulars and terms applj' to 

A. X. PETIT, 

JBooG 282, A.inhe7'St, Mass, 
Residence, Gov. Triangle and East Pleasant Sts. 

Mass, Agijigultural College, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHERST, MASS. 

We would inform the friends of the college, 
and the public generally, that we are prepared 
to supply 

FRirtT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND 
. SHRUBS, SMALL ERUITS AND 
PLANTS, 
true to name, also 

. CUT ELOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

all at the lowest price. 
For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and Small 
Fruits, address. 

Prof. S. T. Maynard, 

AMHERST, MASS 



THE AMHERST 



AMHERST HOUSE 



LIYERl FEED, >ND SALE STABLE, 



T. L. PAIGE, Prop'r. 



HACKS TO AND FROM ALL TRAINS, OM- 
NIBUSES, HACKS, DOUBLE AND 
SINGLE TEAMS FUENISHED 
AT SHORT NOTICE. 
CAREFUL DRIVERS. FAIR PRICES. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



FURTORE^ND CARPET STORE, 



A complete line of goods suited to the students' 
wants. 

BEDSTEADS, MATTRESSES, PILLOWS, 



STUDY DESKS AND CHAIRS, 
LOUNGES, 



WINDOW SHADES, DRAPERIES, 

CARPETS, RUGS, ETC., ETC. 



All goods Strictly Cash and at IJO^vest JPrices. 



E. D. MARSH, 



10 PHCENIX ROW, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Sheet Music. 



Music Books 
Strings 

FOR THE VIOLIN, BANJO, GUITAR, 



Cushman's Music Store, 



A.l^<I:Ia;BK. s T . 



J, M, WAITE k SON, 



AND DEALERS IN 



I7OWES ^ P(BIiLOGG, 

DI4AL1CKS IN 

-STUDEDT'g SUPPLIES'^ 



FANCY GROCERIES, (UiOCKERY. firOAUS, 

CIGARETTES, TOBACCO, FRUITS 

ANT) CONFECTIONERY, 

LftlQP GOODS MID KBI^OgBI^E OIL, 

SJDoors South of r. O., - AMHMMST, MASS, 



ao, p 



H 



H 



Hats, Caps, Furs, Truoks, Bags, Furiiisliioi Goods, 

Latest Styles in Furnishings. Agent for 
Knox's and Youman's Hats. Sole 
Agent for Pittsiielcl . 
Laundry. 

Hats Repaired, Furs Renovated. 

Give us a call before purchasing. 
NO. B PMCENIX MOW, AWSJBMST, MJLSS. 



%mlizxBt Momt, 



o 

AMHEEST, MASS. 



The undersigned is pleased to announce 
to his former patrons and others desiring 
Game Spreads or Dinners, that he is always 
prepared to accomodate (at short notice) 
large or small parties. 

Ample, dining room capacity for 200 peo- 
ple. 

LORENZO CHASE, PROP'R. 

..^DENTISTS. 5,. 

C. S. GATES, D. D. S. 

T. G. HUNTINGTON^, D. D. S. 

CUTLER'S BZOCK, AMITEItST, MASS. 



OFFICE HOUES : 
9 A., ovr. TO S F. JVC. 

Ether and Nitrous (3xide administei'ed when 
desired. 



EDWIN NELSON, 

Books and Stationery, 

Next door to Post Oflice, 
AMHERST, MASS. 



WOOD'S HOUSE 

HfilR DPtE2SII]g WOW 

Razors Honed and Shears Sharpened at 
short notice. 

I^EItlD. F.A.3SrETJDP, 

AMHEEST, MASS. 



O. R. KPJNFTELD, 



Wood's Bloc7c, 



AttiUerstf Mass. 



SPECIAL. 



A Stem Wind and Set Waltham, Hampden, Elyin or II 
linois movement in a Gold Filled Ga.se ior i:^i5.U0. 



Umbrellas covered wliile you wait, also dealer 
in Guns, Rifles, Ammunition and Sporting- Goods 
of all kinds. Amateur Photographic <_)utlits and 
Supplies. Views and Pictures talcen when de- 
sired. Views of Amherst and Vicinity for sa.le. 
Call and see before purchasing elsewhere. 

asrWATCH AND CLOCK REPAIRING A SPECIALTY..^e(r 



J. L. LOVELL, 

DRY PLATES, COMPOUND DEVELOPER 
AND SENSITIZED PAPER, READY 

FOR USE. 



PRINTING FOR AMATEURS 



Done in the best manner. 



AMBEJtSX, MASS. 



pieicM Tailor, 



-A-IVTHCEUST, 



avr.A-ss- 



^. p. FJawson, 



DEALER IN 



WfiTgHES, gLO0K2, JEWELI^Y, 

FINE POCKET CUTLERY, SILVER AND 

PLATED WARE, OPTICAL GOODS, 

CANES, SPORTING AND 

FANCY GOODS, 

Gold Pens, Fine Stationery. 



REPARING NEATLY and PROMPTLY DONE. 



AMHERST, MASS. 



DWIGHT CQooi^E, 



BILLIARD AND POOL 



F».A.R.I_jOrL, 



S Vha'nir Soiv (XTp-stalrs ), 
AMHEKST, MASS, 



AGGIE 




VOL. I. 



AMI-IP^RST, MASS., NOVEMBER 12, 1890. 



No. 4 



WHERE DO YOU BUY YOUI^ 

Meerschaum Pipes? 
French Bnar Pipes? 
Choice Tobacco? 
Sponges? 
Soap? 

Hair Bruslies from 25 cts. up? 
Combs from 5 cts. up? 
Clioice New Yorli Confectionery? 
Sliaving Mugs? 
Sliaving Soap? 
Latlier Brnslies? 

Cigarettes, fresli every two weeljs? 
The Best Soda in America? 
The Best Bay Rum? 
Imported Perfumes? 
Prescriptions prepared by licensed pharmacists? 
Imported Domestic Tooth Brushes? 

If you have not obtained these necessaries at 
DEUEL'S DRUG STORE, yon have begun 
wrong. Deuel's is the leading Drug Store in 
Western Mass., and keeps the largest assort- 
ment of goods at bottom prices. 



DEIL'S DRU& STORE 

Amtierst House Block, Amtierst, lass. 



HENRT ADAMS, 

PHARMACIST, 

NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, - - AMHERST, MASS. 

Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORT- 
ED AND DOMESTIC CIGARS, 
CIGARETTES, ETC., 
MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, 
PISHING TACKLE AND SPORTING GOODS, 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, and Sporting 
and Springfield Rifles, 

Sunday and night calls responded to at resi- 
dence, first door west of "Wood's Hotel. 



<!)■ 



rugs, 



' edi' 



'■es, 



TOILET AR, 
CONFECTIONERY, CIGARS, 

AND SMOKERS' G00± 



rTi'^s, 



PMYSICIANH' PBESCRIFTIONS CAM- 
FUIjIjT COMPOVNDMD, 

AT 

6:PHCENIX EOW. 

Order your COi&.l here. 



STUDENT FAULT-FINDING. 

The iiernicious habit of fault-finding is 
becoming altogether too common among 
those engaged in securing an education. 
Listen to the talk of a group of students, 
and notice how large a part of their con- 
versation consists in criticisms upon the 
method of instruction, length of lessons, 
time allowed, and numerous other topics 
too familiar to need repetition. Criticism 
is an excellent weapon when used in the 
right spirit, and when grievances can be 
remedied by its means ; but the thoughtless 
fault-finding, which passes from mouth to 
mouth, not only fails to lessen the supposed 
evil, but engenders a spirit of hostility and 
discontent, which is unhealthy. 

It is doubtless true that the student has 
just cause for complaint in many instances ; 
but what possible good can come from this 
continual grumbling to one's companions, 
who have no means of exterminating the 
wrong? A friendly appeal to the responsi- 
ble parties will often be the means of 
effecting the desired change. If the griev- 
ance is not of sufficient importance to war- 
rant taking some definite measures towards 
its eradication, it is surely unwise tosow 
seeds of discontent by continually alluding 
to so trivial a matter. Some of the sources 
of complaint seem beyond the power of the 
student to alter, even by thoughtful and 
deliberate means : obviously the right way 
in such a case is to make the best of exist- 
ing circumstances ; and, strange as it may 
seem, the wrong is very apt to appear less 
gigantic in its magnitude, under this treat- 
ment. 

If about to expose some flaw in the in- 
structor, stop to reflect a moment ; it will 
often prevent you from setting yourself up 
as judge over your fellow-man. Remem- 
ber that all men have their faults, and do 
not forget that all men also have their 
virtues. If we should substitute the habit 
>-.f virtue-finding for that of fault-finding, 
-e-^rch would be rewarded by more 
ie returns. Single out the points 
your instructor is well fortified, 
ant strength to build up your own 

educ. vher than use your energies 

in atta, .ihort-comings. 

Charav gely moulded by the influ- 

ences of V nt days ; and the habit 

of finding fi jquired at this time, will 



cling to us through life. The slave to this 
habit tends to overlook the good and to 
discern only the bad. He is ever ready to 
blame another ; and sees more clearly the 
mote in the distance than the omnipresent 
beam. How often we see men, who occupy 
important positions in life, indulging in 
unjust censure of their co-workers ; and 
eagerly grasping every opportunity to 
appease their jealous dispositions b)' find- 
ing faults in their neighbors. Such ten- 
dencies work against co-operation ; and 
the results which might have sprung from 
mutual help, are lost to the community. 

Let every student,, therefore, think twice 
before giving expression to his criticisms ; 
first, are they just? and second, what influ- 
ence will they have upon the listeners? 



A PURPOSE IN LIFE. 

' ' Whither are we drifting on Life's vast resistless 

tide, 
To what distant haven wUl our frail bark glide ? ' ' 

How many a man has felt that which is 
expressed in the above lines ; how often 
has he asked himself: "Is life worth liv- 
ing?" These, my friends, are thoughts 
which will continue to recur and trouble 
you until you have found your purpose in 
life ; until you have made up your mind to 
accomplish that purpose and have under- 
taken the task. 

The man who has something te do is 
happy, when compared with one who sees 
nothing to accomplish. He who has many 
wants experiences pleasure in satisfying 
them, while the man with no desires has 
nothing to be satisfied, hence no pleasure. 

It is claimed by some that there are so 
many different openings offered to college 
men that it is hard far them to choose one 
they will be satisfied with. Are not our 
college men more capable of choosing their 
purposes intelligently than any other class 
of young men? or has the training of their 
minds availed nothing of practical value? 
Friends and parents jnay advise this or 
that pursuit but it remains for you to choose. 

Associating with energetic, wise men 
will help us to choose well. Sometimes, 
contempt for the weaknesses of purpose- 
less characters, with whom we are obliged 
to associate, goads us to determined action. 
We delight in the company of resolute per- 
sons. Such company gives us new deter- 



26 



AGGIE LIFE. 



mination and animates us with new desires. 
At the same time we learn from example 
that nothing can be accomplished before it 
is conceived and then only by persevering, 
energetic effort. Companionship with per- 
sons of energetic, resolute character should 
be courted by those who lack determination, 
for nothing is more conducive to the for- 
mation of good character than association 
with persons of that character. 

The man of resolute purpose is always 
admired, if his purpose is good, while his 
life must be more satisfactory to himself. 
His ideal may not be so high as that of 
some dissolute man, but it is his determi- 
nation which we admire. It is not what a 
man is capable of doing, but what lie does 
that is worthy of admiration. 

Have a purpose to accomplish, and a 
determination to do well whatever is under- 
taken. Be resolved to stick to your object 
till it is gained, or at least till you are sat- 
isfied as to your capabilities for accomplish- 
ing it. 

This purpose should be expansive, grow- 
ing as you grow, and ever opening up new 
ways for your ambition and energy. Do 
not choose a narrow, shallow purpose, but 
rather choose one in which there is room 
for growth, as growth is essential to life. 

The highest purpose in life should be to 
live. But, someone asks, what is it to 
live? To live is to think, to feel, to love, 
to act ; or as it has been beautifully ex- 
pressed, "to live is to keep our sympathies 
in the front rank of human progress ; to 
discipline our courage by every test of 
bravery which God allows ; to navigate the 
world of being and of effort, as ships the 
globe, till we have sailed the full sphere 
of opportunity, touched at every point, 
and voyaged on, until at last the soul, like 
some old argosy freighted with gold and 
spice and marvelous woods strong with 
precious odors, comes sailing, laden with 
the rich experiences of an active life, 
grandly to its home This it is to live." 

But to be able to live thus, we must 
first provide for the wants of the body in 
which the soul is to dwell. In order to 
provide for these, we must work ; and 
about the first thing to decide is what to 
do. Each must decide for himself, accord- 
ing to his aptitude and capability, for what 
occupation he is best fitted. Each and 
everyone of us has a certain limited amount 
of energy to expend, and if directed wisely 
ill one occupation, we may hope to acquire 
an independence that will enable us to 
nurture, culture and enrich the whole soul. 



(K)NIGHT BIRDS. 

In the distant future, as we manfully fol- 
low the plow, or milk (not ride) the goat, 
or extract N. and 0. (see Dr. Goessmann) 
in the shape of sweet "garden sass" from 
the bosom of Mother Earth, we will look 
back with especial pleasure to one feature 
of our life as M. A. C. students. We 
refer to the time when we were members of 
the great and glorious Owl Club. 

Ever since we arrived at college, we had 
heard mysterious hints about tliis owlish 
company. We anxiously inquired what 
the qualifications for membership were, and 
if a Freshman was eligible. We were told 
that candidates for membership were re- 
quired to have a certain amount of gas and 
gall, "And" our informant added, "I guess 
you'll do." 

At this joy filled our hearts. We imag- 
ined ourselves going about in the darkness 
of midnight, in ghostly garments, with 
most unghostly noises, and it seemed as if 
the prospect were too good to be true. We 
acquainted the officers of the club with our 
desire to join. They told us we might 
come in the next night if we could stand 
the initiation. 

It seemed as if the time before the con- 
summation of our desires would never pass 
away. We made three straight flunks in 
our classes and when the Latin professor 
asked us to give the declension of "boy" 
in Latin, we began "Owls, owlis, owls," 
until recalled to our senses by the applause 
of the class. The long-awaited hour at 
last arrived and with it came the owls. 
After the door had been locked behind 
them, we were made to take the oath of 
the club, as follows: "You do solemnly 
swear that jou are possessed of less than 
the average amount of brains, and more 
than the average amount of gall, and are 
thus qualified to become a member of the 
Owl Club." 

They then tested the capacity of our 
skins to hold paint. Finally having given 
a series of yells, somewhat resembling the 
sweet song of the screech-owl, we parted 
for the night. 

The next night we marched, about twen- 
ty stiong, into a Freshnan's room, being 
careful to go when the unsnspei ting victim 
was wrapped iu the arms of Blorpheus and 
playing (with his nasal oi'gans) an accom- 
paniment to the music of the sweet singers 
of the land of Nod or, mayhap tossing 
uneasily on his mattress, as though some 
prescience of the honor that awaited him, 
had reached his rest-seeking senses. 
".Soon rudely are his dreams dispelled," 



his music is replaced by music of another 
kind which, though far less melodious, rivals 
his in volume. The first waking thought 
of the Freshman is : " — those cats I" As 
he catches sight of his visitors, his mind 
reverts to his old study on the Origin of 
Man, and he exclaims: "Now Darwin's 
missing link is found, for none but ape- 
descended progeny could look like this or 
act the fool so natural !" This exclamation 
is lost in the confusion of sounds, luckily 
for him. Ho is then handed roughly out 
of bed and threatened with a ducking iu 
the fountain. His screams for mercy seem 
to move his would-be-ghostly captors, and 
turn them from their purpose. After a 
whispered consultation, they leave twelve 
of their strongest men to hold the Freshman 
whose valor is returning, while the rest 
create such chaos in his room as they can. 
The victim is then warned to keep his hair 
cut short, and with a parting yell, which 
sounds as though an idiot asylum had 
broken loose, we hied us to our rooms, 
divesting ourselves on the way of our very 
appropriate uniforms, which consisted of 
foolscaps, with long ears and white sheets I 
hooked from some poor families' clothes- 
line. 



Mr. Editor : — Sir : Will you kindly 
allow me a short space in Aggie Lire to 
correct a statement, that appeared in the 
issue of Oct. 29th. The military depart- 
ment will be glad to receive at any time, 
and consider carefully any suggestions the 
students. may desire to make, tliat will tend 
in any waj- to their comfort and convenience, 
but those that make any statements for 
the purpose of strengthening their side of 
the question ought to be careful in regard 
to the accuracy of such statements. It 
was stated iu youi last issue that screens 
could be put up at the windows in the gym- 
nasium for $15.00. There are two inac- 
curacies iu this statement ; one is that the 
room in question is a "drill hall" and not 
a gymnasium. It was originally intended 
for purposes of drill, but certain gymnastic 
apparatus was permitted to be put iu, where 
it would not interl'ere with the use of the 
hall for drilling purposes. This apparatus 
was not purchased by college funds, nor do 
I see why screens to protect the windows 
from being broken by tenuis and bose-ball 
should be. Ne\'ertheless. if these screens 
could be put in for $10.00, as was stated, 
they would have been and the expense de- 
frayed by the college, but they cannot. 
A careful measurement of the area to be 
covered bv the wire netting shows that 726 



AGGIE LIFE. 



27 



o 





COLLEGE TAILOR, 



Successor to F. H, Mm & Co., Amiierst Tailors 



Fall aiii Wiiter Suig, 
WMer Overcoats tt iBasiiro, 

ORDERS TAKEN . FOR SUITS AND 

OVERCOATS, FULL DRESS 

SUITS TO ORDER, 



GENTS' FURNISHING DEPARTMENT, 
COLLARS, CUFFS and TIES, 
SUSPENDERS >ND UNDERWEAR 

Foot-Ball and Gpnasiuiii Goods. 



J. B. BRIlSrE 



Merchants' Row, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



sq. feet is the least amount that would 
answer. At five cents per sq. foot, the 
market priue, the cost of the wire alone 
would amount to 136.30. This screening- 
would liave to be placed on frames, that 
extended at least six inches from the wall, 
in order to be any protection to the glass. 
It would take 800 ft. of h^mber six inches 
wide to make the frames. Fifty-six frames 
would have to be made, which would take 
a carpenter several days at $3.50 a day for 
his work, so that the actual cost of wire, 
lumber and labor would probably be near- 
er $60.00 than $50.00, about four times 
the estimate of your correspondent. It 
would be much cheaper for the athletic as- 
sociation or the tennis club to replace the 
glass when it is broken. Windows are 
not even reported when broken so that 
they can be replaced, and thus prevent the 
freezing of the water in the heating appa- 
ratus during a sudden cold snap, an acci- 
deut that might cost the college a large 
amount to repair. These remarks have 
been made in order that a fair view of the 
subject might be presented on the princi- 
ple that there are two sides to every ques- 
tion. If the students wish to put in these 
screens to facilitate their winter sports they 
will no doubt find the faculty willing to 
help them in obtaining the necessary funds. 
Lieut. L. W. Cornish. 



COMMENCEMENT THESES. 

It may look at first glance as if this topic 
were out of place at this time of year, and 
so it would be, if I referred only to Com- 
mencement theses in general, but it is high 
time that the .Senior class looked the sub- 
ject of next June's orations square in the 
face. What shall we choose for our 
themes, and how shall we treat them? Are 
we, as a class, capable of gracing the Com- 
mencement stage as well as the classes that 
have gone before us ? These questions we 
wcRild fain put from our minds a little 
longer, but they are questions that must be 
answered with the burning of the midnight 
oil unless answered soon. 

The other day a member of our Faculty 
said to me, "Nothing is so true an index 
of a man's character as his graduating 
thesis." With this in mind let us not be 
rash in our choice of subjects. If a man's 
tastes are of a high order, and if he takes 
other than a sordid view of life, his essay 
will partake of the intellectual rather than 
of the material. If, on the other hand, his 
whole aim is money making, his produc- 
tion will deal with expediencies for the 
accumulation and hoarding of wealth, and 



ignore the iiigher development, wiiich is 
claimed to be the crown of human existence. 

The theses written and committed, we 
must not treat tliem as if they, being our 
own productions, were not worthy ol' deliv- 
ery. Commencement day is too earnest a 
time for commonplaces. In tliose few 
moments before, as it were, his kniglithood 
is conferred, when the graduate stands to 
address his college mates for the last time, 
then, if it burns in him at all, flashes out 
the Promethean Are. 

It is true that we have not received all 
the literary training that we should have. 
We hope our successors will enjoy a more 
extended course. Nevertheless, we possess 
the ability, if we improve all our opportun- 
ities, to make a good showing at gradua- 
tion, and I suspect that it was more to 
guage this ability than to simply stimulate 
general literary excellence that President 
Goodell offered the prize for the best de- 
scription of the trip to West Point. Let 
us, one and all, then, take hold of all our 
coming literary work, not as an evil that 
must be endured but as something to which 
we will be indebted, for our honor and 
class pride next June. 



OUR CLOCK. 

The busy man must make his minutes 
tell, and to accomplish this in the best 
manner, he must figure closely on his time, 
but this cannot be done with certainty 
unless all have a standard time. At present 
we have no standard college time ; every 
man claims his own time-keeper to be just 
right, even when the rest differ by five 
minutes. If we regulate our time keepers 
by the bell, there is very apt to be a sudden 
loss or gain of five minutes ; again the bell 
does not always agree with the town time, 
or if they happen to agree, the drummer 
is very apt to conclude that they are both 
slow by five minutes, and so the busy man 
that looks after every minute is almost 
sure to be tardy at drill or at chapel. 
Now to obviate this difficulty, we would 
recommend a clock in the New Chapel 
tower. Why, those blank clock faces seem 
to be appealing for a clock to turn its 
hands before their faces, so they may be 
useful to the college, by showing the true 
time to all, and thus save many minutes, 
that would otherwise be wasted. Here is 
a grand chance for some class to put a use- 
ful as well as ornamental memorial on the 
college grounds ; or, perhaps some alumnus 
wishes to do it. We would recommend it 
to some of the lower classes, because if 
they do it now, they may enjoy the fruits 
of their labors. 



a8 



AGGIE LIFE. 



AGGIE LIFE. 

Miiss. Asji'lriiltiu'ill t'olli'iji'. 



Tonus $1.00 |ioi' vtiiir. In udvam'K. 



SInnIo onplos. 10c. 

Ill »'1;kim iimU iMiiHor. 



ito.titn <)»•' h'lnrous: 

W, 1'. V'K\,'\\ loaitdv ln('liU>f, 
(>. Y, II, l.At.'K. Uiislni'Ms MiUiiiniT, 
A.U.WAMKS, 'IM, M.N. l.KlJ.\'ri«, 'HI, 

a. Ij, fusuo, "la, u. u, tavi-oh, -ua, 

G.jf. oviiuaav, 'ifi. 

AiUlw\S!< nil oomiiwmlimttons to tlio Uvi.ili\n88 Miim\,s'OV. 

IjKt ovory friond of Ao«ik Lifk do all 
\w OfUi to I'xtoiul 0111' siihsuripluMi li.sl. A( 
prosi'iil., only lil'ly iiluniui U:\\o siibscriluHl. 
ir wo I'lm j^ol inoi'o suppoil, wo will ;;ivi' 
you 11 bottior psipor. U' wo li:\il :\ I'ow uioro 
subsoi'ibor.'*, wo oould si'ivo yon jmolbor 
pag'O ofiUMllor, .-is ili\ow stjuuls, il will not 
do to pro-nnnio imy iuoi'i> on I'lilrn'o sn|tm>rt. 

A'l' [irosonl .'ill sooni iibsorbod in iho oiio 
gamo ol' I'oot bull, but wo woiiKl iiiiiiiiro, 
wUoro ai'o our tonni.'* iilivyorsF (.'oc-usionjilly 
wo foo a oonpb> play iujj just to pass llio tiino 
away. Sovor:il wooks aj!,'o a tournamont 
was slarlod and pai'tly playod ; sinoo tlion 
wo havo hoard litllo ol'il. Tito b.-ui woiithor 
must Ivavo damponod tlio t^piriis of iho 
pli\yoi's vory thoroughly or olso tlio tourna- 
luont would havo boon plavod out boforo 
now. .\t prosout it looks as thiins;h tho 
playors woro (ilayovl out. Tho giuuo is a 
giHHl ttno and dosorvos moro attontiou than 
it has roooivod laloly. ospooiidly by llioso 
who do not pliiy l\)ol-ball. 

Wr would now OMution our oorrospon- 
donts in rogard lo statoniouts uuvdo in thoir 
arliolos. In tho artiolo in roijard to tho 
Urill Hall, wo publish a rol'ntalion of somo 
wronsi statonionls, niado in tho last issue, in 
rcii'ard to putting' wiro soroons over tho Orill 
Hall windows. Is it not fair, for tho oditor 
to assnuio, thsit th(» man who writos .mu 
artiolo knows wluit ho is wriliug about, i>r 
is it tho oditor's businoss to rigidly invosti- 
gato ovory statoinont publisliodr It lu.'iy 
bo tho lattor, but at prosoni wo tail to soo 
it 111 thiit light, though wo aim to roprosout 
all parlios fairly. Wo hopo. that in tho 
fviture, our correspondonis will bo smo of 
thoir stalomonts, bol'oro subniillin;>, iIumu 
for publioatiou. 



not Justioo to tho oppouont, nor does il 
holp tho man who doos it. Such twistod 
slutoinonls hiwo no wi'ight with tho hoiir- 
ors, as tho do\'ioo is too shallow to inllnonoo 
Ihinking' minds, 'ilio host way is to givo 
your oppouonl .'ill ho can justly ohiim, 
moro, r.Mlhor than loss, fiu' by so doing you 
inipross npoiiNho audionoo tho fairnoss of 
your own shitoinonts, whioh is Iho lirst 
tiling .'I good dolia.tor aims at, for if you 
oiui loud your audionoo to look at tho ipios- 
tion iin]i:\i'li:ill\ . I'l'iini yoursido, tho viottu'y 
is moro (hiin hall won, and all lluil- is 
nooossary, is, sim|ily to olinoh tho inipros 
sious ni.'ido. 



\Vk notioo, ill our various dohatos, a 
londonoy among iho spoaki^rs to twiat 
statomoiUs, mado by tho opposite sido, to 
suit llioir own oonvonionoo. Now this is 



TuK cpiostion ol'ton arisos why wo I'Miinut 
org!ini/.o !i bottor foot b.'dl and baso-bail 
toani in tho oollogo. Is it booanso wo luivo 
no uiMtoriid lo work with, or is it. tho hiok 
of intorosi, shown in llioso ganios? Truo it 
is, thill wo do nol luivo as good matorial to 
work with lis m;my ol' our hiigor oolloges, 
but is il not moro tho laok of intorost that 
makos us uusuooossrnl? Tho lattor, with- 
out doubt, is tho pi'inoipul oanso. l'\>r tho 
lirst two or tliroo days, whou tho toot-ball 
or baso-ball soasou bogiiis, tho oiimpus is 
orowdod with inon who aro sooking a posi- 
tion on tho loam. Thoy will prartioo for a 
wook and submit Ihomsolvos to tho host 
possible triuning, whou suddonly thoir 
intorost dios out, and it is almost impossiblo 
for tho captain to mako thom ooutimio. 
Thoy soom to fool sure that a man who is 
working for tho saiiio position on tho icixm 
as Ihoy aro. will uiidoubtodly bo ohoson, 
and so thoy give up all hopos of ovor 
boooining a playor. Thoy aro also atVaid 
of hurting somo (>no's fooling', by turning 
him out of his position. Now such tool- 
ings as those should boabandonoil at onoo. 
and any student who has tho fnintost idoa 
of ovor boooming oitlior a moinbor of Iho 
foot-ball or baso-ball toain should essay to 
make tho ooiiipoiition greater. Thers is 
no bottor time tor the students to manifest 
this interest than in thoir Kroshmiui year. 
.\t this stftge in their I'ourso thoy lia\o 
ample time for praotioo, and the upper 
olassnion are always ready to show llioiu 
Iho poinls of tho giiiiio. liy tho tiiiio thoy 
have boon in eoUogo a year, thoy would 
probably .get a posili>>n on tho team, thus 
I'otloeting credit not only upon ihoiusoU os. 
but upon thoir class and sooiotios. The 
result of Iho Kroshman and So[>hoiiioi'o 
gami> is a suggestive indication, how prac- 
tice makos perfect, lor both teams have 
worked hard in preparation for ihoir rooout 
game. The oollogo iipprooiatos tho intor- 



ost manifostod by tho Freshman class in 
alhlotios. Thoy have opened tho college 
yi'iir with a spirit, which is worthy of spooial 
praise and \vt> hope that it will lu' continued. 



'.rilK State is so fortunnto as to possess 
several collections which should hoof great 
bouolll. to the students, but under the pres- 
t'ul management Ihey, (with the exception 
of the Knowltoii lloi barium and Prof. Kor- 
nald's collection,) are really i)f no boiielll, to 
anyone. Onoof the most importiimt of these, 
"Tho Stat(> Colloetion of Minerals," is 
Nt.owod away in tlu< loft of tho Hrill hall. 
The minerals aro thri)wn into drawers, 
whii^h are piled, one on top of tho other, 
and are mixed with rubbish of all sorts. 
S(uue are even Ihrowu into an old pail. 
tMhors, phu'od in fragile bottles marked, 
"lliuidio with care," are thrown in with 
stones weighing several pounds. Mixed 
in with these are models ol various agricul- 
tural iiu|iloiiu'uls, nil in :i iniiious couditiou. 
On one side ol this room, ari> three largo 
cabinets llllod with insoots, which aro almost 
destroyed. .V cousiderablo niinibor of 
.la|)aiU'So implomenls. collected by I'rof. 
Ibooks while in ,lapan, are in the "0U\ l>rill 
llall." in a disorderly stale, I'ovorod with 
dust mid oobwobs. It would bo almost iai- 
possible to estimate the true value of those 
collections if properly preserved ; but of 
what use cau they be to the students and 
farmers of Mass. under the present circum- 
stances? It is doubtful, if oven a third of 
the students are aware of their existeiioe. 
What would the donors think if thej 
should discover that their colleotions wore 
in such a state ? They would at once say, 
that they should be arranged so as to be 
easily examined and referred to at any time. 
To do this it would be necessary lo erect a 
building especially arranged for this pur- 
pose, as there is no available place at present. 
This building should bo large enough to 
hold these and nil future eollections. and 
of such a design as to be an ornament to 
the college grounds. The building should 
also bo tiro-proot. in order to escape the 
fate of the old college musoiini. It is hoped 
tlinl the now Natural History Sooioty, now 
I'ormod. will hike thismntior into consider- 
ation at once, and strive to carry out the 
project to a sucessful torniinatiou. 

t^LK.VNINt^S. 

Uattalion drill now on fair ilnys. 

Siiiidl corn-cribs apponr like dots over 
Iho larni. 

riiiinksoiving vacation begins two weeks 
from to-diiY. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



29 



Ranney, '93, is uiourid withalanje knee, 
the effect of foot- ball. 

Blaiicliaid, '94, and Wliitcomb, '94, are 
about to leave college. 

Last week the celery was packed in the 
cellar, and in outside trenches. 

Is it not time to begin work on that 
pond? Begin early and have a good one. 

Nov. loth, the last game of the season, 
Aggie vs. Worcester Tech. at Worcester. 

Faculty meetings seem to be the order of 
the day. We hope to see some results next 
term. 

Staples, '9.3, who has been at home some 
time on account of sickness, returned last 
week. 

C. D. Green, '92, has left college to ac- 
cept a situation as accountant, at Three 
Kivers. 

Sullivan, '94, dislocated his arm at the 
elb./W in the Sophomore-Freshman game 
last week. 

What seems to be the trouble with the 
tennis tournament? Has it frozen up, oi' 
stopped short for repairs? 

We understand that the Botanic Depart- 
ment will shortly commence underdraining 
the Nursery and adjacent grounds. 

A large part of the pasture back of the 
Hatch Experiment barn is being under- 
drained by students, this fall. 

J. S. Loring, '90, is here to remain with 
U8 a few weeks. He is to do some survey- 
ing at the Botanical Department. 

Our musicians in North dormitory have 
showed a decided improvement in the last 
week ; if not in talent, at least in the cause 
of humanity. 

President Goodell was unable to be with 
us a few days last week, owing to the same 
face trouble with which he was afflicted a 
sliort time ago. 

The farm has recently purchased seven- 
teen cows that ai^erage ten pounds of butter 
apiece in a week. One of them has made 
fourteen pounds of butter a week. 

Nov. 3, Streeter, '94, goes home to vote, 
but finds on arriving at the polls that he is 
not registered. He returns next day, 
weary and sick at heart, full of regret for 
the little incident that caused the defeat of 
his party. 

The drum corps is made up this tei-m as 
follows: drum major, Ranney ; bass drum, 
Clark ; files, Howard, Toole, Putnam, 
Bal)bitt ; snare-diums, Fletcher (1st ser- 
geant and chief musician) West, Williams ; 
.Johnson, '94, bass drum carrier. 



Company D. oljtained the colors for this 
tei'm by lot. 

0. V. B. I>:ige will represent Aggie Lifk 
at the alumni dinner in Boston, Nov. 14th, 
1890. 

Why? is Dearest, in my sight, 
Like a Ivnob, so clean and bright. 
Echo softly whispers o'er, 
She is sonietliing to a (Jo('o)r(e). 

The evening of the Springfield game 
Lieut. Cornish did the handsome thing by 
furnishing eighteen rounds of powder, one 
lor each point made ; he even came up to 
the college himself to see that there was no 
trouble in securing it from the Armory. 
The cannon spoke well of the victory. 

The foot-ball game of Tuesday, Nov. 4, 
between '93 and '94 with a score of 12 to 12 
wasoneof the most exciting games that has 
taken place on the campus this season. '93 
had a little the heavier rush-line, but it was 
clearly seen that '94's team had the most 
practice. Behind the lines, '93's quarter- 
back and full-back did the best work, while 
the work of '94's half-backs was very com- 
mendable. It is uncertain whether the tie 
will be played off or not. 

The Natuial History Society, organized 
a week ago, held its first regular meeting 
Monday evening, with eighteen charter 
members present. The first business of 
the evening was the election of permanent 
officers, as follows: H. T. Shores, '91, 
president ; H. M. Thomson, '92, vice-pres- 
ident ; G. E. Taylor, '92, secretary and 
treasurer; directors, H. T. Shores, '91, 
chairman; F. A. Smith, '93, clerk; E. P. 
Felt, '91, W. W. Gay, '91, .J. B. Knight, 
'92, and I. C. Greene. '94. Then followed 
a general discussion of plans, and a valua- 
ble talk by Professor Fernald upon the 
possible lines of work for the members. 
The object of the society is in pan to fur- 
nish a means for enlarging the college col- 
lections, and also to promote a greater 
interest in, and a keener observation of 
natural objects, and the sciences connected 
with them. The members are starting in 
with a will, and if the interest is kept up 
its possibilities for study and advancement 
are unlimited. The programme for the 
next meeting, which is to he held Nov. 17, 
is as follows : The question to be consi- 
dered is. Why do I choose this line of 
uork? Botany? F.H. Plumb; Mineralogy? 
\V. W. Gay; Entomology? E. P. Felt; 
Oology ?H.T. Shores; Ornithology? I. C. 
Greene. The speakers are limited to ten 
minutes each. After their arguments there 
will be a general discussion upon the sub- 
jects. 



FOOT-HALL. 

Aggie, 18; Si-uingkikld Training 

School, 12. 

On Saturday, Nov. 1, our eleven visited 
Springfield and defeated Stagg's team, by a 
score of 18 to 12, in a game characterized 
by brilliant playing on both sides. Both 
teams used the V to great advantage, and 
the side that secured the ball the greater 
number of times was sure fo make the 
longest gains. For the Aggies, Hull 
played a phenomenal game, his long runs 
being somewhat marvelous, while Willard 
and Ranney played their respective posi- 
tions finely. For the Springfields, the 
playing of Stagg, Ball and Corbett was 
especially noticeable. The game was call- 
ed at three o'clock, the ball being in pos- 
session of the Springfields, who opened the 
game by a succession of Vs forcing the 
ball to the 20-yard line. Aggie then se- 
cures the ball and try a V, going completely 
through the Springfield team, and Hull 
makes a phenomenal run securing a touch- 
down, Paige kicking a goal. Score, Aggie, 
6 ; Springfield, 0. 

Both teams line up in center of field, the 
Springfields having the ball, they gain ten 
yards by means of the V. Ball and Cor- 
bitt then make good gains, followed by 
Stagg who makes a gain of five yards. 
Another V and Ball gains fifteen yards. 
Still another V and Ball makes a touch- 
down. Stagg fails at goal. Score, Aggies, 
6 ; Springfields, 4. The teams line up on 
25-yard line. Aggie again breaks through 
the line by means of V, and Hull makes 
another gain of sixty yards but being 
winded is downed by Stagg near the 20- 
yard line. Several more short rushes and 
the ball goes to the Springfields who imme- 
diately lose it on four downs. Aggie gains 
thirty yards with the V and loses the ball 
by a fumble, but recovers it in the next 
scrimmage. 

Captain Hull orders the wedge with good 
results until he is able to carry the ball over 
the line and make a touch-down, Paige 
kicking a goal. Score, Aggie, 12 ; Spring- 
field, 4. During the remaining ten minutes, 
the ball was forced alternately up and down 
the field by both teams until time was called 
by the referee. 

Second half. Aggies have the ball. 
Paige fumbles a long pass. No gain. Hull 
takes ball and makes ten yards around the 
end. Paige takes ball. No gain. Capt. 
Hull again orders the wedge and the ball is 
forced rapidly down the field, until Hull 
carries the ball over and makes the third 



30 



AGGIE LIFE. 



C. H. SANDERSON & CO, 



CASH DEALERS IN 



^■PII]B 0LOTHII]g, 

Hats, Caps, Umbrellas, and Gents' 
Furnishing Goods. 



CASH EOW, 



AMHERST. 



S/NDEi|sofi k Thompson, 



CASH DEALERS IN 



Dry and Fancy Goods, 



HOSIERY, RIBBONS, AND SMALL 
WARES OF ALL KINDS. 



AMHERST, MASS. 



BOOTS#SHOKS 

FOR EVERYBODY. 



A FINE LINE OF STODENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, 
BALS. AND CONGRESS. 

A PULL LINE OF 

IITJBBEE, C3-OOI3S, 

FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 

Repairing Done Promptly. 
T; W. SLOAN, 

» PBOSNIX MOW. 



S. J. SULLIVAN, 

DEALER IN 

Second- Hand Clothes 

AND 

FUEl^ITUEE. 

|^°Orclers promptly attended to.,,^1 
P. O. Box, 319. AMHERST, MASS. 



touch-down. Paige kicks goal. Score, 
Aguie, 18 ; Springfield, 4. 

Ball goes to centre of field. Springfield 
has the ball and by means of the V forces 
the ball down the field ten yards at a time, 
until they have secured a touch-down. No 
goal. Score, Aggie, 18 ; Springfield, 8. 
They line up on the 25-yard line, Aggie 
having the ball. Hull and Paige make 
short gains but ball is lost on four downs. 
Stagg and Ball make good gains around 
the end, and by means of the V, Seerley 
makes a touch-dovvn. No goal. Score, 
Aggies, 18: Springfields, 12. During the 
remaining time the Aggies played an up- 
hill game, keeping the Springfield team in 
close proximity to the 25-yard line, in spite 
of the powerful Vs, which confronted them. 
The teams lined up as follows : 

AGGIES. SPRINGFIELDS. 

Carpenter, left end, Garland, 

Graham, left tackle. Barton, 

Riiggles, left guard, Corbett, 

Baker, centre, Nalsmith, 

Rauney, right guard. Smith, 

H.M.Howard, right tackle, VanLeuvin, 
Rogers, right end. Black, 

Willard, qnarter-back, Keller, 

Hull, right-half, Seerley, 

Paige, left-half, ' Ball, 

Starr, full-back, Stagg. 

Howard, E. C, in place of H. M., injured. 

Referee, Mr. McKee of Springfield. 

Umpire, Mr. Magill of Amherst. 



Dear Editors : — On my visit to old 
Aggie not many days since I saw my Alma 
Muter for the first time since graduation. 
What a change has taken place since my 
day. The principal buildings of that time 
are but a small fraction of tlie College as 
it now stands. Old South College, burnt 
a few years ago, has been replaced by an 
edifice that would be a credit to any insti- 
tution. Those of you who room in the 
new building enjoy advantages of air and 
light unknown to my college life. Then, 
what an addition the new chapel is. When 
I delivered my commencement oration it 
was from the low, small stage in the Old 
Chapel. That chapel room was larger 
then than now, as part of it has been par- 
titioned off for a zoological laboratory. 
The auditorium of the new building will 
accommodate three times the number that 
the old one would, and the library on the 
lower floor of the former has for its nucleus, 
the one that used to be in the north end of 
the present Reading Room. 

Speaking of the Reading Room reminds 
me. During my visit I went into the one 
in North College and looked over the dif- 
ferent college papers, as was my wont 




Businei i'HANK WOOD will 

Spre.acls tor me lioys tnis winter. Send your 
right along to get there first. 



get up 
orders 



M. A. C. STUDENTS SHOULD GO TO 



BLOD&ETT ^ SLSJJK 

FOR THEIR 



AND 



GENTS FURNISHING GOODS. 



Laundry Agency also. 



JOHN MULLEN, 



-DEALER IN- 



MEATS and PROVISIONS, 

VEGETABLES OF ALL KINDS IN SEASON, 

FISH AND OYSTERS, FOREIGN 

AND DOMESTIC FRUITS, 

AND CANNED 

GOODS. 

Palmer's Block, Main Street. 



E. R. BENNETT, 
Jeweler, 

Optician, 

Watchmaker. 

FINE GOODS! LOW PRICES! 

GOOD WORK WARRANTED. 

First Door from Post OiBce. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



31 



when in college. Glancing over the pages 
of the Amherst Student the word "Aggies" 
caught ray eye. I read the article, which 
was one referring to the time when some 
Amherst men set fire to a barrel of tar that 
was to be used in laying a walk, and our 
fellows got the credit foi' it. I had to 
laugh as I read. Is tradition, then, so im- 
perfect in Amherst College? An iucident 
of my college days crossed ray mind. The 
Intellects, as we called the Amherst College 
students, had won a ball game but lacked 
the means wherewithal to celebrate. Be- 
sides the two twelve-p'iuuders uow on our 
campus there was then a small cannon, a 
six-pounder. After dark that night some 
fellows from the old college came up and 
took this small gun down town, as thej' 
thought unobserved, but one of our fellows 
had espied them, and procuring a rat-tail 
file and a hammer followed them until they 
stopped. While they were trying to load 
the piece, the Aggie stepped up to the 
breach, found the vent, drove in the file 
and broke it off, and then vanished in the 
darkness. The purloiners of the gun tried 
to have the file bored out, but of course 
this attempt was a flat failure. They paid 
for the cannon a good round sum, up in the 
hundreds of dollars. Aside from a few 
incidents which, like tliis generally resulted 
in their discomfiture, their relations to our 
fellows were friendly and I suppose they 
are so to-day. 

The Drill Hall is an innovation. We 
used to drill in the hall in the top of Old 
Chapel when the weather prevented drilling 
on the campus. 1 am told that this room 
is now filled with an interesting collection 
of implements and curiosities brought from 
Japan by Prof. Brooks, but I was unable 
to spare time to 'go in there. The Drill 
Hall contains all that is left of the six-oared 
shell in which our crew won the cham- 
pionship of American colleges in 1874, and 
in the Commandant's office are the old 
crew's flags, but the once bright maroon 
has faded to pink, and even the white is 
yellow with age. 

The West Point uniform worn by the 
cadets is new to me, for our uniform was a 
Panama hat and a flannel shirt with M. A. 
C. worked inside a shield on the breast, 
and worn with our ordinarj' clothes, but 
now 1 hear that the Battalion will assume 
the regular army U'liform next term. 

Wlien Time shall have plied his wasting 
hand till not one dear old face is left to 
refresh memory, and each old building that 
we knew shall have crumbled to dust and 
new ones have taken its place, to the last 



survivor of the early day the college will be 
his Mecca still, still sending out her sons 
to take their places in the ranks of man- 
kind, her colors still floating proudly where 
the strife of good and evil rages hottest, 
"till the stock of the Puritans die." 



WHEN THE CHAPEL BELL RINGS 
IN TI-IE MORNING. 

The rreshuian opens his sleepy eyes, 
And gazes about him in sad surprise, 
On the dreary eartli and tlie leaden skies. 
As from bed lie slowly prepares to rise. 
This chilly November morning. 

He dare not delay — though he sat up late 
The night before, and crammed his pate 
With all sorts of stuff, at a furious rate. 
And now he is sleepy, but must not wait. 
For at seven o'clock — as sure as fate. 
The Chapel bell rings in the morning. 

It calls alike to young and old. 
It hurries them up, both timid and bold. 
And tells them a tale that has oft been told. 
That the steak will be dry, and the coffee cold, 
If they don't fly around in the morning. 

The lucky fellow whose problems are done. 
And whose Latin was learned ere the set of the 

sun, 
Who was out last night, for a brisk little run. 
Flies cheerfully off as if shot from a gmi. 
At quarter past eight in the morning. 

But if x = breakfast and y = prayers. 
What = the Freshman, as up and down stairs, 
Plods slowly along, while his countenance wears 
A look of distress, and of manifold cares. 
At half past eight in the morning. 

For the chemistry notes which he copied last 

night. 
To the four winds of heaven have taken their 

flight, 
And to borrow, his conscience says, would not 

be right, 
Especially should he get caught, and the fright 
Of the thought makes him look in the cold gray 

light. 
Quite peaked and pale in the morning. 

Ding, dong — ding, dong — goes tile chapel bell, 
And many a tale its tongue could tell. 
But it keeps its secret remarkably well, 
.4.nd keeps the boys on time as well. 
At every hour in the morning. 

And for Sunday service it rings out clear. 
Sending its music far and near. 
Calling so loudly that all may hear. 
But not all obey its summons, I fear. 
At half after ten in the morning. 



MAILS. 
Mail leaves college for P. 0. at 1 p. m. 
and 7 p. m. on week days. On Sunday it 
leaves ^t 4-45 p. m. At the P. 0. mails 
close as follows : 

Boston, 

7-45, 8-30, 10-15 a.m. ; 4-00, 6-45, 7-45 p.m. 

New York, Western and Southern States, 

7-45, 10-15 A. M. ; 4-00, 6-45, 7-45 p. m. 

Northampton, Sioringfield and Western 

Massachusetts, 

7-20, 10-15, 10-45 A. M. ; 6-45 p. m. 

Northern way, N. L. Northern, 

8-30 A. M. 

The treasurer will be at his oflSce from 4 

to b p. M. on Saturdays throughout the 

term. 

The museum of natural history will be 
open to visitors from 3 to 4 each afternoon 
excepting Saturday and Sunday. 

The college library will be open from 2 
to 4 p. M. and from 7 to 8 p. m. each day, 
excepting Saturday and Sunday. On Sat- 
urdaj' it will be open from 9 to 12 a. m. and 
from 2 to 4 p. m., and on Sunday from 2 
to 3 p. M. 

President Goodell will be at his office 
from 2 to 4 p. m. every afternoon except 
Saturday and Sunday. 

GEO. GRAVES, 

DEALER IN 

Painters' Supplies 

Personal a'ttention given to Frescoing, Dec- 
orating and Paper Hanging, and all 
Interior and Exterior . 
House Painting. 

Pleasant SI, near L J, Spear's Siiop. 



AMHERST COLLEGE 

GO-OPERATIVE STEi LAUiRy 

and Carpet Renovavini Estaisliment. 



Aggie Agent, H. M. HOWARD, '91. 

Work taken Monday delivered Wednesday. 
" " Wednesday delivered Saturday. 

S.A.XISI^.A.CTIOrQ' C3-T:j^ft.R.*<^3SrTEBE>. 

OFFICE AT BRINE'S. 

H. A. UTLEY, Manager. 



32 



AGGIE life; 



PRAYER MEETING TOPICS. 

Nov. 13.— Humility. 1 Pet. 5 : 1—7. A. E. 

Streeter. 
Nov. 16.— Burdeu Bearing. Gal. 6 : 1-10 ; Rom. 

15 : 1-7. A. H. Sawyer. 
Nov. 20.— Eight Thinking. Phil. 4 :-l-9. H. M. 

Thomson. 
Nov. 23.— Home Missions. Matt. 22 : 1-10. H. 

T. Shores. 



ALUMNI. 

E. R. Flint, '87, recently of the State 
Experiment Station, after a pleasant voy- 
age across the Atlantic, and a week's travel 
on the Continent, arrived safely in G6tti:i- 
gen and is already at work. Mr. Flint 
was the first man to matriculate at the 
University for the Winter Semester. He 
will make chemistry his major study, with 
physiological botany and geology as mi- 
nors. 

H. E. Chapiu, '81, Importer of Sheet 
Music and Musical Instruments, 402 Main 
street, Springfield. 

J. S. West, '90, will take a post-graduate 
course in Chemistry. 



IP YOU WANT TO GET OYSTEES IN ANY 
STYLE GO TO 

E. B. ARNOLD'S 

students are attended at short notice. 



Open all days, of the week until 12 o'clock. 
Sundays from 9 a. m. to 12-30 p. M., and from 
7 p. M. to 11 p. M. 

William's Block, Merchants' Row. 



The title page of this book was drawn and engraved Ijy 



>J 



6 Davis Street, 



BOSTON, MASS. 



The various publications of Bates, Bowdoln, Colby, 
Tufts, Mass. Agricultural College, Wellesly and Yale 
have used his work. He will submit sketches and cari- 
catures for your approval. 



OFFICE OF 



EDWAED A. THOMAS, 

FiijE /lip . Life I^rance JIge^t. 

EEAL ESTATE POE SALE AND TO LET. 



Office, Coolcs JBlocJc, Amherst, Mass, 



E, B, DI0KII]SOI]. D. D, S, 



KELLOGG'S BLOCK, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Office Hours, 9 to 12 a. ji., ISO to 5 p. M. 



«S"Ether and Nitrous Oxide Gas administered when 
desired. 



.A.T the: 



_/MHERST CASH SHOE STORE, 

You can get the most for your money. 

BOOTS AND SHOES, EUBBERS, OVEE- 

SHOES, SLIPPEES, TEUNKS, 

AND BAGS. 



REPAIRING NEATLY DONE, 



HAWES & STINSON, 



CASH ROW, AMHERST, MASS. 




AMHERST HOUSE 



LIVERY, FEED, and SALE STABLE, 



T, L PAIGE, Prop'r. 



HACKS TO AND PROM ALL TEAINS, OM- 
NIBUSES, HACKS, DOUBLE AND 
SINGLE TEAMS PUENISHED 
AT SHORT NOTICE. 
CAREFUL DRIVERS. PAIR PEICES. 

amhejRst, mass. 



So JTHE SfHUDENrpS. 



A class in Dancing and the German 
is being formed, composed of Agricul- 
tural College students only. All under- 
graduates luishbig to join will please 
address Jor information 

A. X. PETIT, 

P. 0. Box 382. 



Mass. Ag[|icultui^al College, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHERST, MASS. 

We would inform the friends of the college, 
and the public generally, that we are prepared 
to supply 

PRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND 

SHRUBS, SMALL PEUITS AND 

PLANTS, 

true to name, also 

CUT FLOWEES AND DESIGNS, 

all at the lowest price. 

For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and Small 

Fruits, address, 

Prof. S. T, Maynard, 

AMHERST, MASS 



THE AMHERST 



FURNITURE/ND CARPET STORE.'^ 



A complete line of goods suited to the students' 
wants. 

BEDSTEADS, MATTEESSES, PILLOWS,] 



STUDY DESKS AND CHAIES , 
LOUNGES, 

WINDOW SHADES, DRAPERIES, 

CARPETS, RUGS, ETC., ETC., 



All t/oods Strictly Cash and at Zowest JPrices. 



E. D. MARSH, 



10 PHCENIX ROW, 



AMHERST, MASSJ 



Sheet Music, 



Muf^ic Books, 



Strings 

FOR THE VIOLIN, BANJO, GUITAR, 



Cushman's Music Store, 



A.IVIISBS.ST- 



J. M,. WAITE k SON, 



AND DEALERS IN 



Hats, Caps, Furs, Trunks, Bags, Furnisliiog Goods. 

Latest Styles iu Furnishings. Agent for 

Knox's and Youman's Hats. Sole 

Agent for Pittsfleld 

Laundry. 

Hats Repaired. Furs Renovated 

Give us a call before, purchasing. 
NO, 5 BMfENIX ROW, A^MHEJU^T, MASS, 



%m\itx%i %QViu, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



The undersigned is pleased to announce 
to his former patrons and others desiring 
Game Spreads or Dinners, that he is always 
prepared to accomodate (at short notice; 
large or small parties. 

Ample dining room capacity for 200 peo- 
ple. 

LORENZO CHASE, Prop'R. 



...g^DENTISl^S.^g., 



C. S. GATES, D. D. S. 



T. G. HUNTIN^GTO:?^, D.D. S. 



CUTLEJt'S SLOCK, A^MHERST, MASS. 



OFFICE HOURS: 
9 A.. Ti/L. TO B F. H/L. 

Ether and Nitrous Oxide administered wlien 
desired. 



I7OWES ^ I^EhLOGG, 



DEALEKS IN 



^■gTUDEI]T'g SUPPLIES 



■^€r 



FANCY GROCERIES, CROCKERY, CIGARS, 

CIGARETTES, TOBACCO, FRUITS 

AND CONFECTIONERY, 

LftlQP (SOODg S;I]D KE]^OgEI]B OIL, 

aVoors South of v. O., - AMBERST, MASS. 



EDWIN NELSON, 

Books and Stationery, 

Next door to Post Office, 
AMHERST, MASS. 



\VOOD'S HOUSE 

HMP( DKESSII]g l^OOIIiS, 

Razors Honed and Shears Sharpened at 
short notice. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



C. R. KENFIELD, 



-^JEWELEK,^ 



Wontl's Jilocli, 



Amherst, Mass. 



SPECIAL. 



A Stem Wind and Set Wnltlinni, HiiiniMlen, Elgiii or II 
linois niovcinciit in a fiold Filled Case for $15.00. 



Umbrellas covered while you wait, also .dealer 
in Guns, Rifles, Ammunition and Sporting Goods 
of all kinds. Amateur Photogr.aphic Outfits and 
Supplies. Views and Pictures taken when de- 
sired. Views of Amherst and Vicinity for sale. 
Call and see before purchasing elsewhere. 

«SrWATCH AND CLOCK REPAIRING A SPECIALTY. JSr 



J. L. LOV^ELL, 

DRY PLATES, COMPOUND DEVELOPER 

AND SENSITIZED PAPER, READY 

FOR USE. 



PRINTING FOR AMATEURS 

Done in the best manner. 



AMHERST, MASS. 



a 0. PE 



H 



Maiit Talioi, 



.A. JS/^mERS T, 



1VC..A.S3S. 



el. fl. I^AWSON, 



DEALER IN 



WftTKHES, SLOSKg, JEWELRY, 

FINE POCKET CUTLERY, SILVER AND 

PLATED WARE, OPTICAL GOODS, 

CANES, SPORTING AND 

FANCY GOODS, 

Gold Pens, Fine Stationery. 



REPARING NEATLY and PROMPTLY DONE. 



AMHERST, MASS. 



DWIGHI^ CQOOI^B, 



BILLIARD AND POOL 



F.A.R.J-.OR., 



3 l*h(('nijc Rolf ( Up-sta h'S ) , 

AMHERST, MASS, 



Massachusetts Agricultural College, 






"'^: 




iVirxlxoi^^^t, JM^o^?»«»« 






VOL. I. 



AMHERST, MASS., NOVEMBER 26, 1890. 



NO. 5. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



VOL. I. 



AMHERST, MASS., NOVEMBER 26, 1890. 



No. 5 



WHERE DO YOU BUY m\ 

Meei'schavira Pipes? 
French Briar Pipes? 
Choice Tobacco? 
Sponges? 
Soap? 

Hair Brushes from 25 cts. up? 
Combs from 5 cts. up? 
Choice New York Confectionery? 
Sliaving Mugs? 
Sliaving Soap? 
Lather Brushes? 

Cigarettes, fresh every two weeks? 
Tlie Best Soda in America? 
Tlie Best Bay Rum? 
Imported Perfumes? 
Prescriptions prepared by licensed pharmacists? 
Imported Domestic Tooth Brushes? 

If you have not obtained these necessaries at 
DEUEL'S DRUG STORE, you laave begun 
wrong. Deuel's is the leading Drug Store in 
Westeru Mass., and keeps the largest assort- 
ment of goods at bottom prices. 



D 



D1& STOR 

Amtierst House Block, Amiierst, Wlass, 



HENRY ADAMS, 

PHARMACIST, 

KO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, - - AMHERST, MASS. 

Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORT- 
ED AND DOMESTIC CIGARS, 
CIGARETTES, ETC., 
MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, 
PISHING TACKLE AND SPORTING GOODS, 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, and Sporting 
and Springfield Rifles. 

Sunday and night calls responded to at resi- 
dence, first door west of Wood's Hotel. 



(brugs, Medicines, 

TOILET ARTICLES, 

CONFECTIONERY, CIGARS, CIGARETTES. 

AND SMOKERS' GOODS. 



rJlYSICTANH' PRBSCRIFTIONS CAItE- 
JFUZiyr COMFOTTNDED, 



% PHfil^njMY, 



6::PH(ENIX ROW. 

Order your COAl here. 



A TRIP TO WEST POINT. 

It having been the custom of each Senior 
class in cohne(:tion with, and for the further- 
ance of its military instruction, to take a 
trip to Springfield, or some neighboring 
city, the class of '91 decided to make a 
tour to West Point, it being not only a 
place of such historic importance, and the 
seat of the United States Military Acad- 
emy, but also the graduating place of our 
Commandment of Cadets. 

Leaving Amherst at 5-19 p. m., Oct. 1, 
a happy party of eighteen, we reached New 
Haven at a Utile past eight o'clock. But 
little could be seen of the intervening coun- 
try as everything was wrapt in darkuess, 
and hushed in silence, broken only by the 
rush and clang of the train. 

After spending the evening in various 
ways about the city, all repaired to the C. 
H. Northam, then in the harbor. It was 
a mild, serene, autumn night; the sky was 
nearly cloudless and tlie winds were silent. 
The moon, then past her full, arose in all 
her beauty, and with the aid of the stars, 
presented a magnificent spectacle. 

At one o'clock the boat started for New 
York. After watching the beautiful scen- 
ery for some time, one after another retired 
to his berth. All arose early in the mjrn- 
ing to observe the beautiful scenery, in the 
vicinity of New York Harbor. The elec- 
tric lights made a beautiful appearance. , 

Arriving at New York about six o'clock, 
we immediatelj' got breakfast, and, after 
spending the intervening time looking about 
the city, we went aboard the elegant steam- 
er New York for the trip up the Hudson. 

Words do not exist that can do justice 
in describing the scenery along the Hudson 
River. There is great variety in the land- 
scape. After leaving New York, we see 
for some distance the gradual sloping sides 
of the hills on both banks, here and there 
a town, and various other points of inter- 
est, one of which is the residence of Jay 
Gould, situated on the east bank and 
plainly visible from the boat. 

After having travelled about forty-five 
miles, we passed between a series of hills, 
whose frequently precipitous sides rise often 
abruptly from the water's edge to moder- 
ate heights,- and have to a lover of nature 
an impressiveness and grandeur rarely 



equalled. After passing through a few 
miles of this attractive scenery, we arrived 
at VV'est Point, but how surprised to find 
not the fortified place surrounded by breast- 
works that we had imagined, but as it 
appeared from the boat, simply a few 
buildings situated on a hill some distance 
above the water's edge. 

Leaving the boat a little before noon, we 
walked up the hill and soon reached the 
oflSce of the Colonel, who very courteously 
afforded us every facility to investigate and 
study the system of discipline and adminis- 
tration of the corps of cadets. We found 
West Point situated in a bend of the Hud- 
son. The river approaching it from the 
north suddenly turns to the southeast for 
about one-fourth of a mile, and as suddenly 
resumes its southerly course leaving West 
Point in the southern angle of the bend. 

This government tract comprises about 
twenty-one hundred acres, and was pur- 
chased in 1790 from a son of one of the 
patentees. During the War of the Ameri- 
can Independence, obstructions were built 
across the river at this point, to prevent its 
navigation by the British. 

The northern side of the town is curved 
so as to form a small gulf on the north- 
western side. The gently sloping sides 
command a fine view up the river. The 
eastern side is straight, and has for some 
distance a natural mound, facing the river, 
of a few feet in height which is backed up 
by a steep mountain wall. 

The Military Academy is situated on a 
tableland about one-hundred and sixty feet 
above the river, and is bordered on the 
west by rocky heights, upon the nearest 
and most important of which are the ruins 
of Fort Putnam, of such historical interest, 
built during the Revolutionary War. On 
the south, the precipitous sides approach 
the river leaving only room enough for a 
few houses and a road leading southward. 

The principal buildings of the Academy 
are situated on the southern end of the 
tableland, and consist of two dormitories, a 
gymnasium, commissarj' department, chap- 
el, library, mess-hall and some others. Im- 
mediately around the dormitories, it is 
somewhat barren, but to the northeast of 
of them is a broad expanse of level land 
which, being well grassed over, except on 
the parade ground, affords an excellent 



34 



AGGIE LIFE. 



place for sports and recreation. In the 
north-western side of the town is a little 
village containing the necessary barracks 
and store-houses for the United States 
troops stationed there to command the 
river. The ofHcers' quarters are mostly 
situated upon the road leading southward 
from the dormitories. 

Turning now to the cadets themselves, 
we found them an erect, healthy and well 
disciplined set of young men, who seemed 
to appreciate the true object of the military 
department. The close-fitting, shapely 
military clothes, which they wore continu- 
ally, seemed to have assisted in habituating 
the cadets to that erect, healthy position of 
a soldier so manifested by them. 

Correctness of discipline and deportment 
is required of ail, and special attention is 
paid to rules of military etiquette. All 
officers may, and the " officer of the day " 
is bound by his honor to report all viola- 
tions of the rules in vogue. When the 
battalion is formed to march to supper, 
all the violations occurring that day are 
published together with the name of each 
transgressor. Each cadet may have one- 
hundred and [fifty such demerits in six 
months before dismissal from the academy. 
If the offence be deemed worthy, he is put 
into the "light prison," which means prac- 
tically debarring him from all society, 
save at recitation and meal times, for a 
certain number of days as the case de- 
mands. 

Passing into the cadet's rooms, we notice 
the systematic arrangment of all clothing, 
bedding, furniture, and the like. " A place 
for everything, and everything in its place" 
was the rule The floors are without car- 
pets, and the chairs simple wooden ones. 

The cadets " fall in" at the bugle call, 
to march to and from meals as well as 
recitations. No one is allowed to rise or 
sit in his chair at the table except by com- 
mand. Their food, cooked at the mess- 
hall, is wholesome in quality, and sufficient 
in quantity. 

Again, we noticed in a marked degree 
the recognition of seniority, as well as the 
dignity of the officers in charge. Every 
cadet was very careful to salute all officers 
that he met. Another commendable thing 
was what is rarely met with in other insti- 
tutions, namely, the spirit of deraociacy, 
which is very noticeable. No hereditary 
differences of I'ank or privilege are recog- 
nized either by the cadets or professors. 
Each man is rated for what he is really 
worth. 

It is a somewhat prevalent idea that the 



education at West Point is wholly of a 
military character, but this is not so. The 
United States Government, believing that 
the best preparation for professional ser- 
vice of any kind, either in peace or vpar, is 
acquired by a thorough culture in all manly 
qualities, gained only by a general system 
of education, and an interpretation of the 
best principles, has maintained the acad- 
emy upon that basis. 

Yet their military education is not defi- 
cient either in theory or practice. Besides 
the various drills such as infantry, heavy 
and light artillery, and cavalry, they are 
trained in constructing bridges and field 
fortifications, and in fact, in everything 
that would enter into active military duty. 
During a part of the summer, the cadets 
are encamped in tents upon the post, and 
made subject to the police and discipline 
of an army in time of war. 

Not the least noticeable among the many 
attractions were the many relics of past 
wars, especially of the Revolutionary and 
Mexican Wars. In the museum were all 
sorts of ancient and modern appliances, 
such as guns, swords, projectiles of all 
kinds, and many others. There were guns 
of various shapes and sizes scattered over 
the entire post, each having its own re- 
markable history. Another attraction was 
the chain that was stretched across the 
river to prevent the passage of British 
ships. There are upon the post several 
monuments erected to the memory of vari- 
ous military heroes. 

At four o'clock in the afternoon of the 
day we arrived, the cadets were fallen in 
for their regular drill. Divisions of the 
battalion were drilled at standing gun, sea- 
coast, siege gun and mortar drill. With- 
out going into detail, it should be said 
that in all the drills, the cadets showed 
that uniformity of action, promptness and 
precision of execution only acquired by 
young men having active minds, an unflag- 
ging interest, and hard, constant practice. 
Their marching was excellent, and their 
respect for authority manifest. 

The drill being over, we walked to High- 
land Falls, a town situated about a mile 
and a half south of West Point, where we 
were hospitably entertained for the night. 

Waking up the next morning, we found 
it raining quite hard, but after having 
breakfast, we courageously returned to 
West Point, and after reviewing again the 
various points of interest we passed to 
the "riding hall," where the cavalry drill 
was to be held owing to the inclemency of 
the weather. The horses having been 



brought in, the Senior class entered, and, 
having mounted, marched for some time. 
They then evinced their skill by the vari- 
ous feats which they performed with their 
sabres while their horses were running and 
vaulting horrizontal bars at regular inter- 
vals, all corresponding to the various 
"points" and "cuts," involved in actual 
cavalry fighting. ■ After removing their 
sabres, the flexibility of their bodies was 
shown in their ability to mount and dis- 
mount their horses while running. While 
there, we had occasion to notice that pluck 
and persistency said to characterize West 
Point cadets. 

To the casual observer. West Point ap- 
pears to be a strongly fortified place, and 
as a natural fortification this is true, since 
it is bounded on both the east and west by 
high mountain walls, and is practically in- 
accessible, save by water. Yet the guns 
in use there, are said to be entirely incom- 
petent to resist attacks from the modern 
improved ships. 

Upon the northern side of the post is to 
seen a sea-coast battery having guns of 
various sizes, the largest of which has a 
fifteen inch bore. Situated a little to the 
south-west of the seacoast is a seige gun 
battery and several mortars, all of which 
point up the river. Situated upon the 
south-eastern point of the post is another 
seacoast battery having guns pointing in 
both directions of the river. 

Having seen the position of West Point, 
situated as it is upon the bank of one of 
the most beautiful rivers in the world, and 
comparatively isolated from the surround- 
ing country, a place associated with some 
of the most exciting events of our national 
history, and sacred to the memory of so 
many Revolutionary heroes, how eminently 
fitting that such a place should be chosen 
for a Military Academy to educate the 
American sons. 

After having been there about one day, 
and obtaining what insight we could of the 
system of administration, although the 
discipline seemed to us rather severe, we 
did not at all wonder that the graduates of 
the West Point MilitHi-y Academy take 
such high rank in after life. 

Leaving West Point about two o'clock, 
we steamed to New York in about three 
and one half hours. Spending the night 
and next forenoon in the city, we took the 
train home at two and reached Amherst 
about eight, thus returning safely from a 
trip that was pleasant and profitable, and 
long to be remembered. 

H. J. Field. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



35 



CJ . 





COLLEGE TAILOR, 



Successor to F. H. Budii & Co., Amherst Tailors 



Fall and Wilier Siitii, 



II 



ORDERS TAKEN FOR SUITS AND 

OVERCOATS, FULL DRESS 

SUITS TO ORDER. 



GENTS' FURNISHING DEPARTMENT, 
COLLARS, GUFFS and TIES, 
SUSPENDERS >ND UNDERWEAR, 

Foot-Ball and Gpiiasiyoi Goods. 



eJ. B. BRIIN^E 



Merchants' Row, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



A THANKSGIVING DAY. 

Last Thanksgiving day I was seventy- 
five miles away from home, at a certain 
eastern college. 

It happened this way, as we i;ad only a 
few days vacation at this time, six of us 
decided to remain at college and work dur- 
ing the vacation. The weather was all 
that could be desired, cool, clear, and 
frosty. 

When Thanksgiving day came we resolv- 
ed to celebrate. Procuring some old rifles, 
in place of shot-guns, and old shells loaded 
with bullets for ammunition, we started 
early in the morning after wild ducks, 
which were said to be plenty. 

The country around the college is rather 
flat and marshy with little hills on the east. 
It is rather thinly settled by farmers. After 
,a brisk half-hour's walk across fields and 
meadows we came to an isolated barn near 
the woods. As no owner was in sight we 
investigated and found a cross old cow 
with a calf in the barnyard, which was sur- 
rounded by a high fence. After a hurried 
consultation we decided that milk was what 
we wanted, especially, after I offered to 
milk the cow, if the other fellows would 
hold her and the calf. 

We laid our guns aside and prepared for 
action. I found an old tub and a milk 
pail, while the other fellows, after repeated 
trials, succeeded in throwing an old rope 
over the cow's horns and hitching her to a 
post. While one held the calf near me I 
sat down on the old tub to milk, and the 
others gathered around to watch the 
operation. 

All went well till the pail was nearly half 
full, then the cow kicked, the bottom of 
the tub fell in, and the rope broke. We 
all came in for a shower bath of milk, and 
the cow energetically assisted the other 
fellows out of the yard, at the same time 
rolling the tub and myself into a mud- 
puddle. I soon freed myself from the old 
tub and started for the fence with the cow 
after me. I was never a good athlete, but 
I cleared that fence and several rods of 
adjoining territory at a single bound. I 
acknowledge that I received material 
assistance from that cow, thoMgh I forgot 
to thank her at the time. 

After resting awhile, we brushed off the 
milk and dirt adhering to our garments, 
took our guns, and started after ducks. 

After several hours' tramping, we sighted 
a duck, and after disabling it with several 
shots at close range, succeeded in killing 
it, by wringing its neck. Strange to say, 
then only did we discover that it was a 



domesticated fowl. 

We visited several houses after milk or 
water, and tried to give that duck away or 
else abandon it. All to no purpose ; no 
one wanted it and if we tried to leave it, 
we were reminded of our game. 

Finally we threw the duck into a swamp 
and started for dinner. Strange to say, we 
enjoyed that dinner very well, though we 
suffered later. Next day a lawyer notified 
us to settle at once for milk and a duck. 
We settled by paying ten dollars for our 
fun. 



A SENIOR LAMENTATION. 

" A little knowledge is a dangerous thing, 
Drink deep or taste not tlie Pierian spring." 

So said the poet in a thoughtful mood, 
And all mankind hath said his words were 
good. 

So when we came to college, 

About three years ago ; 
It was with the intention, 

All hidden things to know. 

We climbed the hills of knowledge 

With steady steps and true ; 
And with each fast succeeding term, 
Nearer the goal we drew. 

As green and verdant Freshmen, 

Geometry we downed ; 
As gay and reckless Sophomores, 

At Chemistry we ground. 

In Junior year with Physics 

We had a toughish fight ; 
At English Lit. and Rhetoric, 

We worked with all our might. 

So we vanquished every study, 

And thought our trials done, 
When we came back as Seniors, 

But, alas, they'd just begun. 

For we met a fiery dragon 

Breathing blood and slaughter round ; 
Psychology they called him, 

And his "like we ne'er had found. 

So with him we joined in battle. 

We who never knew defeat ; 
But we've found him very mighty, 

And we almost gave up beat. 

For the content and the precept 

Sadly muddle each poor head ; 
While our blunted sense-perceptions. 

No new light upon them shed. 

Thus we struggle with thought-knowledge, 

And many flunks we make ; 
Though sometimes a brilliant " tenstrike," 

Will the dismal record break. 

Whether we will pass our " exams.," 

It would need a seer to say ; 
Though we think if cribs are plenty. 

It is possible we may. 

Now as we draw the curtain 

Over this our tale of woe ; 
To our friends the under classmen. 

We would speak before we go. 

" Do not let pride rise within you; 

Do not think you know it all ; 
For when you meetjPsychology, 

Pride will surely have a fall." 



36 



AGGIE LIFE. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Published Fortnightly by the Students of the 
Mass. Agricultural College. 



Terms $1,00 per year, in advance. 



Single copies, 10c. 



Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 



BOAJtD OJF JEXHTOnS : 

E. P. FELT, Editor-in.Chiet', 
O. V. B. LAGE, Business Manager, 
A. G. EAMES, '91, H. N. LEGATE, '91, 

J. L. FIELD, 'as, G. E. TAYLOR, '93, 

G. F. CUELEY, '93. 



Address all communications to the Business Manag^er. 



Sliall we have musical instruction tliis 
wintei ? This question lias been put to the 
students, indirectl.y at least, and it is for 
them to answer, as there is little docibt but 
that we can have such instruction if we will 
agree to support it by our presence. 

Two years ago most of the college were 
deeply interested in music, last year a good 
number started in, but toward the last of 
the course the attendance was rather slim. 
No one will deny the value of such instruc- 
tion, even though a man does not become 
a singer, the practice of singing developes 
the vocal powers, and gives a man better 
control of his voice. 

We have considerable musical talent in 
college that needs developing, and we hope, 
that next winter term a large number will 
start and continue through the course. 



Within the last few years, as the various 
classes have passed through Mechanics and 
Physics, they have been told of various 
machines, illustrating the laws under con- 
sideration, that were in the adjoining room ; 
but at that time they were out of repair, or 
else, a few experiments were tried with 
varying success. 

While we don't intend to criticise unjust- 
ly, still we must express the opinion, that 
these machines should be put in good order 
at once. They are really good machines, 
and it would not cost very much to put 
them in working order. 

The trouble with many of them, is not 
the result of abuse, but is caused simply 
by the drying and cracking influence of the 
atmosphere. For example, the packing 
around the joints has become loose, a screw 
is lost in this machine and another needs a 
little putty. The college should use all it 
has to the best advantage, before it can 
expect more. 



PRAYER BIEETING TOPICS. 

Dec. 4. Thanksgiving, Ps., 107: 1-22: 
Eph. 5 : 20. H. M. Thomson. 



Dec. 7. Home Missions, Matt. 22 : 1-10. 
H. T. Shores. 



G-LEANINGS. 

New locks have been put in the reading- 
room. 

The dam completed, now a pond glad- 
dens our eyes. 

Drill has been changed from 4 to 5 p. m., 
to 3 : 30 to 4 : 30 p. m. 

A. M. Belden, formerly of '91, made us 
a brief visit last week. 

A picture of the Freshman foot-ball team 
was taken last Thursday. 

Only three weeks before examinations. 
Are you ready for them? 

Nov. 15th, Major Ruggles inspected quar- 
ters in place of Lieut. Cornish. 

Nov. 19, the Sophomores have some 
practical instruction in drainage. 

Boardman, '94, sprained his ankle in the 
game with the High School eleven. 

Nov. 19, the Boarding club met and 
elected several men to membership. 

Sullivan's arm, which was dislocated sev- 
eral weeks ago, is improving very fast. 

A number of our men witnessed the Am- 
herst-Dartmouth game last Wednesday. 

Two student lamps have caught fire and 
been thrown out of the window within two 
weeks. 

Last Sunday the boarders at Mrs. Gil- 
bert's and Mrs. Kellogg's enjoyed three 
meals. 

We would notify all future subscribers 
that our supply of Nos. I and II is ex- 
hausted. 

Nov. 12 and Nov. 19, drill postponed 
until the following Friday, on account of 
foot-ball. 

J. H. Kellogg, '93, has cut short his 
course here and returned to his home at 
Hartford, Conn. 

Nov. 14th, Prof. Fernald, Prof. Brooks 
and Lieut. Cornish attended the alumni 
dinner at Boston. 

Now is the time to begin training in the 
gymnasium for the field day to he held 
early in the spring. 

By special request the missionary meet- 
ing, which was to be held last Sunday, was 
put over two weeks. 

Loring, Herrero, and Castro, all '90 men, 
are engaged in making a topographical sur- 
vey of the Botanic grounds. 

Is there a patent on that curious combi- 
nation of a bicycle and baby carriage, which 
we see sailing around here lately? 



Thompson, '94, has found it necessary 
to leave college, being afflicted with ill 
health. He resides here in Amherst. 

The game to have been played with Wor- 
cester Tech. the 15th was cancelled, owing 
to the disbanding of the Worcester team. 

The new uniforms were inspected last 
Monday. Evidently they have become 
mixed up as some of the Jits are remarkable. 

Nov. 19, President Goodell's twenty- 
dollar prize for the best essay on the trip 
to West Point, was awarded to H. J. 
Field. 

Nov. 22 a number of Aggies witnessed 
the two games at Springfield. Scores, 
Harvard, 12 ; Yale, 6. Stagg's team, 26 ; 
Amherst, 0. 

Clark, '92, and Hawkes, '93, are the Y. 
M. C. A. delegates to the College Students 
Bible Institute, to be held at Amherst Col- 
lege Nov. 28, 29, and 30th. 

Thomson, '92, who was badl}' poisoned 
by dogwood recently, is able to be with us 
once more. We all agree that an abun- 
dance of fat is unbecoming to his features. 

Mr. William H. Bowker, '71, and Dr. 
John Cutter, '72, have offered a prize of 
Fifteen Dollars to the man in the senior 
class, who writes the best military essay for 
commencement. 

The following officers were elected by the 
Base-ball directors for the ensuing year : 
Capt., W. C. Paige, '91 ; business mana- 
ger, G. B. Willard, '92 ; and C. H. Bar- 
ton, '94, Freshman director in place of 
Drowne, '94, who left college. 

Nov. 20, '93 elected its Index Board. 
The editors are as follows : A. E. Melendy 
editor-in-chief ; F. H. Henderson, business 
manager; F. S. Hoyt, artist; F. A. Smith, 
C. A. Goodrich, H. C. Davis, F.T. Harlow, 
associate editors. G. F. Curley was elect- 
ed but resigned. 

Nov. 21, W. I. L. S. discussed the ques- 
tion. Resolved that the McKinley bill is a 
benefit to the farmer. 1st aff. Felt, '91 ; 
1st neg. Carpenter, '91. 2nd afif. Emer- 
son, '92 ; 2nd neg. Park, '94. Weight of 
argument and the merits of the question 
were in the affirmative. 

Dr. C. A. Goessmann has been elected a 
member of the American Academy of Po- 
litical and Social Science, which numbers 
among its membership some of the most 
distinguished scientists in America. This 
was simply the recognition of true merit, 
and was unknown to Dr. Goessmann. The 
College is certainly very fortunate in pos- 
sessing such an able instructor. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



37 



Nov. 17th, the Natural History Society 
of M. A. C. held its second meeting. The 
question discussed was, Why do I take up 
this branch of Natural History. Gay, '91, 
spoke on Geology and Mineralogy several 
minutes. Felt, '91 , on Entomology ; Shores, 
'91, on Oology; I. C. Green, '94, on Or- 
nithology ; Knight, '92, spoke of Astronomy, 
Chemistry, and the vertebrates as inviting 
fields of research. After some debate on 
the questions by the house the meeting ad- 
journed. 

The Trustees at a recent meeting voted 
to accept the National Grant, and passed 
a formal order upon the State Treasurer 
for the money now in his hands. They 
also voted to appropriate $6,000 of the 
amount for the purchase of apparatus and 
books for the purpose of instruction in the 
College, to be expended under the direction 
of the Faculty. They also voted that 
Pji'es't H. H. Goodell, having been elected 
President of the Association of Presidents 
of Agricultural Colleges and Experiment 
Station Directors, be granted such leave of 
absence, as may be made necessary in the 
discharge of his new duties during the year. 



ALUMNI MEETING AND BANQUET. 

A meeting of the Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College Alumni Club of Massachu- 
setts was held at the American House, 
Boston, Nov. 14th at 6.15 p. m. Dr. Aus- 
tin Peters '81 called the meeting to order. 
In the absence of the secretary. Dr. M. 
Bunker '75, Mr. F. H. Fowler '87 was 
appointed secretary pro tem. 

After remarks by Dr. Peters, Mr. W. 
C. Parker "80 moved that the old associa- 
tion be merged into the new. This motion 
was seconded and carried unanimously. 
President Parker then took the chair and 
after stating the circumstances leading to 
the incorporation of the former organiza- 
tion under the name of the M. A. C. A. C. 
M. called upon Mr. Fowler, clerk of the 
corporation, to read the records of the 
meeting for incorporation held Oct. 28, 
1890, which he did and those records were 
approved. 

The officers appointed for the coming 
year are : W. C-. Parker '80, president ; C. 
L. Flint '81, treasurer; F. H. Fowler '87, 
clerk ; Dr. Austin Peters'81, W. H. Bowker 
'71, F. G. May '82, directors. Office of 
the clerk of the corporation. Commonwealth 
Building, Boston, Mass. 

The ascociation was chartered for the 
purpose "of advancing Scientific Agricul- 
tural Education, promoting the interests of 
the Massachusetts Agricultural College 



and perpetuating the good fellowship 
among the alumni and former students of 
said institution." The names of charter 
members are : W. C. Parker '80, C. L. 
Flint '81, F. H. Fowler '87, Dr. Austin 
Peters '81, F. G. May '82, W. H. Bowker 
'71, Charles W. McConnel '76, W. A. 
Macleod '76, H. S. Carruth '72 and J. P. 
Wagman. 

At 7-30 the club adjourned to the dining 
hall where about sixty-five alumni were 
present. The Faculty was represented b}' 
Professors C. H. Fernald, W. P. Rrooks 
and Lieut. L. W. Cornish. Aggie Life 
was represented by O. V. B. Lage '9 1. 
Mr. W. H. Bowker '71 presided. At 8-30 
the president called ihe biinqueters to or- 
der and showed in a few words the im- 
provements that the college has made this 
year and expressed his hope that soon a 
few more changes would be made. Prof. 
C. H. Fernald said that now we have come 
to a position where we can do something. 
Two new professors have been added. Dr. 
J. B.Paige'82, professor of Veterinary and 
G. F. Mills, professor of English. 

He also spoke of the advantage of lab- 
oratories in the Zoological and Botanical 
departments, which have been completed. 
About the course of study, he thinks that 
it is better to keep the present course kav- 
ing a post-graduate course added to the 
college. Mr. A. W. Dickinson '74 spoke 
of the alumni of New York and hopes that 
the college in a few years will be able to do 
good work in athletics. Lieut. L. W. 
Cornish spoke of the improvements in his 
department, and thought that the college 
should have a prize for the best military 
essay. Prof. AV. P. Brooks '75 showed 
the improvements made in the agricultural 
department and thought that electives were 
advisable and also a post-graduate course. 
Mr. VVhitaker, editor of the Netv England 
Farmer spoke on the advantage of an 
agricultural paper on agriculture. Dr. J. 
C. Cutter '73 spoke upon Japanese devel- 
opment. Mr. W. C. Parker '80 thanked 
the persons present for the honor conferred 
upon him and said that he received over 90 
favorable replies, thus showing the interest 
of the alumni of M. A. C. in the meeting. 

Mr. W. H. Bowker read letters from 
President H. H. Goodell, Prof. Levi Stock- 
bridge, C. Wellington '73, C. D. Warner 
'81, C. A. Goessmann, C. S. Walker and 
G. F. Mills thanking for the invitation and 
declining on account of previous engage- 
ments. Then followed speeches by F. 
Obes Nsjoke, C. E. Beach '82, J. M. 
Smith '74, R. W. Lyman '71, Dr. M. 



Bunker '75 and 0. V. B. Lage. The latter 
spoke on the advantage of a college paper, 
and thanked the club for the invitation in 
name of the editors of Aggie Life. 

The gathering of the 14th was a success. 
We hope that the alumni of M. A. C. will 
keep up the interest that they always have 
for their Alma Mater. 



The W. I. L. S. met Nov. 14, to discuss 
the question, Resolved, that water has 
done more damage than fire. 

The debate was opened in the affirmative 
by Mr. Shores, who said that this is an age 
of statistics, but the figures are so large 
that at a time and place like this we cannot 
comprehend them. He cited the damage 
done in Mass. by river freshets and cloud- 
bursts during the past few years, in de- 
stroying bridges and highways. Snow was 
considered as a form of water which often 
crushes roofs and bridges by its weight. 
Large losses of life and property have been 
caused in Holland by inundation at differ- 
ent times. The speaker thought that more 
persons were drowned annually than lost 
their lives by fire ; and that the greatest 
damage water has ever done was caused by 
"the flood" in the time of Noah. 

Mr. Hawkes, the first speaker in the 
negative, gave figures to show the amount 
of damage done in some of America's 
greatest fires. He spoke of the general 
damage of prairie and forest fires in the 
West ; also of the relative damage from 
fire and smash-up in railroad accidents. 

Mr. E. J. Walker, the next speaker, 
thought the loss of life by fire and water 
about equal. One great damage of water 
is in causing spread of disease in the pota- 
to and other field crops. Excessive rains 
leach the soil. The cause of the majority 
of disastrous railroad accidents he attri- 
buted to washouts. In cases of fire in 
warehouses and stores the damage by 
water is often greater than by fire. 

Mr. C. L. Brown closed the debate in 
the negative using as an argument the 
greater demand of public opinion for fire 
insurance companies, than for water or 
marine insurance companies. Then we are 
safer from damage by water than by fire ; 
for we can locate away from rivers liable 
to freshet, while fire we must have right in 
our houses. A single spark may promote 
a great explosion, but a drop of water can 
do but little harm. 

The question was then thrown open to 
the house and many present took part. 

The weight of argument and merits of 
the question were decided in the negative. 
One good feature of the meeting was that 
the floor was not without a speaker long at 
a time, and each one had something to say. 
All interested in literary work are invited 
to be present at our meetings. 



38 



AGGIE LIFE. 



C. H. SANDERSON k CO,, 



CASH DEALERS IN 



^■PII]E 0LOTHII]&, 

Hats, Caps, Umbrellas, and Gents' 
Furnishing Goods. 



CASH EOW, 



AMHERST. 



S/NDEi|so^ k Thompson, 



CASH DEALERS IN 



Dry and Fancy Goods, 



HOSIERY, RIBBONS, AND SMALL 
WARES OF ALL KINDS. 



AMHERST, MASS. 



BOOTS^SHOES 

FOR EVERYBODY. 



A FINE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, 
BALS. AND CONGRESS, 

A FDI.L LINE OF 

ItXJBBEB, C3-OOIDS, 

FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 

Repairing Done Promptly. 
T, W. SLOAN, 

2 PM<ENIX MOW. 



S. J, SULLIVAN, 

DEALER IN 

Second-HandlClothes 



FURI^ITURE. 



"Orders promptly attended to. 
P. 0. Bos, 319. AMHERST, MASS. 



Chicago, III., Nov. 14, 1890. 

The alumni and former students of the 
Mass. Agricultural College assembled here 
to form a " Western Association," gladly 
avail themselves of the presence of Pies. 
Goodell to send through him a hearty 
greeting to the students now in attendance. 

We are glad to learn of the prosperous 
condition of the college, and proud as we 
are of its past history, we trust its future 
will be even more brilliant. 

While endowment, building, apparatus 
and faculty are necessary for the existence 
of a college, its actual standing will be 
determined by the character of, and the 
work done by its students. On your 
shoulders rests the honor of the college, 
guard it as a sacred trust ! 

For the Association, 

L. R. Taft, Sec. 

It was with a feeling of pride that we 
listened to the greeting of the Western 
Association of our Alumni, by the mouth 
of President Goodell. Under the influence 
of his stirring words, every man present 
realized that the liouor of the college rested 
on him, and made stronger resolutions to 
quit himself like a man and never betray 
the sacred trust. 



FOOT-BALL. 

Aggie '94, 66 ; Amherst High School, 4. 

The Amherst High School eleven played 
an interesting game with the Aggie Fresh- 
men eleven on Aggie Campus Tuesday 
afternoon. 

The teams lined up as follows : 



HIGH SCHOOL 




AGGIE. 


Weaver, 


centre. 


Smith, 


Hitchcock, '91, 


1. guard. 


Boardmau, 


Atwood, 


1. tackle. 


Austin, 


Adams, 


1. end, 


Cutter, 


Gold, 


r. guard, 


Mauley, 


House, 


r. tackle, 


Park, 


Hltclicock, '93, 


r. end. 


Gifford, 


Emerson, 


quarter-back. 


Duffield, 


Haskell, 


1. half. 


Green, I. C, 


Bias, 


r. half, 


Starr, 


Fletcher. 


full-back. 


Toole, 




substitute. 


L. H. Bacon 


AGGIES. 


HIGH SCHOOL 


Goals. 


Touch-doivns. 


Touch-down. 


Starr, 4 


Starr, 4 


Adams, 1 


Toole, 5 


Gifford, 5 
Green, 4 





The game was opened with the High 
School having the ball which they soon lost 
by four downs. Aggie then made a touch- 
down and goal in two minutes after play. 
This was followed three minutes later by a 
second touch-down and goal by Starr. 
Starr being injured was substituted by L. 
H. Bacon. Adams secured the ball when 
Starr was injured and made the only touch- 
down for the High School. Aggies' pretty 
work with the V and several good gains by 








■i 



Business is Iiusiness. FRANK WOOD will get up 
Spreads (or the Boys this winter. Send your orders 
right along to get there first. 



M. A. C. STUDENTS SHOULD^GO TO 

BLODgETT ^ gLS^K 

FOR THEIR 



AND 



GENTS FURNISHING GOODS, 



Laundry Agency also. 



JOHN MULLEN, 



-DEALER IN- 



MEATS and PROVISIONS, 

VEGETABLES OP ALL KINDS IN SEASON, 

PISH AND OYSTERS, FOREIGN 

AND DOMESTIC FRUITS, 

AND CANNED 

GOODS. 

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E. R. BENNETT, 
Je\?7eler, 

Optician, 

Watchmaker. 

FINE GOODS ! LOW PRICES ! 

GOOD WORK WARRANTED. 

First Doop from Post Office, 



AGGIE LIFE. 



39 



Giftbi'd brought them three more touch- 
downs and a goal in the first lialf. Score, 
26—4. 

At the opennig of the second half, Starr 
was substituted for Toole. Aggie had the 
ball but soon lost it. A punt from Fletcher 
brought the ball inside the twenty-five 
yards line very near Aggies' goal, but by 
the plucky work of Starr, who carried the 
ball across the field, the sixth touch-down 
was scored. 

Good wqrk by Starr, Gifford and Green 
obtained eiglit more touch-downs and three 
goals for Aggie. The features of the game 
were the tackling of Bias and Haskell and 
punting of Fletcher for the High School, 
and the good all round team work of Aggie. 
Score, 66 — 4. 

Aggie '94, 18 ; Amherst '94, 0. 

The teams lined up, Amherst having the 
ball but after a series of ineffectual rushes 
the ball went to Aggie on four downs. Aggie 
now began to make telling rushes through 
Amherst's line, which soon brought the ball 
to Amherst's twenty-five yards line. Aggie 
now lined up for a wedge, simply for ap- 
pearance, while Starr took the ball, carrying 
it around Amherst's left end making the 
first touch-down. No goal. 

Amherst now punted the ball from their 
twenty-five yards line, but it was caught by 
Poole, and rushed into Amherst's territory. 
Eushes by Parker and Toole soon carried 
the ball within ten yards of Amherst's goal, 
and in the next rush it was carried over 
the line by Starr. No goal. Again Am- 
herst tried to rush the ball but they found 
Aggie's rush-line too strong, and on the 
third down resorted to a punt, which gave 
the ball to Aggie. Fine rushes by Aggie's 
backs secured the last touch-down of the 
first half a few minutes before the expira- 
tion of time. No goal. Score, 12 — in 
Aggie's favor. 

Aggie put the ball in play in the last half, 
making a good gain by a wedge. Amherst's 
rush-line now began to play a stronger 
game and soon had the ball on four downs. 
Amherst's men now tried the wedge, but 
found Aggie's rush-line equal to the occa- 
sion. At this period of the game Parker 
was injured while rushing the ball and was 
substituted by Howard. The ball now 
changed hands several times on four downs 
but Aggie soon began to use the wedge and 
after successive rushes the ball was carried 
over the line by Starr, making the last 
touch-down of the game. Goal was kicked 
by Starr. Score, 18 — 0. 

Amherst now played a strong game but 
was unable to carry the ball outside of 



Aggie's twenty-five yard line before the 
time was up. 

For Amherst, Munson and Haskell did 
good work, while Aggie's team was com- 
mendable throughout, Starr and Parker's 
playing being excellent. 

Teams lined up as follows: — 

AMHERST, '94. AGGIE, '94. 

Howes, centre, Smith, 

Snell, r. guard, Green, 

Wood, 1. guard, Boardman, 

Muusou, r. tackle, Parke, 

Haskell, (Capt.) 1. tackle, Austin, 

Trask, r. end, Gifford, 

Ward, 1. eud, Cutter, 

Fletcher, quarter-back, Putnam, 

Tucker, 1. half, Parker, 

Tyler, r. half, Starr, (capt.) 

Ide, full-back, Toole. 

Stedman, (sub.) Howard, (siib.) 

Time of game — 1 hour. 

Referee — Willard of Aggie. 

Umpire — Jackson of Amherst. 



"THE ALUMNI AND THE COLLEGE" 
REVIEWED. 

Your article "The Alumni and the Col- 
lege" while most admirable in many of its 
premises, reaches, I ^ink, unwarranted 
and unwise conclusions. 

The advantage and necessity of alumni 
representation on the Board of Trustees is 
set forth forcibly and well, but the argu- 
ments that justify representation do not 
necessarily justify dommation. While the 
Board of Trustees should be fairly repre- 
sentative it should in essence, I believe, 
consist of interested agricultural educators, 
and upon that ground and that alone should 
the majority be selected. If graduates of 
the college can outstrip others as agricul- 
tural educators — as a number undoubtedly 
do — let them be put on. 

As to alumni representation on the Fac- 
ulty the article is even more extreme. I 
quote: "But as vacancies occur let them 
be filled with Aggie graduates." This is 
exactly the same policy that has been per- 
sued in some of our classical colleges, until 
it became notorious as a method of pension- 
ing off dependent graduates. They, how- 
ever, have awakened and to-day are rivaling 
each other in seeking the best brains, be 
they native or foreign. Shall we not profit 
by their experience? 

In '82 the only endowment was theU. S. 
land grant fund, and with a faculty of but 
five, versatility was of prime importance to 
one who would fill a Professor's chair. 
Now with an increase of endowment of 
$35,000 (soon to reach $45,000) annually, 
with the co-operation of the State and 
Hatch Experiment Stations, it will be pos- 
sible to enlarge the Faculty to such an 
extent, that each chair can be filled with a 
specialist. When a vacancy occurs ques- 



MAILS. 
Mail leaves college for P. O. at 1 p. m. 
and 7 p. m. on week days. On Sunday it 
leaves at 4-45 p. m. At the P. 0. mails 
close as follows : 

Boston, 

7-45, 8-30, 10-15 a.m. ; 4-00, 6-45, 7-45 p.m. 

New York, Western and Southern States, 

7-45, 10-15 A. m. ; 4-00, 6-45, 7-45 p. m. 

Northampton, Springfield and Western 

Massachusetts, 

7-20, 10-15, 10-45 A. M. ; 6-45 p. m. 

Northern way, N. L. Northern, 

8-30 A. M. 

The treasurer will be at his office from 4 

to 5 p. M. on Saturdays throughout the 

term. 

The museum of natural history will be 
open to visitors from 3 to 4 each afternoon 
excepting Saturday and Sunday. 

The college library will be open from 2 
to 4 p. M. and from 7 to 8 p. m. each day, 
excepting Saturday and Sunday. On Sat- 
urday it will be open from 9 to 12 a. m. and 
from 2 to 4 p. M., and on Sunday from 2 
to 3 p. M. 

President Goodell will be at his office 
from 2 to 4 p. m. every afternoon except 
Saturday and Sunday. 



GEO. GRAVES, 



DEALER IN 



Painters' Supplies 

Personal attention given to Frescoing, Dec- 
orating and Paper Hanging, and all 
Interior and Exterior 
House Painting. 

Pleasant St., near L J, Spear's Shop, 



AMHERST COLLEGE 

mmmi steai vmm 

and Carpet Renovaving Establisliment, 



Aggie Agfent, H. M. HOWARD, '91. 

Work taken Monday delivered Wednesday. 
" " Wednesday delivered Saturday. 

S.A.TISr.A.CTI03Sr Ca-TJ.A^Ii.^^lSrTEBia, 

OFFICE AX BRINE'S. 

H. A. UTLEY, Manager. 



40 



AGGIE LIFE. 



tion not the applicant as to his color, poll' 
tics, or college, simply ask proof of pre- 
eminent fitness — if an Aggie, say "well 
done," but appoint no one simply because 
he is an Aggie — it helps neither he nor the 
College, in fad, it harms both. 

Scientific agriculture is still in its infancy 
yet the vast amount of investigation now 
underway will surely lead to a positive 
progress during the next decade. This 
will be a critical pe:iod for the college. 
Standing in the van-guard of agricultural 
education she will find her supremacy con- 
stantly contested by powerful and vigorous 
competitors — she cannot and must not 
jeopardize her proud position by any back- 
ward step. Let us hope that every vacan- 
cy in the Faculty will be filled by graduates 
— graduates who have proven themselves 
superior to all competitors. 

C. F. W. Felt, '86. 



ALUMNI. 

A. L. Kinney, '86, of Lowell has been 
very sick with typhoid fever, but is now- 
reported to be improving. 

Walter H. Merritt, '87, of Amherst was 
married to Miss Mabel A. Lovett of Ware, 
Nov. 12. 



IF YOU WANT TO GET OYSTERS IN ANY 
STYLE GO TO 

E. B. ARNOLD'S 



H^ 



0Y2TE]^. mi 



Students are attended slioil notice, 

Open all days of the week until 12 o'clock. 
Sundays from 9 a. m. to 12-30 P. M., aud from 
7 P. M. to 11 P. M. 

William's Block, Merchants' Row. 



The title page of this book was drawn and engraved by 

John S*"^:^'Sj 

6 Davis Street, BOSTON, MASS. 

The various publications of Bates, Bowdoin, Coll^y, 
Tui'ts, Mass. Agricultural College, Wellesly and Yale 
have used his work. He will submit sketches and cari- 
catures for your approval. 



OFFICE OF 



EDWARD A. THOMAS, 

FifiE/!tD Life Iprance 

UKAL ESTATE FOR SALE AND TO LET. 



Ojjicef Coolts JSloch, Amherst^ Mass, 



K B, DKKIIJgOI], D.D.g, 



^•DEI^TftL l^OOIQS,-^ 



KELLOGG'S BLOCK, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Office Hours, 9 to 12 a. m., 1-30 to 5 p. M. 



«S-Ether and Nitrous Oxide Gas administered when 
desired. 



.A.T THE 



j\MHERST GASH SHOE STORE, 

You can get the most for your money. 
BOOTS AND SHOES, RUBBERS, OVER- 
SHOES, SLIPPERS, TRUNKS, 
AND BAGS. 



REPAIRING NEATLY DONE, 



HAWES & STINSON, 

CASH ROW, AMHERST, MASS. 




AMHEF^ST HOUSE 



LIYERY, FEED, /ND SALE STABLE. 

T, L. PAIGE, Prop'R, 



HACKS TO AND FROM ALL TRAINS, OM- 
NIBUSES, HACKS, DOUBLE AND 
SINGLE TEAMS FURNISHED 
AT SHORT NOTICE. 
CAREFUL DRIA^EHS. FAIR PRICES. 

A-MjaiajtST, MASS. 



MR. A. X. PETIT'S CLASS 

IN DANCING WILL BEGIN DECEMBER 

SECOND. 



Those wishing to join or to take private lessons apply 
to A. X. PETIT, Box 382. 



Mass. Agf}icultui]al College, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHERST, MASS. 

We would inform the friends of the college, 
and the public generally, that we are prepared 
to supply 

FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND 

SHRUBS, SMALL FRUITS AND 

PLANTS, 

true to name, also 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 
all at the lowest price. 
For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and Small 
Fruits, address. 

Prof. S. T. Maynard, 

AMHERST, MASS 



THE AMHERST 



FURNITURE /ND CARPET STORE. 



A complete line of goods suited to the students' 
wants. 

BEDSTEADS, MATTRESSES, PILLOWS, 



STUDY DESKS AND CHAIRS , 
LOUNGES 



WINDOW SHADES, DRAPERIES, 

CARPETS, RUGS, ETC., ETC., 



AU goods Strictly Cash and at Ijowest I^rU-es. 



E. D. MARSH, 



XO PHCENIX ROW, 



AMHERST, MASS 



Sheet Music, 



Music Books, 



Strings 

FOR THE VIOLIN, BANJO, GUITAR, 

Cushman's Music Store, 



J, M, WAITE k SON, 



AND DEALERS IN 



Hats, Caps, Furs, Trunks, Bags, FurnisliinE Goods, 

Latest Styles iu Furnishings. Agent for 

Knox's and Youmau's Hats. Sole 

Agent for Pittsflelcl 

LaundrjT. 

Hats Repaired. Furs Renovated 

Give us a call before purcliasiug. 

NO, 5 fucenix row, amherst, mass. 



%m\itxBt Mome, 



o 

AMHERST, MASS. 



The undersigned is pleased to announce 
to his former patrons and others desiring 
Game Spreads or Dinners, that he is alwaj'S 
prepared to accomodate (at short notice i 
large or small parties. 

Ample dining room capacity for 200 peo- 
ple. 

LORENZO CHASE, Prop'r. 

" ,.(j DENTISTS. 3,.. 
C. S. GATES, D. D. S. 
T. G. HUNTINGTON, D. D. S. 

CUTI^MIt'S BLOCK, ylMHEJRST, MASS. 



OFFICE HOURS : 
9 A-. I^jI. to 5 F. IvI. 

Ether and Nitrous Oxide administered when 
desired. 



r^OWES ^ I^ELLOGG, 

DEALERS IN 

^•STUDEIJT'S SUPPLIES-^ 

FANCY GROCERIES, CROCKERY, CIGARS, 

CIGARETTES, TOBACCO, FRUITS 

AND CONFECTIONERY, 

LftH^P g00D2 ftI]D KEl^OSEI^B OIL, 

SDoors South of p. O., - AMHERST, MASS. 



EDWIN NELSON, 

Books and Stationery, 

Next door to Post Office, 
AMHERST, MASS. 



WOOD'S HOUSE 

»IJ^ D5ESSII]S WOW' 

Razors Honed and Shears Sharpened at 
short notice. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



C. R. KENFIELD, 

-^■JEWELEl^,^ 



IVood's Btockj 



Am.herst, 3£ass, 



SPECIAL. 



A Stem Wiiul ,and Set Waltlumi, H.Tiiipdeu, Elgin or II 
linois movemeHt in a fiolil Filled C;ise tor Sl.S.OO. 



Umbrellas covered while you wait, also dealer 
iu Guns, Rifles, Ammuuition and Sporting Goods 
of all kinds. Amateur Fhotograpliic Outfits and 
Supplies. Views and Pictures taken when de- 
sired. Views of Am.herst and Vicinity for .sale. 
Call and see before purchasing elsewhere. 

OS-WATCH AND CLOCK REPAIRING A SPECIALTY.Jg» 



J. L. LOVELL, 

^PHOTQg^ftPHE!;,^ 

DRY PLATES, COMPOUND DEVELOPER 

AND SENSITIZED PAPER, READY 

FOR USE. 



PRINTING FOR AMATEURS 



Done in the best manner. 



AMMEltST, MASS. 



a 0. pp 



H 



piercw Tailor, 



-A.i!va:i3:EE,s T, 



3S/I-A.SS. 



el. p. I^AWSON, 



DEALER IN 



WftT0HES, SLO0KS, JEWELl^Y, 

FINE POCKET CUTLERY, SILVER ANB 
PLATED WARE, OPTICAL GOODS 
CANES, SPORTING AND 
FANCY GOODS, ' 

Gold Pens, Fine Stationery 



REPARING NEATLY and PROMPTLY DONE. 



AMHERST, MASS. 



DwiGHfp (jQoor^E, 



BILLIARD AND POOL 



F.A.PLJ-iOPt, 



3 JPlKenix How (Vp-stairs), 

AMHERST, MASS, 



Massachusetts Agricultural College, 




iVamlxeriSt, ]\j;o^ss. 



^J 







VOL. I. 



AMHERST, MASS., DECEMBER lo, iSgo. 



NO. 6. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



VOL. I. 



AMHERST, MASS., DPXEMBER 10, 1890. 



No. 6 



WHERE DO YOU BUY 



Meerschaum Pipes? 
French Briar Pipes? 
Choice Tobacco? 
Sponges? 
Soap? 

Hair Brushes from 25 cts. up? 
Combs j'roin 5 cts. up? 
Choice New York Confectionery? 
Shaving Mugs? 
Shaving Soap? 
Lather Brushes? 

Cigarettes, fresli every two weeks? 
Tlie Best Soda in America? 
The Best Bay Rum? 
Imported Perfumes? 
Prescriptions prepared by licensed pharmacists? 
Imported Domestic Tooth Brushes? 

If you have not obtained these necessaries at 
DEUEL'S DRUG STORE, you have begun 
wrong. Deuel's is the leading Drug Store in 
Western Mass. , and keeps the largest assort- 
ment of goods at bottom prices. 



DEUEL'S D1& STORE, 

Amlierst Hoose Block, Aoilierst, M. 
HENRY ADAMS, 



PHARMACIST, 



NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORT- 
ED AND DOMESTIC CIGARS, 
CIGARETTES, ETC., 
MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, 
FISHING TACKLE AND SPORTING GOODS, 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, and Sporting 
and Springfield Rifles. 

Sunday and night calls responded to at resi- 
dence, first door west of Wood's Hotel. 



(Drugs, Medicines, 

TOILET ARTICLES, 

CONFECTIONERY, CIGARS, CIGARETTES 

AND SMOIvERS' GOODS. 



I'HYSICIANH' PJtESCB.IJ'TIONS CAJtE- 
FUI^jyT COMPOUNDJED, 



6;PH(ENIX ROW. 

Order your COA£ here. 



AN ENGLISH CHRISTMAS. 

The date of Christ's birth cannot be cer- 
tainly known, but it surely was not in late 
December, for that is tlie heighi of the 
rainy season in Judea, and shepherds would 
hardly have been watcliiug their Aocas by 
night on the hills at such a time. Milton 
iu his Hymn on the Nativity describes a 
far pleasauter season for Christ's birth 
when he says : 
"But peaceful was the night 
Wherein the Prince of Light 
His reign of peace upon the earth began. 
The winds with wonder whist, 
Smoothly the waters kissed. 
Whispering new joys to the mild Ocean, 
Who now hath quite forgot to rave, 
While birds of calm sit brooding on the charmed 
wave." 

All Christian churches have agreed to 
celebrate the Nativity on Dec. ibXh. The 
early churches made their Christmas festi- 
val to occupy the time of the old heathen 
festival of Saturnalia, which occurred at 
about this time, when the sun, having ar- 
rived at the winter solstice, began again its 
uorthcni journey and promised a return of 
life iu wood and field and stem. 

Of all the nations that keep Christmas 
as a holiday, there is none more joyful in 
it than the English. Thej' are not content 
with a single day's merriment but continue 
it from All-Hallows eve to Candlemas day ; 
the working people however making the 
most of Christmas day 

At dark on Christmas eve their festivi- 
ties begin ; the large candles are lighted, 
and the Yule log is brought in with much 
ceremony to be rolled into the huge fire- 
place. It is usually a large coarse root or 
trunk that will last all night. It is lighted 
with a brand which was carefully saved 
from last year's log, and while the Yule 
burns there is a merry drinking, singing, 
and telling of tales. This custom is s'.ill 
kept up in many rural districts in northern 
England where there are some superstitions 
connected with it. If a squinting or bare- 
footed person come to the house while the 
Yule is burning, it is considered an ill 
omen ; and if the log does not burn all night 
it is considered ill luck. 

The games are provided by the Lord of 
Misrule who is always sure to have a plenty 
of good ones for all. The mistletoe with 
its white berries is hung up in the kitchen 



to the imminent peril of all the pretty 
housemaids who, while passing under it, 
may be caught and kissed liy the young 
men, who each time in passing must pluck 
one of the berries, and when they are gone 
the piivilege ceases. 

The Waits, at twelve on Christmas eve 
begin their festive carolling and continue 
Uieir sweet hymns till morning light, 
throughout the village, hoping to merit 
enough attention to receive an invitation to 
feast at some manor-house on Christmas 
day. These little singers are generally 
very poor and so appreciate the feast all 
the more. 

The English gentleman usually invites 
all his neighbors and tenants to enter his 
hall at daybreak and partake of beer, black- 
jacks, toast, sugar, nutmegs, and good 
Cheshire cheese. The hackiu (great sau- 
sage) must be ready at daylight or else 
two young men must take the cook by the 
arms and run her around the market-place, 
till she is ashamed of her laziness. 

At dinner the old ceremony of serving 
the boar's head is observed thus : the butler, 
attended on each side by a'servant bearing 
a large wax light, enters with an enormous 
pig's head, a lemon iu its month, the head 
and dish decorated with rosemary, and 
places it at the head of the table. The 
peacock pie is another old English dish 
which is sometimes prepared for Christmas. 
The skin with the head and feathers is 
carefully removed and laid aside till the 
pie is cooked, then the head with its gilded 
beak is placed at one end and the tail is 
spread at the other. 

Next of fancy dishes is the Wassail Bowl 
co.-n posed of the richest and rarest of 
wines, highly spiced and sweetened. It is 
sometimes called Lamb's Wool. The host 
drinks first, aud, wishing a merry Christ- 
mas to all present, sends it around the 
table pronouncing it "the ancient fouutain 
of good feeling vvhere all hearts meet 
together." 

But with all his fancy dishes the lord of 
the manor does not forget the distinguished 
part allotted to "ancient sirloin, the stand- 
ard of old English hospitality." The table 
is literally loaded with substantials and 
presents an epitome of country abundance 
at this time of overflowing larders. 

It has been urged by some that too much 



42 



AGGIE LIFE. 



attention is given to feasting and festivities 
in the Englisli Cliristmas and too little to 
the solemnil\' and significance of the event 
it commemoi'ates. But this criticism is 
rather harsh, for the true Englishman 
believes Christmas to be a time for charity 
and his heart goes out in peace and love to 
every neighbor and friend. He~considers 
it a day for thanks and rejoicing and 
observes : 

"At Christmas be merry; and thankful withnl. 
And feast thy poor neighljors, the great and the 
small." 



OUR WINTER WORK. 

What shall I do with my spare time this 
next term? This is a practical question and 
one that should interest every stndent. 
Every man has some spare time, and every 
student comes to college with the intention 
of fitting himself for a wider spliere of use- 
fulness. All must have recreation, but in 
the coming winter term outdoor sports will 
be largely precluded, by inclement weather. 
VVork in the various de[)artments will not 
be so abundant, as during the fall and 
spring terms, and all tilings considered, 
every student will have ijiore spare hours 
during the winter term, than at any other 
time. Have we decided how to use this 
time, or have we given it no thought? Now 
is the time to look ahead and plan to use 
these spare hours profitably, as well as 
pleasantly. Every man has some special 
aptitude, and this time may well be used 
in developing this genius, but how can it 
be done? 

A man cannot afford to spend much extra 
time in hard study, because the regular 
College course demands his best abilities 
in this line, but he can lay out a course of 
easy, instructive reading on almost any 
suliject. 

Or the debate may offer greater attrac- 
tions than reading; if so. the W. I. L. 8. 
offers a grand chance for the development 
of your debating powers. Here a man 
may learn much, aside from the practice in 
debate, by spending a few hours looking 
up the suliji^cts discussed. 

To others. Natural History has a decided 
charm ; if so, what better can they do than 
to start in with others interested in the 
same line. In the Natural History society 
they may loaru much by reading and dis- 
cussion, and so prepare for active, intelli- 
gent work in the spiing. Many have col- 
lections now, that would be benefited \>y a 
few hours of woik and study spent on them. 
Those interested in Chemistry have already 
started in together on a course of weekly 



lectures and demonstrations given by each 
member in turn. 

There is no reason why those interested 
in Botany or any of the branches of Zo- 
ology could not |)ursue a similar course. 

Donlilless, Prof. Warner would be more 
than willing to place similar facilities at 
the disposal of those interested in his line 
of work. 

For those interested more directly in 
Agriculture, or its branches, Market- 
Gai'dening. Horticulture and Floriculture, 
there is the barn and the green-houses, in 
wliich there can be found much that is 
instructive in a practical way, and Inter in 
the season, the Farm and Botanic grounds 
will show still more, while the library 
abounds with good books ou all branches 
of Agriculture. 

Military is interesting in more ways than 
one, and those who look into it will find 
much worthy of special attention. 

If we return to the library, there are 
books on the laws of thought that are very 
interesliug for the deep thinkers. Psychol- 
ogy is really very interesting, as it treats 
of the laws that control our iiiteUectual 
activity. And last but not least, the Young 
Men's Christian Association should claim 
the attention of all. This organization is 
doing a grand work, and should receive the 
heart3' support of lovers of the truth, not 
only because it benefits others, but for the 
individual benefit accrued. Its meetings 
and Bible classes strengthen all who attend. 
Don't fail to spend some spare time there. 
With such privilege for self culture, is a 
man doiug justice to himself, yyhen he 
simply takes the regular college course, in 
a general way, and neglects these other 
means of improvement. 

'J'he college course is very good, and all 
recognize its value, but the world demands 
specialists, while we receive a general edu- 
cation. True, it is, that general knowledge 
is the foundation of a special education, 
but that does not preclude ns from taking 
a short special course outside of regular 
college duties. If we intend to be special- 
ists, when is a better time than now? 
Or, if we have not decided yet or do 
not care to be specialists, the training we 
receive, if we take a special course, would 
be invaluable in later lite. 

Sooner or later a man comes in contact 
with problems that he must solve alone; 
now if that man has developed his self 
reliance, he has a decided advantage over 
the man who does not knoiv himself. One 
of the greatest reasons why a man should 
mark out and follow a special course of his 



own, is that it developes his self control, 
as nothing else will. Without these two 
qualities, in some degree, a man can do 
very little. Let every man consider this 
carefully, and then determine to use a few 
spare hours in pursuing some kind of a 
special course. 



COMMUNICATION. 

Mr. Editor : — I noticed in your issue of 
Oct. 15, an article asking why we should 
not have a course in Electrical Science as 
an elective in our curriculum here. 

I am heartily In favor of this idea, and 
purpose in this paper to show one of the 
ways in which electricity may be applied 
to agriculture, and thus shovv the impor- 
tance of this study in an Agricultural college. 

For the last eighty years electrical in- 
vestigators have been experimenting as to 
whetherelectricityhas an influence on plant 
growth or not. Owing to the crudeness of 
the appliances and the inexactness of the' 
observations, diametrically opposite results 
were obtained by different scientists. But 
recently more exactexperiments have been 
performed in Germany under the superin- 
tendence of Herr Specnew, the I'esnlts of 
which are as follows : 

Seeds of rye, sunflower, and b?ans were 
submitted to the action of an electriccurrent, 
after having been soaked in water. These 
seeds germin-iited in half the time required 
for those not so treated, and the plants 
from these had larger leaves aud a brighter 
color, although with no increase in the 
yield. 

In another experiment an electric cur- 
rent was induced by connecting zinc and 
copper plates, p'aced at the extremities of 
the plot experimented on, by a wire laid in 
the soil, thus forming a battery. The plants 
in the plot thus influenced produced a larger 
crop, and vegetables of enormous dimen- 
sions. 

In a third experiment, a field of two 
acres was electrified by means of static 
electricity collected from the atmosphere 
by collectors united by wires. The plants 
in this field were, by this means, grown in 
a highlj- electrified atmosphere and showed 
an increased yield over those not so treated 
of 150 per cent., both in fodder and seed. 
This increase is explained by the fact that 
the slow discharge of static electiicity fa- 
cilitates the assimulation of Nitrogen by 
the plants. 

These results indicate what is. perhaps, 
a mode of forcing plant growth, which will 
revolutionize the present science of horti- 
culture. But to make this process success- 



AGGIE LIFE. 



43 



QJ 




COLLEGE TAILOR, 



Successor to F. H. Budding & Co,, Amtierst Tailors 



Fall Id Wliter Suilii, 



to 



ORDERS TAKEN FOR SUITS AND 

OVERCOATS, FULL DRESS 

SUITS TO ORDER. 



GENTS' FURNISHING DEPARTMENT, 
COLLARS, GUFFS and TIES, 
SUSPENDERS >ND UNDERWEAR. 

Foot-Ball and Gpiiaim Goods. 



J. B. BRIIS^E 



Merchants' Ro 



AMHERST, MASS. 



fill, the giu'doner or I'aniier must (lave a 
pi-nctic.ll knovvlcilge oC electricity, its prop- 
erties and a|)plianees, wliich c:in only be 
gained in an electrical course or in prac- 
tical work under an electrician. 

Farmer boys who intend to I'emaiu on 
the farm iMve not the time for the latter 
and therefore it is eminently appropriate 
and practical that such a course should be 
given in the M. A. C, or that, even if 
they do not practice "shocking" theircrops 
to increase their growth, they may under- 
stand in part, at least, the properties of 
one of the most potent factors in our nine- 
teenth century civilization. 



SEWAGE FE01\[ AN AGRICUL- 
TURAL STANDPOINT. 

In this day of economical and intensive 
farming, it would seem that ihe State Agri- 
cultural College farm ought to lead the 
farmers of the state in these, as well as in 
scientific matters. 

Much is being said about utilizing the 
sewage of our large cities, yet millions of 
dollars are annually spent in removing 
these waste products and sending them out 
to sea either directly or by way of rivers. 
In the latter case, the pure water of the 
river, besides being rendered unfit for use 
of man or beast, is made a source of pollu- 
tion and disease to the country bordering 
its course. 

How often do we hear this system depre- 
ciated in words of bitter contempt, while 
on the other hand, and pictured in glowing 
terms, are the profits that would fill the 
pockets of farmers and market-gardeners 
in the vicinity of these great centers of civ- 
ilization, were the sewage properly turned 
to account in irrigating their thirsty lands. 

But when we look to the M. A. C. farm 
for a sensible and economical system of 
sewerage, what do we find? 

The College buildings are located on a 
rise of land where the facilities are the best 
that could be desired for turning the steady 
stream of college sewage directly onto the 
sloping field to the west. Here it might 
be distributed with very little expense and 
made to yield a handsome interest on the 
investment. 

True it is that great improvements are 
being made about the farm, but how is it 
that hundreds of dollars are more profitably 
invested in draining an old pasture than 
tens would be if spent in laying out a 
pro[)er system of sewerage? If the latter 
was done, the value of several .icreson the 
slope would probably be nearly doubled ; 
and it would certainly seem more economi- 



cal to increase the bulk of crops grown 
near the barn than lo attempt to raise more 
at a distance. 

The sewage, with the present arrange- 
ment, pouring into the ravine year after 
year in the same locality, makes a most 
unsightly spot in our natural arboretum, 
killing the trees and contaminating the 
brook . 

Our instructors are endeavoring to show 
us that this is a wasteful practice, and not 
calculated to teach us practical agriculture. 
We are glad to learn that the matter is 
being investigated, and that an effort is 
being made to exemplify some of the prin- 
ciples taught in the class-room. 

The problem of sewage utilization is one 
that has been worked over and studied 
upon for ages. As population increases, 
and towns grow into cities, it is of vital 
importance that a method be discovered 
whereby these enormous quantities of 
polluted water may be freed from their load 
of filth before passing into the rivers to 
convey putrid matter and disease germs to 
other communities. 

May it not be that some active and ob- 
serving intellect of "Aggie" will suggest 
the remedy for this growing evil, and thus 
prove a benefactor to the human race. 



HIAWATHA'S ADVICE .TO HIS SON. 

(Bij a Longfellow.) 
Would you get an education 
Of a scientific nature, 
Wiiich will make you in the future 
Fit for any occupation, 
Fit for any undertaking 
That may call you into action ; 
You sliould now begin to study 
On the common English branches, 
Such as Mathematics, Grammar; 
So that when you're somewhat older 
You m.ay pass examination. 
And be thus prepared to enter 
At the Agricultural College, 
Which was built by Massachusetts, 
At the noted town of Amherst 
For the practical education. 
For the scientific training 
Of young men just such as you are. 
Now at this new institution. 
At this newly founded college 
Are taught the art of " engineering " 
And the science of surveying, 
Which with other useful studies 
Far excels the coui'se of classics, 
" Taught in yonder Amherst College." 
Which, if memory serves me rightly, 
Are in our days little needed. 
Very little brought in practice ; 
Therefore, take'your father's counsel. 
Study with soul undaunted 
With a will that needs no pressing. 
Persevering, hoping, longing. 
Soon to enter as a Freshman 
In the class of 1880 
At this Agricultural College. 
Speaking thus, did Hiawatha 
Counsel give his son Wenona, 
Sitting in his lonely wigwam, 
By a bright and cheerful fire, 
On a frosty night in winter. 
While his " Laughing Minehaha," 
With the children which she bore him, 
Seated were upon the he.arth-stoue. 
Listening to the conversation. 

— Irving Gazette, 



44 



AGGIE LIFE. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Published Fortnightly by the Students of the 
Mass. Agricultural College. 



Terms $1,00 per year, in advance. 



Single copies, 10c. 



Entered at tlie Post Otilce as second-class mail matter. 

BO Ann OF EDITORS : 

E. P. FELT, Editor-in-Chief, 
O. V. B. LAGE, Business Manager, 
A. G. EAMES, '01, H. N. LEGATE, '91, 

J. L. FIELD, '»3, G. E. TAYLOR, '93, 

G. F. CUELEY, '9S. 



Address all communicatious to the Business Manager. 



The new board of editors for Aggie 
Life is to be elected the last of next 
term. In order to insure the future pros- 
perity of the paper, onl}' the best men 
should be elected to fill tlie position. 
Therefore, we propose next term, to pub- 
lish the writer's initials with his article, 
unless specially requested not to, so that 
each class may vote intelligently for its 
quota of editors. 



Aside from the news, only two articles 
in this issue were written by under class- 
men. One by a Sophomore, one by a 
Freshman, while the Juniors have contri- 
buted nothing. Whose fault is it? The 
editors are always glad to receive articles, 
but they can hardly he expected to spend 
more time persuading a man to write, than 
it takes to write the desired articles. Every 
man should consider it his business to write 
several times a term for the paper, an over 
production can be easily prevented, while 
plenty to select from will produce a better 
paper. If any man has the gift of a poetic 
mind, we would be especially glad to 
receive poems from him. At present there 
is a call for a few more light humorous ar- 
ticles rather than for more thouohtfu' pieces. 
In a word it takes all kinds of literary work 
to produce the best paper, and we would 
be pleased to receive a large variety. 



Are the walks around college to be as 
slippery next term as they were last winter? 
With good concrete as we have around 
college, is it asking too much that it be 
kept clean? Last winter the walk was cov- 
ered with from one to several inches of 
mingled snow aud ice for most of the win- 
ter terra, and tire outlook seems to indicate 
a similar condition ne.>ct term. There is 
no doubt but that the students can slide 
along some way ; it may be a very good 
form of exercise, but to a visitor, it must 
appear ludicrous to see over one hundred 
men running aud sliding back and forth to 



recitations, when so little labor would be 
required to remove all the snow and ice 
from the vi^alk. The least a visitor might 
expect, is that the walk between the dormi- 
tories and the old chapel be kept clean and 
free from ice. The expense involved in 
keeping the walks clean would be slight, 
compared vrith the greater convenience. 
Snow can easily be shoveled from concrete, 
especially before it has been trodden much, 
and the sun will quickly melt any pieces of 
ice that are frozen on. There are plenty 
of men in college who would be glad to 
keep the walks free from snow. The snow 
plow removes the greater part of the snow ; 
what is wanted now, is simply to remove 
the rest before it becomes trodden into icy 
snow, and then we will have clean walks. 



The foot-ball .season is over, and while 
our team's victories have not been mani- 
fold, we are far from being ashamed of 
that team's work. Considering the disad- 
vantages under which they labored, their 
record lias been more than satisfactory. 
Last year our foot-ball prospects were 
under a cloud. The Faculty frowned on it, 
and many students thought it an unsuitable 
game for us to attempt, so but little money 
was raised and only two games were played. 
This fall there was a reaction and much 
enthusiasm was displayed in regard to the 
game. A fair sum of money was raised 
and the services of a coacher were secured, 
but the coacher left us on short notice and 
his duties devolved upon the captain. He 
placed gretit confidence^ in the "turtle 
crawl" as Cornell contemptuously calls the 
"V trick," aud the "waltz step" or "riglit 
or left wing'' was the result of careful 
study on his part. Moreover, he played 
an uiisurpassd individual game, counting- 
fatigue, and exposure to injury as nothing. 
The time of piactice was limited, as drill 
allowed only two good, full, practice games 
and three half hour games in a week. 
Then, there being no league for us to win 
the clianipionsbip of, it was no easy matter 
to sustain the interest in practice, except 
when a game was directly in view. More- 
over, our g;imes v/ere not with preparatory 
schools, but all against heavier teams than 
ours. Nevertheless, our team bore away, 
in the aggiegate, 30 points against our 
op[)onents 124. Ip face of all the odds 
we have stated, could men lacking the 
advantages of good gymnasium practice 
do more? The exit of the Senior class will 
lake away several fine players from the 
team, but we hope that their places will be 
more than filled by members of the class 



of '94. The latter have made a phenome- 
nal record in tying (he score with the 
Sophomores and beating the Amherst 
Freshmen. Let them continue as well as 
they have begun, cultivate what material 
they already have and develope unsus- 
pected resources, and we will hope to see 
the college put a strong, well selected team 
in the field next fall, with the possibility of 
a pennant to grace the foot-ball picture at 
the end of the season. 



While talking with a former classmate 
not long since, old faces were recalled and 
recollections stirred that had been growing 
fainter and more obscure ever since Fresh- 
man year; not entirely obliterated, but 
tucked away in one of memory's pigeon- 
holes, and not being in demand for daily 
use, had been jostled aside and hid from 
sight by matters of daily interest. This 
resulted in a reverie on the mutations of 
college life. To us at least, each succes- 
sive year has seemed like a separate epoch. 
The friend and comrade of one year is an 
entirely different person from the same 
man a year previous or subsequent. That 
which is praiseworthy and desirable to the 
Sophomore seems petty and unimportant 
to the Junior. Perhaps when a decade or 
so has separated us from our college life 
these things will assume their true value 
aud the different epochs appear parts of a 
well-iemembered whole. Then the first 
events in our experiences here will be as 
vividly remembered as thOse that are trans- 
piring to-day. The record of college days 
will be stamped indelibly on our minds. 
Although we sometimes declare college dull 
and monotonous, and anticipate the joys of 
a more active life, we are not apt to find 
after-life so pleasureable by contrast. In 
fact it is doubtful if we shall ever (hid our- 
selves surrounded bj" so select a coterie of 
conipanious or living under conditions so 
favorable to enjoyment as while we are 
students. Perchance "the meuiorj' of col- 
lege dajs" may be to some of us the only 
light in the darkness of the care and 
trouble of a business life, and it should be 
our aim then to make the most of college 
associations, that this light may not be 
darkness. The best way to make the most 
of these associations is to cultivatH a strong 
college spirit. Class and society senti- 
ments are fine things in their places, but 
they should never be allowed to supplant or 
interfere with college feeling. The man 
who never abuses the confidence of his 
college mates in order to advance the inter- 
ests of his class or fraternity is the man 



AGGIE LIFE. 



45 



who is sure to reflect the most credit on all 
three. The man who as a student, always 
discliarges, to the best of his ability, all 
trusts reposed in him by his fellows, who 
bears himself, both in and out of the class- 
room, with manly independence, who sub- 
scribes all that his purse affords to all 
projects for the betterment of his college, 
who is above playing the sneak for any 
purpose whatever, and who is ever ready 
to lend a helping hand to a struggling fel- 
lou', is the man who in later years will not 
be ashamed to grasp his old college males 
by the hand, and is the man whom his 
Alma Mater will be proud to own. 



GLEANINGS. 
This term closes Dec. 19th. 
'92 dissected lobsters last week. 
Next term begins Jan. 6th, 1891. 
Nest issue will appear Jan. 14th. 
The tax fiends are around ouee more. 
Tha Gymnasium is lighted up evenings 
now. 

The Old Chapel clock is now away for 
repairs. 

Knight is catching rats for scientific 
purposes. 

Lage '91 was on the sick list a few days 
last week. 

P. E. Davis '94 is a recent addition to 
the college. 

Our pond has given us only a few days 
good skating as yet. 

Lyman, to Prof. : " Do corals multiply 
by fiction (fission)?" 

Tlie Reading Room Directors will meet 
on the last of the week. 

For some reason or other Graham '92 
failed to return on time. 

Reviews are now in order and examina- 
tions will follow shortly. 

Drill will probnhly occur in the drill-hall 
the reuiaiiider of the term. 
! The Jiniiors had an examination in Mar- 
' ket Gardening last Saturday. 

A notice is now posted soliciting bids 
for carrying the mail next term. 

Dec. 2 — Wells tries to walk on the water 
in the pond and doesn't succeed. 

The Library was closed several evenings 
.last week as there was no electi'ic light. 

Meeting of the N. Y. AUunni to-day. 
Professors Mills and Wnrner will attend. 

Dec. 2 and 3— The South College reci- 
tation rooms were very cold in the morning. 
The new uniforms were inspected last 
Monday. The Cadets reported by com- 
panies. 



Our cliemists have combined for mutual 

study under the direction of Dr. Wellington. 

President Goodell attended a meeting of 

the State Board of Agriculture held at 

Worcester, Dec. 2. 

Dec. 4 — Ilawkes milks the new cow. 
Dec. 4 — '93 takes a decidedly close 
"bolt" on Prof. Brooks. 

Lieut. Coriiish will introduce the Position 
and Aiming Drills in order to give more 
variety to the Winter drill. 

W. S. Pember, '93, returned Dec. 3d 
after an absence of several days, caused by 
the ill health of his father. 

The engraver has delayed 92's Index a 
week or more. W'e hope to see it out be- 
fore the term closes however. 

The Y. M. C. A.. had a very interesting 
missionary meeting last Sunday evening. 
The subject was Home Missions. 

About all of the students made their 
appearance promptly on the morning of 
Dec. 2, having enjoyed a pleasant recess. 

We understand thatStarr '94, is to leave 
us at the end of this term. He will be 
missed very much, especially in athletics. 

Lieut. Cornish invited his Staff to dine 
with him hist 'J'hanksgiving day. All went 
home but Gay, who accepted the invitation. 
Prof. Brooks showed the Seniors some 
magic lantern views of representatives of 
the respective breeds of domestic animals. 
The recitation room in the Botanic Mus- 
eum has been somewhat improved. This 
time the floor and desks received attention. 
W. I. L. S. held no meeting last Friday 
night on account of having exercises Sat- 
urday, to make up for the preceding Mon- 
day off. 

J. S. Loring, '90, and J. M. Herrero ,'90, 
completed their labor on the topogra[)hical 
survey of the Botanic department last 
Saturday. 

Professor Maynard delivered a very in- 
teresting lecture on iMicrosopic Botiiny be- 
fore the Natural History Society last Mon- 
day evening. 

A. M. Castro, '90, left; here Dec. 1 for 
his home in Brazil. He has been taking 
an advanced conise in chemistry for the 
past few months. 

Foramen laceratura basis cranii and such 
terms float vaguelj' through the Senior's 
brain, while Slrongylocentrotus drobachien- 
sis still worries the Juniors. 

In view of the fact that the cannon are 
too old to assist in Freshman Night cere- 
mouieS; it might be advisable to liouse 



them as soon as possible. They look chilly 
and disconsolate out by the goal posts. 

The Institute o.^ Teclinology claims one 
third of the new fund now in the hands of 
the State Treasurer on the old grant of '62. 
Hearing to-day before tiie Governor and 
Council argued by the counsels of the two 
institutions. 

The day before Thanksgiving there was 
a general exodus from college for home. 
A number of the students clubbed together 
and used a mileage ticket on the Central. 
The ride was enlivened by the usual amus- 
ing incidents. The Reading Express was 
crowded on the way back, one car being 
filled with Smith College students. 

The dam has sprung a leak, caused by 
the accumulation of water behind it, as a 
result the pond has lowered woefully. As it 
seems impossible to build 'a dam at this 
place, the attempt might be more success- 
ful lower down, or if that fails let us have 
a good dam built under cover ; one that 
we can look at, and that won't leak, if 
there is no water around. 



PRAYER MEETING TOPICS. 

Dec. 11. Doers of the word, James 2: 

20-26. E. J. Walker. 
Dec. 14. Fruits of Fellowship, I John 3 : 

1-11. E. D. White. 
Dec. 18. "It is more blessed to Give than 

to Receive," Deut. 15: 'i-ll ; II 

Cor. 9 : 7, 8. C. L. Brown. 
Jan. 8. The Time for Seeking God, Eccles 

12 : 1 ; Isa. 55 : 6-7. H. F. 

Staples. 
Jan. 11. Evil Speaking, James 4 : 11; I 

Pet. 3: 10. U. E. Crane. 



GIFTS. 

Imported Tamworlh boar and sow, by 
J. Miintgomery Sears of Boston. 

The Library has received si.xty volumes 
on miscellaneous subjects from the estate 
of Julius Rockwell, Lenox. Also a number 
of agricultural works from the estate of C. 
L. Flint, Boston, formerly a Trustee of 
the college and for many years Secretary 
of its Board. 



A REMONSTRANCE. 
A recent issue of a certain comic weekly 
contained a caricature supposed to rc|)re- 
sent a foot-bail match between two promi- 
nent collrges, and bewailed the fact that 
the public should be able to find enjoyment 
in such a brutal contest. It is safe to say 
that siicli figures as were therein portrayed 
were never seen ou a foot-ball field, and 
the style of play may have possibly belong- 



46 



AGGIE LIFE. 



C;H, S™ERS0\& CO,, 



CASH DEALERS IN 



'■PII]E gL0THI]3&,^ 



Hats, Caps, Umbrellas, and Gents' 
Furnishing Goods. 



CASH BOW, 



AMHERST. 



Sandeph k Thompson, 



CASH DEALERS IN 



Dry and Fancy Goods, 

HOSIERY, RIBBONS, AND SMALL 
WARES OF ALL KINDS. 



AMHERST, MASS. 



BOOTSi^SHOES 

FOR EVERYBODY. 



A FINE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, 
BALS. AND CONGRESS, 

A FULL LINE OF 

UTTBBEE, GOOIDS, 

FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 

Repairing Done Promptly. 
T, V\A. SLOAN, 

3 PHCEXIX RO W. 



S, J, SULLIVAN, 



DEALER IN 



Second- Hand Clothes 



FUHNITUEE. 



'Orders promptly attended to. 
P. 0. Box, 319, AMHERST, MASS. 



ed to a period of twelve years ago. The 
principal object of the figures in the cut 
seemed to be to flatten, by free use of tlieir 
fists, the noses of their opponents, or failing 
in tliat, to remove any superfluous hair that 
miglit be attached to the latter's heads. It 
was, in fact, only an ilUistralion of the 
remarkable ability, on the part of some, to 
moralize on a subject concerning whicli 
they know nothing whatever, and about as 
pertinent as a treiitise on Acoustics written 
by a person deaf from birth. 

To be sure, foot-ball is not a game for 
timid people or invalids, but for vigorous, 
active young men it is one of the most 
healthful and manly of oiit-door sports, and 
plays a not unimportant part in character- 
building. It is true that when the Rugby 
game was first introduced iato this country 
the rule in vogue was to "smite, and spare 
not," but that was a long time ago, and in 
these days of advisory committees and 
newspaper criticism, it has become the 
exception and is fast vanishing. It is 
hardly complimentary to intelligent Ameri- 
can audiences to think that they would 
tolerate the maltreatment of players by 
either side. It is claimed, that if a man is 
a brute, that this qualit3' will be shown on 
the foot-hall field, but this is true of all 
places. 

Now, having, as we hope, cleared foot- 
ball in the minds of our readers from the 
imputation of brutality, let us turn our 
attention to the question of the safety of 
the game. 

Until recently it was considered a haz- 
ardous sport for even well built young men, 
but thanks to those whose untiring efforts 
are reducing the game to an exact science, 
the element of danger is fast being elimi- 
nated. The recent introduction of the 
game into the Military and Naval Acade- 
mies of West Point and Annapolis respec- 
tively is a more powerful argument in its 
favor than any words of mine could be. In 
institutions, where so strict an attendance 
on regular exercises is required, no game 
would be allowed that would tend to in- 
capacitate cadets to perform their duties. 
Perchance the spoit was introduced there 
not merely for a pastime, but as an adjunct 
to military training, which indeed it is. 
The Duke of Wellington, when once asked 
to tell the secret of his splendid victory, 
exclaimed, "the battle of Waterloo was 
fought on the foot-ball field of Rugby,'' 
thereliy meaning that the self-control and 
ability to think quickly in the moment of 
danger, which qualities he had imbibed in 
contests with the leather, were the very 





w 



Business is business. FRANK WOOD will get up 
Spi-e.i(ls for the Boys this winter. Send your orders 
right along to get thiTO first. 

Do you want a nice warm Ulster? 

A Toboggan Ttiqtie to wear skat-" 
ing or sleighing? 

If so call on ns. 

We have some dandy Black 
Cheviot Suits. We have a big 
trade at your college and use the 
boys right. 

ELODSET^ ^ gLfl!{K 

JOHN MULLEN. 



-DEALER IN- 



MEATS and PROVISIONS, 

VEGETABLES OF ALL If INDS IN SEASON, 

FISH AND OYSTERS, FOREIGN 

AND DOMESTIC FRUITS, 

AND CANNED 

GOODS. 

Palmer's Block, Main Bti"eet. 



E. R. BENNETT, 
Jew^eler, 

Optician, 

Watchmaker. 

FINE GOODS ! LOW PRICES ! 

GOOD WORK WARRANTED. 

First l])oor from Post Office. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



47 



qualities tliatgave him tlie victory over tbe 
"Little Corporal," whose forces, iu number 
discipline and experience were superior to 
his owu. 



SCIENCE AND ART. 

The j'oung man of to-day as he is about 
to start out for college, sees before him two 
great roads ; the one professing to lead 
him on toward the aoquisitii>n of a knowl- 
edge ol' the arts, the other directing him on 
and on toward the fertile fields of science. 
If he puts the whole of his mental faculties 
to bear on the subject, if he carefully con- 
siders the importance of the situation in 
which he is placed, he will not discard the 
latter course without a great deal < if hesi- 
tation. For, Which of these two courses of 
study is the nobler, the more elevating, and 
the more beneficial to mankind, is one of the 
most important questions coming before 
the public mind to-day. 

In former years, the colleges of arts and 
classics greatly exceeded those of science 
both iu number and apparent popularity. 
In fact, It vvas recently that many of those 
of the latter class were instituted. At 
present, the rapidly increasing number of 
students in all of our American scientific 
colleges, certainly affoi-ds great encourage- 
ment to the earnest devotee of science. 

Let us consider the question mentioned 
above and see if there is r^^ason for this 
increase. The first part reads, which is 
the nobler and more elevating of the two 
courses? What can be more ennobling, 
and more elevating to the mind of man than 
the study of those things placed on earth 
by Nature's own hand ? For what better 
and nobler purpose can a man live, than 
that of devoting the greater part of his 
time and powers to the things placed on 
earth in a crude state, as it were, that he 
may bring them into a stale of usefulness? 
Then again, we read, which is the more 
beneficial to mankind? I say the scientific 
course by all means. Who but the scien- 
tist made the loaded cars to move, the 
factories to turn out their valuable 
products? He has developed all of our 
knowledge of chemistry, which is becoming 
more and more necessary in every-day life. 
He it is who has demonstrated before the 
eyes of tlie curidus world that electricity, 
that invisible something, is tlie power, and 
the power which promises to displace all 
former achievements in the scientific world. 

Look at the scientist as he stands before 
the public to-day. How many names are 
there in civil life, to Tvhich we hear more 
praise attached than those of Stephenson, 



Ericsson, F'rankliu, Edison, ami innumer- 
ahle others of their stamp? Some may say 
that the scientist is inclined to slum affaiis 
of state. It may be true to a certain ex- 
tent that he avoids such matters, but there 
is no reason why he should do so. In fact, 
it has not always been the case. Thomas 
Jefferson was a scientist, so vvas Franklin, 
yet they faithfully served their countiy in 
times of great need. 

True, the scientist's observation is so 
great, that he vaa.y seem at times to be lost 
within himself. But all this time he is 
taking in facts that passed by the eye of 
his non-scientific companion unobserved. 
Would not this quality in a man add great- 
ly to the prospects of his becoming a grand 
politician ? There is no reason why it should 
not, and we trust that science herself will 
demonstiate its truth at no distant date. 

Therefore, we would say to every young 
man, pursue a scientific course of study. 
While we do not doubt that a man's mind 
is greatly benefited by the study of Latin 
and Greek, nor would we for au instant 
uuder-rate their educational value, yet we 
say, study science first, then if the oppor- 
tunity presents itself, acquire a knowledge 
of classics. 



IF YOU WANT TO GET OYSTEItS IN ANY 
STYLE GO TO 

E. B. ARNOLD'S 

students are attended at short notice. 



Open all days of tlie week until 12 o'clock. 
Sundays from 9 a. m. to 12-.30 p. M., and from 
7 p. M. to 11 p. M. 

William's Block, Merchants' Row. 



The title page of this book was drawn and engraved by 

John S^^'^li'S) 

6 Davis Street, BOSTON, MASS. 

The various publications of Bates, Bowdoin, Colby, 
Tuft.i, Mass. Agricultural College, Wellusly and Tale 
have used liis work. He will submit sketches and cari- 
catures for your approval. 



OFFICE OF 

EDWARD A. THOMAS, 

Fii|E/fiD Life {insurance J\ge\t, 

HKAL ESTATE FOR SALE AND TO LET. 



Office, Coohs JiloclCf A.ni?terst, Mass, 



MAILS. 
Mail leaves college for P. O. at 1 p. m. 
and 7 p. m. on week days. Ou Sunday it 
leaves at 4-45 p. m. At the P. O. mails 
close as follows : 

Boston, 

7-45, 8-30, 10-15 A.M. ; 4-00, 6-45, 7-45 p.m. 

Neiv York, Western and Southern States, 

7-45, 10-15 A. M. ; 4-00, 6-45, 7-45 p. m. 

Northampton, Springfield and Western 

Massachusetts, 

7-20, 10-15, 10-45 A. M. ; 6-45 p. m. 

Northern way, N. L. Northern, 

8-.30 A. M. 

The treasurer will be at his office from 4 

to 5 p. M. on Saturdays throughout the 

term. 

The museum of natural history will be 
open to visitors from 3 to 4 each afternoon 
excepting Saturday and Sunday. 

The college library will be open from 2 
to 4 p. M. and from 7 to 8 p. m. each day, 
excepting Saturday and Sunday. On Sat- 
urday it will be open from 9 to 12 a. m. and 
from 2 to 4 p. m., and on Sunday from 2 
to 3 p. M. 

President Goodell will be at his oflSee 
from 2 to 4 p. m. every afternoon except 
Saturda}' and .Sunday. 



GEO. GRAVES, 

DEALER IN 

Painters' Supplies 

Personal attention given to Frescoing, Dec- 
orating and Paper Hanging, and all 
Interior and Exterior 
House Painting. 

Pleasant St., near L J, Spear's Sliop. 



AMHERST COLLEGE 

CO-OPERATIVE SIEAI tAUNDRY 

and Carpet Renovavni [stablisliment. 



Aggie Agent, H. M. HOWARD, '91. 



Work taken Monday delivered Wednesday. 
" " Wednesday delivered Saturday. 

S-A-TISI^u^CTIOKT a-T:TA.E,^'»,.IsrTEBI3. 

^ OFFICE at BRINE'S. 

H. A. UTLEY, Manager. 



48 



AGGIE LIFE. 



TO CONTRIBUTORS. 

"Whatever you have got to say, my friends, 

"Whether witty, or grave, or gay. 

Condense as much as ever you can. 

And say it in the clearest way ; 

And whether you write on rural affairs. 

Or particular things in town. 

Just a word of kindly advice. 

Boil it down. 

"When writing an article for the press, 
Whether verse, or prose, just try 
To utter your thoughts in the fewest words. 
And let them be crisp and dry, 
And when it is finished, and you suppose 
It is done exactly brown 
Just look it over again, and then 
Boil it down. 

For editors do not like to print. 
An article lazily long. 
And the general reader does not care 
Por a couple of yards of song. 
So gather your wits in the smallest space. 
If you'd win the author's crown, 
And every time you write, my friends, 
Boil it down. 

— Exchange. 



ALUMNI. 

D. W. Dickinson, '90, is in a dental 
office at Brockton. 

E. D. Howe, '81, of Marlboro received a 
flattering offer of $1,800 by an Agricultural 
College. 

F. W. Brown, '87, instructor in English, 
Wesleyan Academy, Wilbraham. 

E. J. Dole, '88, Attorney-at-Law, care 
of Barclay & Carpenter, Los Angeles, Cal. 

E. A. Jones, '84, Eockville, Mass. 
Joel B. Paige, '71, Supt. of Farm. Hart- 
ford, Conn. 

F. W." Wood, '73, Civil Engineer, care 
111. Central R. R., 58 Michigan Ave., 
Chicago. 

A. F. Shiverick, '82, clerk, Tobin M'f'g 
Companj', Chicago. 

A. H. Taylor, '82, breeder of cattle, 
Plainview, Nebraska. 

C. A. "Whitney, '89, Upton, Mass., at 
home. 

Llewellyn Smith, '84, Bradley Fertilizer 
Company, Quinsigamond, Mass. 

"W. F. Carr, '81 , Supt. of City Railroads, 
Minneapolis, Minn. 

A. M. Castro, '90, Turiz de Fora City, 
Minas State, U. S. of Brazil. 

MARRIAGE. 

Samuel Chester Damon, '82, to Elizabeth 
Taylor Willard, at Wilmington, N. C, 
Dec. II, 1890. 



K B, mKIIiSOI], D. D, S, 



KELLOGG'S BLOCK, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Office Hours, 9 to 12 a. m., 1-30 to 5 p. M. 



«®-Ether .and Nitrous Oxide Gas administered when 
desired. 



.A-T TKCB 



>MHERST GASH SHOE STORE, 

You can get the most for your money. 
BOOTS AND SHOES, RUBBERS, OVER- 
SHOES, SLIPPERS, TRUNKS, 
AND BAGS. 



REPAIRING NEATLY DONE, 



HAWES & STINSON, 



CASH ROW, AMHERST, MASS. 



AMHERST HOUSE 



L1YERY,FEED,>ND SALE STABLE. 



Prof. W. to Freshman class: ""Why 
does oil float on water?" Lewis: "Be- 
cause it is greasy." 




T. L PAIGE, Prop'R. 



, A. X. PETIT, 

TEACHER OF DANCING. 

Evening Class every Tuesday evening. Private lessons 
when desired. Hall in Dickinson's Block (over Lee & 
Phillips'). P. O. address, Amherst, Mass. 



Mass. Agi|icultural College, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHERST, MASS. 

We would inform the friends of the college, 
and the public generally, that we are prepared 
to supply 

FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND 

SHRUBS, SMALL FRUITS AND 

PLANTS, 

true to name, also 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 
all at the lowest price. 
For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and Small 
Fruits, address. 

Prof. S. T. Maynard, 

AMHERST, MASS 



THE AMHERST 



FORHITURE7IND CARPET STORE. 



A complete line of goods suited to the students' 
wants. 

BEDSTEADS, MATTRESSES, PILLOWS, 



HACKS TO AND FROM ALL TRAINS, OM- 
NIBUSES, HACKS, DOUBLE AND 
SINGLE TEAMS FURNISHED 
AT SHORT NOTICE. 
CAREFUL DRIVERS. FAIR PRICES. 

AMBERST, MASS. 



STUDY DESKS AND CHAIRS, 
LOUNGES 



WINDOW SHADES, DRAPERIES, 

CARPETS, RUGS, ETC., ETC, 



All goods Strictly Cash and at Lowest Prices. 



E. D. MARSH, 



lO PHOENIX ROW, 



AMHEKST, MASS. 



Sheet Music, 



Music Books, 



Strings 

FOR THE VIOLIN, BANJO, GUITAR, 



Cushman's Music Store, 



A.H/mS'XiST. 



L M, WAITE k SON, 



f^OWBS ^ l^BLLOGG, 



DEALERS IN 



^■2TUDEP'S SUPPLIES-^ 

FANCY GROCERIES, CROCKERY, CIGARS, 

CIGARETTES, TOBACCO. FRUITS 

AND CONFECTIONERY, 

LftrQP GOODS MID KE^02E]5E OIL, 

SDoors South of f. O., - AMBEJtST, MASS. 



AND DEALERS IN 



Hats, Caps, Furs, Tronks, Bags, Furnishing Goods. 

Latest Styles in Furnishings. A^eut for 
Knox's and Yoiiman's Hats. Bole 
Agent for Pittsfield ' 
Laundry. 

Hats Repaired. Furs Renovated 

Give us a call before purchasing. 
NO. 5 Fn<EWIX BOW, AMBEUST, MASS. 



%m\^txsi Mouse, 



o 

AMHEKST, MASS. 



The undersigned is pleased to announce 
to his former patrons and others desiring 
Game Spreads or Dinners, that he is always 
prepared to accomodate (at short notice 
large or small parties. 

Ample dining room capacity for 200 peo- 
ple. 

LORENZO CHASE, Frop'R,-- 

.,g^PENTISTS,^a, 



EDWIN NELSON, 

Books and Stationery, 

Next door to Post Office, 
AMHERST, MASS. 



WOOD'S HOUSE 

HMK D5ESSII2K 500II]S, 

Razors Honed and Shears Sharpened at 
short notice. 

AMHEKST, MASS. 



C. R. KENFIELD, 

^•JEWBLEl^,^ 



Wood's Block. 



A.»iherstf Mass. 



SPECIAL. 



A Stem Wind and Set WMltliam. Hnmpden, Elgin or II 
linois movement in a (toUI Filled Cjise for ©15.00. 



Umbrellas covered wliile you wait, also dealer 
in Guns, Rifles, Ammunition and Sporting Goods 
of all kinds. Amatenr Photographic Outfits and 
Supplies. Views and Pictures taken when de- 
sired. Views of Amherst and Vicinity for sale. 
Call and see before purchasing elsewhere. 

«S=WATCH AND CLOCK REPAIRING A SPECIALTY..®? 



J. L. LO\^ELL, 



c. s. GATES, D. D. s. NpHOTOKl^ftPHE]^,^ 



T. a. HUNTINGTON, D. D. S. 



CVTLES'S BLOCK, AMHERST, MASS. 



OFFICE HOURS ; 
e A.. Ts/L. TO 5 F. Ti/L. 

Ether and Nitrous Oxide administered when 
desired. 



DRY PLATES, COMPOUND DEVELOPER 

AND SENSITIZED PAPER, READY 

FOR USE. 



H.O, P 



H 



H 



pieFCM TailOF, 



.A-3VCia:EI?.ST, 



3VC.A.SS. 



el. p. FJAWSON, 



DEALER IN 



WiiTSHEg, KLO0Kg, JBWELl^Y 

FINE POCKET CUTLERY, SILVER ANB 

PLATED WARE, OPTICAL GOODS 

CANES, SPORTING AND 

FANCY GOODS, 

Gold Pens, Fine Stationery 



REPARING NEATLY and PROMPTLY DONE. 



AMHERST, MASS. 



DWIGHT CQoof^E, 



BILLIARD AND POOL 



iP^^PLX-iOPt, 



PRINTING FOR AMATEURS 

Done in the best manner. 



AMECERST, MASS. 



3 I'hwn'ix How ( Up-stalrsJ, 
AMHERST, MASS, 



assachusetts Agricultural College, 



F" 



|^ ^ lUst^ 




A^UmllL^t^^t^ ^^^^L^^m 




VOL. I. 



AMHERST, MASS., JANUARY 14, 1891. 



NO, 7. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



VOL. 



AMHERST, MASS., JANUARY 14, 1891. 



No. 7 



WHERE DO YOU BUY YOUI^ 

Meerschiinm Pipes? 
Freucli Briar Pipes? 
Clioice Tobacco? 
Spone:es? 
Soap? 

Hair Brushes from 25 cts. up? 
Combs from 5 cts. up? 
Clioice New Yorli Coufectionery? 
Sliaviiig Mugs? 
Sliavlng Snap? 
Latlier Bruslies? 

Cigarettes, fresh every two weeks? 
The Best Soda in America? 
The Best Bay Rum? 
Imported Perfumes? 
Prescriptions prepared by licensed pharmacists? 
Imported Domestic Tooth Brushes? 

If you have not obtained these necessaries at 
■DEUEL'S DRUG STORE, you have begun 
wrong. Deuel's is the leading Drug Store in 
Western Mass., and keeps the largest assort- 
ment of goods at bottom prices. 



DEDEL'S Dli; STORt 



Amherst Hoose Block, Amherst, lass, 

HENFiY ADAMS, 

PHARMACIST, 

NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, ■ - AMHERST, MASS. 

Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORT- 
ED AND DOMESTIC CIGARS, 
CIGARETTES, ETC., 
MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, 
FISHING TACKLE AND SPORTING GOODS, 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols,, and Sporting 
and Springfield Rifles. 

Sunday and night calls responded to at resi- 
dence, first door west of Wood's Hotel. 

(Drugs, Medicines, 

TOILET ARTICLES, 

CONFECTIONERY, CIGARS, CIGARETTES 

AND SMOKERS' GOODS. 



rHYSICIA-lfS' PRMSCKIPTIONS CAME- 
FULLr COMFOUNDED, 



61PHCENIX EOff. 

Order your CO^^Ij here. 



RESULT OF HIAWATHA'S ADVICE. 

(BY ANOTHEU HAND.) 

Those who read our little record, 
Of the happenings at Aggie ; 
Know that in a recent issue 
Spake a sage, long since depax-ted. 
Telling how great Hiawatha 
Gave good advice to Wenona ; 
To his first-born son Wenona. 
And 'tis fitting now, that we should 
Give to you our present knowledge 
Of the life of young Wenona ; 
So that you may form opinion. 
Whether Hiawatha's counsel, 
Wc>rtliy was of such a sachem ; 
Whether, too, his ofispring's conduct 
Justified his expectation. 
Now Wenona was a scholar . 
Of no very small attainments. 
And he had that perseverance, 
That undaunted perseverance, 
Which is always very helpful, 
In pursuing any study. 
So it happened that he entered. 
This, our glorious Aggie College, 
In the class that Hiawatha 
Mentioned in their conversation. 
In the noted class of '80. 
Much he studied while in college. 
Much he learned of every science 
Taught within the walls of Aggie. • 
Much of Botany and English, 
Much of Chemistry, that science 
So renowned the whole world over ; 
Much of so-called higher science. 
Of man's brain and soul and spirit, 
And their everyday relations 
To the facts of Economics. 
While in agricultural knowledge. 
He was simply best and perfect ; 
Understood the art important, 
From its A B C's so simple. 
To its diflScult relations 
Unto every other science. . 
But you must not think Wenona 
Spent his whole time on his studies. 
During his four years in college. 
For he wasn't any chicken, 
Was no newly-hatched young chicken. 
So he hazed the verdant Freshmen ; 
Played at foot-ball and at base-ball. 
And 'twas sometimes even whispsred. 
That he was not quite neglectful. 
Of the girls, those darling creatures, 
Whose society so lightens 
All the cares of student life. 
Thus with hard work and amusement, 
Mingled in their due proportions. 
Passed Wenona's life in college. 
For four years won't last forever, 
Even though they're very pleasant. 
So one day in 1880 ; 
In the pleasant, sweet, June weather. 



Sto.od Wenona on the campus, 
With two bulky i-oUs of parchment. 
With two rolls of graven writing. 
Which declared to every person. 
That Wenona was proficient 
In the studies taught at Amherst, 
At the Agricultural College, 
Of the state of Massachusetts ; 
And by virtue of the liuowledge 
Gained at that great institution ; 
Was entitled to the sheepskin 
Of Boston University. 
Though Wenona passed the ordeal, 
Of the pleasant June Commencement, 
With a great amount of honor, 
And unusual reputation. Wrinkled 
Still his brow was drawn, and 
Wrinkled with his earnest thinking, 
How he best could use his knowledge. 
How he best could make a living; 
But he stood not long in thinking. 
For he saw he was best fitted 
For some scientific business. 
Where the practical instruction 
He had got at Aggie College, 
Should be brought in practice. 
So he took a situation 
In a station for performing- 
Many useful experiments. 
In the line of agriculture, 
And those arts which are mechanic. 
Now he is a wise professor 
In an Agricultural College, 
Of a state not far from this one ; 
And is very greatly honored, 
For his practical attainments. 
For his knowledge of the questions. 
Which perplex and vex those persons 
Now engaged in Agriculture, 
And the common avocations, 
Whereby most of us, poor mortals, 
Have to earn our bread and butter. 
Other things are not denied him. 
Gold he has In generous measure, 
Though he does not want his millions, 
He has all that heart could wish for ; 
Everything he needs or longs for. 
Now the moral of this story. 
Is that if you are a young man, 
You should go to Aggie College ; ■ 
That the royal road to fortune, 
Lies within its open portals. 
And that if you have grown older, 
And have sons, whose age allows it, 
You should straightway send them to it. 
That they may receive Instruction, 
Which shall make them come in winners 
In the race of life before them, 
Make them stronger in the struggle ; 
Useful also to their country. 
Men who shall be missed among us 
On departing from this planet, 
To the Kingdom of Ponemah, 

To the land of the Hereafter ! 

H. N. L. 



5° 



AGGIE LIFE. 



EDUCATION. 

The earliest education is that of the fam- 
ily', and from here is developed the embryo 
which is to spring up into an intellectual 
and peaceful mind, or into a low, weakened 
and degraded intellect. ''A good educa- 
tion," says Plato, "consists in giving the 
body and soul all the perfection of wliich 
they are susce|)tible." Keat says, "There 
is within every man a divine ideal, the type 
after which he was created, the germs of a 
perfect person, and it is the office of edu- 
cation to favor and direct tlie growth of 
these germs." Education is the means by 
which every rising generation is put into 
possession of all the attainments ol pro- 
ceeding generations. 

The first schools were those of the Priests 
superseding the diviners and judges whose 
only aim seem to be to abuse the credulity 
of their fellow men. The necessity of the 
training required for ceremonials and for 
the accomplishments of reading and writ- 
ing, was the starting point for the new 
universal system of schools. From the 
education of the priests grew the secular 
education of countries where the priesthood 
did not exist as a separate body. The 
Greeks were the first to develope a science 
of education distinct from ecclesiastical 
training. They divide their subjects of 
study into two classes, music and gymnas- 
tics, the first embracing all mental and 
spiritual and the second, all physical train- 
ing. 

The literary education of the earlier 
Christians was obtained in the Pagan 
schools, in the imperial academies whicli 
flmirished down to the filteenth century. 
The first attempt to supply a special edu- 
cation for Cliristians was made at Alex- 
andria. 

The education of the Middle Ages was 
either that of the cloister or of the castle ; 
the object of the one being to form the 
monk, and of tiie other the knight. Within 
the monasteries, many of the idols of talse 
education, existing to-day, have tlieir root. 
The discipline was hard, the rod was the 
rule, and hatred of learning, antagonism 
between the teacher and pupil, the beliil 
that no training was effectual unless repul- 
sive and tlistasteful and that no subject is 
proper for instruction which is acquired 
with ease and pleasure, were the outgrowth 
of them. The seven arts of monkish train- 
ing were, German, Dialectics, Rhetoric. 
Music, Ariih)netic, Geometry and Astron- 
omy and furnished a sevon years course. 

About the year 1430 Vittrnio da Feltrc 
introduced an entirely new system, exact- 



ly opposite in its procedure from the Monk- 
ish system. He held that "letters should 
be taught playing ; the rules of grammar 
few and short ; every means of arousing in- 
terest in the work should be fully employ- 
ed ; idleness, above all things is to be 
avoided." 

The advance of education in the seven- 
teenth century begins with Charlemagne. 
This monarch re-established the palatial 
school, in which the sons of some of the 
nobility were educated with his own chil- 
dren. In this school the course of instruc- 
tion embraced all the learning of the age. 

Somewhat less than a century after 
Charlemagne, King Alfred revived the 
schools in England, which had been almost 
extinguished by Danish invasions. 

Nevertheless the effect of his efforts was 
but short lived after his death, and it was 
not till the 14-15 centuries that learning 
was revived. Many of the noblest knights 
of the period could neither read nor write. 

During the time preceding the revival 
of learning, female education was on the 
decline, in fact in none of the early cen- 
turies was it customary for the women to 
become educated. 

A writer of the thirteenth century defines 
the proper education of woman as, "know- 
ing how to pray to God ; to love man ; to 
knit and to sew." 

In 1483 in some of the colleges, notably 
that of Montaign, from which the worthy 
Calvin graduated, a severe and almost 
barbarions discipline was ordained, com- 
bining labor, fasting and pitiless punish- 
ments. 

In 1528, Luther, with the aid of some 
others, drew up the plan of study, which 
was followed in the Protestant common 
schools of Germany till the close of the 
century. Their course embraced the study 
of reading, singing, grammar. Latin, Ger- 
man, dialectics, and rhetoric. 

About the year 1640 the Jesuit system 
of education, a secondary Catholic oi'der, 
founded by Ignatius Loyola, came into ex- 
istence and flourished till the beginning of 
the eighteenth century. One secret of 
their success was in their use of the powei' 
of emulation. The victors of their school 
oratorical contests were rewarded by 
crowns, swords, shields and hinees, in the 
manner of the victois of an Olympic con- 
test. 

John Locke says of this, "Emulation is 
the chief spring of aclion ; knowledge is 
far less valuable than a well trained mind." 

One of those worthy of notice who have 
tried to improve existing methods, in ad- 



vance of his age, was Ratke, born in 1571. 
He anticipated some of the best improve- 
ments in the method of teaching which 
have been made in modern times, bnt was 
rewarded for his labors by persecution and 
imprisonment. Can we wonder that edu- 
cation has progressed so slowly, when such 
pains have been taken to suppress those 
who have devoted themselves to its im- 
provement. 

Rousseau in the eighteenth century pub- 
lished a system of education, which pre- 
sents an ideal view of domestic culture 
most strongly in contrast with the circum- 
stances of his own life. The early educa- 
tion ot the child is, according to him, of 
the greatest importance. Nothing should 
appear to the student until he is prepared 
to grasp it without difHculty ; the attain- 
ment of knowle<lge thus coming almost un- 
consiously by a series of easy steps. The 
child should not subject himself to habit, 
but be independent of everything about 
him and be master of himself. Education 
was to become, by this system, an amuse- 
ment. 

Near the close of the eighteenth century 
Bell and Lancaster originated the idea of 
mutual instruction, and Froebel the Kin- 
dergarten. The latter furnished a means 
of teaching young children by playing audi 
amusement. 

The education of the present time is best 
described by Spencer. He asserts that 
"we shall atitain the best results by closely 
studying the development of the mind, and! 
availing ourselves of all our energies." 

Education is still but partially developed 
and much in the art of teaching is yet to 
be learned. We cannot with justice leave i 
this subject without further mention of the ' 
education of women. From the earlier 
centuries in which women were rarely 
educated beyond that which was required 
for the performance of their daily duties, j 
the popular sentiment has been gradually' 
changing until now, schools and colleges 
are provided for the education of women 
which vie with the best institutions of 
learning of the other sex. Women in the 
l)rofeSbions are continually increasing and 
many of our most brilliant authors are of 
the gentler sex. 

G. E. T. 



UNION LECTURE COURSE. 
Next Wednesday evening Jacob A. Riis 
will lecture on the social condition of our 
great cities, illustrating his lecture by ster- 
eopticon views from photographs taken by 
liimself in the slums of New York. All 
should hear him. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



51 



d 





COLLEGE TAILOR, 



Successor to F. H. Budding & Co., Amlierst Tailors 



Fall aid Wiiter Silti, 



10 



ORDERS TAKEN FOR SUITS AND 
OVERCOATS, FULL DRESS 
^ SUITS TO ORDER. 



GENTS' FURNISHING DEPARTMENT, 
COLLARS, CUFFS and TIES, 
SUSPENDERS >ND UNDERWEAR, 

Foot-Ball aod Gpnasimii Goods. 



J. B. bri:n^e 



Merchants' Row, 



AMHER3T, MASS. 



IN MKMORY OF OUR BROTHER 
HENRY H. LEARNED. 

Wherms, It lias been the will of our Heavenly 
Father to summon our friend and brother, Henry 
B. Learned, to a higher and better world, and 

^Vhl;rfas, We recognized in him sterling qual- 
ities that command the respect of all. There- 
fore be it 

Resohrd, That we, members of tlie College 
Shakespearean Club, do mourn our loss, which 
we believe to be his gain ; and be it 

Resoloerl, That we extend our heartfelt sym- 
pathies to his parents in their bereavement ; and 
be it further 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be 
sent to his parents, and that anotlier copy be 
placed in the records of the 0. S. C. 

Henry M. Howard, 1 Commiitee 
Ephuaim p. Felt, [• for the 
Mdrrat Ruggles, j C. S. C: 



Whereas, Our Heavenly Father lias seen fit to 
remove from our midst our beloved classmate 
and companion, Henry Bond Learned, and 

Whereas, He was loved and respected by all 
who knew him for his faithful efibrts and cheer- 
ful disposition, both in the class-room and on 
the campus. His truthful ways and kindness 
toward all, ever commanded our admiration. 
Therefore, be it 

Resolved, That we hereby extend our deepest 
sympathy to his bereaved parents in the hour of 
their affliction, making their loss our loss, and 
their sorrow our sorrow. And be it further 

Besohed, That a copy of these resolutions be 
sent to his parents, and also published in the 
college publication. 

T. S. Bacon, ") Committee 
C. F. Walker, \ for 
T. F. Keith, j the Class. 
There is no death ! But angel forms 

Walk o'er the earth with silent tread; 
They bear our best loved ones away, 
And then we call them "dead." 



GENERAL EFFECTS OF A COLLEGE 
COURSE. 

As sometime in the future, we gather 
around a common hearth and discuss this 
matter, the question may naturallj' occur, 
Wliat better wa^- could we have spent those 
four years of our youthful career? Those 
of us who have done justice to ourselves 
will invariably answer none. 

The average young man residing at home 
has a constant dread as to what shall become 
of him on going out from beneath his ma- 
ternal wing. Now, what effect does college 
life have on this state of things? It creates 
a sort of independence and self-reliance in 
the man which cannot fail to be of value to 
him in future years. It promotes in him 
the idea that he was created for some high- 
er purpose than that of tru.stiug to perhaps 
the meagre support of a poor father or the 
tendei care of an overthoughtful mother. 

Again, compare the constitution of the 
avenige college graduate with that of the 
man who has been shut up in a mill or store 
all his life. The contrast is a very percep- 
tible one. In the one case you see a man 
with muscles well developed bj' the con- 
stant practice of athletic sports, and the 



whole system regulated in such a manner 
that his body will be well able to withstand 
whatever brain work he may undeitake. In 
the other instance you frequently observe 
a man destitute of that abundance of 
muscle marked in the first case, his face 
pallid, his whole person betraying to the 
observant eye a feeble constitution which 
can rarely accompany with any great degree 
of success the enormous amount of work 
required of an experienced business man's 
brain. 

There are, of course, exceptions to both 
of these instances, but it is, as a rule, 
among the latter class that the physician 
exercises his wisdom in treating chronic 
dyspepsia, Bright's disease, and many other 
prevailing maladies. 

Look at the young man of eighteen as 
he starts out for college, and once again on 
his return after graduation. You cannot 
but notice the change in his bearing, the 
ease of his conversation and the broadness 
of his intellect, compared with the shy, 
unmanly fellow of four years previous. We 
all know that it would be absurd to think 
of a man passing his examinations through 
out the course without gaining considera- 
ble book knowledge and general informa- 
tion. Therefore as these effects would be 
made manifest to a certain degree on the 
less studious man, much more obvious 
would be the result in him who attended 
faithfully to all the duties prescribed for 
him. 

So when the young man has completed 
the course of education provided for him 
at home by the public, we would by all 
means advise him to go to college and thus 
gain for himself a lively disposition, an 
enviable constitution, and .in increased 
brain power which will be of great value to 
him during his whole life. 

G. F. C. 



Under the Presidency of S. D. Foot, '78 
the Massachusetts Agricultural College 
Club of New York, held its fifth annual 
dinner Dec. 10th. The Club gladly wel- 
comed as its guests Professors Mills and 
Warner, who reported as to the couditioD 
of the college. Speeches were also made 
by Trustee Bowker, '71, S. C. Thompson, 
'72, E. B. Libhey, '74, H. Myrick, '82, W. 
P. Birnie, '71, and others. A resolution 
was adopted petitioning Congress not to 
irrigate the arid lands. Officers elected 
were: Pres't, A. W. Dickinson, '74 ; 1st 
Vice-Pres., E. H. Libbej, '74 ; 2ud Vice- 
fres.. Dr. C. E. Young, '81 ; Permanent 
Secretary-Treasurer, A. W. Lublin, '84; 
and Choragus, Dr. J. A. Cutter, '82. 



52 



AGGIE LIFE. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Published Eortnightly by the Students of the 
Mass. Asjricultm'al Collea;e. 



Terms $1,00 per year, in advance 



Single copies, 10c. 



Entered at Uie Post Office as second-class mail matter. 

SOAJtD or EOriORS: 

E. P. FELT, Editor-in-Chief, 
O. V. B. LAGE, Business Manager, 
A. G. EAMES, '91, H. N. LEGATE, '91, 

J. L. FIELD, 'a2, G. E. TAYLOR, '92, 

G. F. CURLEY, '9:1. 

Address all comnnniioalions to the Business Manager. 



After a sliort vacaliou Aggie Life 
appears once move. She is indebted to all 
for the heaity support received and en- 
deavors to be worlhj' of more support this 
term. Still there is very much room for 
improvement, and her editors will be more 
than happy to receive any practical sug- 
gestions, that will add to her success in the 
future. 



The competitive drill for the position of 
Color Company last term veas very close ; 
it certainly accomplished its design, which 
was to increase the interest in drill. 'J'here 
is no more work in drilling well, while the 
hour lasts, and it is much more satisfactory 
to all concerned. At the end of this month 
there will be another competitive drill, 
which will be even closer than tlie last one, 
but there should be no extra drills for any 
company, because some men cannot afford 
to take the extra time from thtir work ; 
then all will st;ind on the same ground and 
can work for the colors duriug drill hours. 



Now that the drill hall is lighted, it is 
hoped all Will exercise there, in preference 
to the Reading Room. It seems necessary 
to remind some men that the reading room 
is not a gymnasium, but is designed simply 
for reading. Last term a number of i)apers 
were badly torn by men when engaged in 
wrestling, and if a visitor should look at 
the stools, he might form the impression, 
that they were used in some kind of war- 
fare. The directors of the Reading Room 
for the past few years have been introduc- 
ing various improvemints, and more will 
follow if the room is used as it should be 
and not as a wrestling hall. 



" Time is money." Punctuality is one 
of the duties a man owes his fellow men. 
We all agree that it is a crime to steal even 
a few cents, but many men seem to think 
it is perfectly proper to steal anoilicr man's 
time, by compelling him to awail their move- 



ments. Such tardiness is most noticeable 
at the various meetings of the students, 
with perhaps the exception of the Y. M. C. 
A. The general impression seems to be, 
that thej' will begin about ten minutes aftn- 
the ajuounced time, consequently only a 
few will be on time, and the rest come in 
late. The tardy men really rob the puuct- 
ual men of the time they spend waiting. 
It is just as easj' to be on time as a little 
late, and everything moves with much less 
friction. Where is a better place to form 
habits of punctuality, than while at col- 
lege? Let ns begiu now. The h.abits 
formed here will be the hidiits of our life, 
to a great extent. 



Travelling around South college between 
breakfast and chapel time, a man notices 
the various occupants of the rooms sitting 
around shivering with overcoats on. On 
feeling the radiators he quickly withdraws 
his hand — burnt, not with heat, bnt with 
cold. About 8-10 a. m. the steam may be 
heard slowly passing through the pipes. 
And this is not the whole story ; a visitor 
in the early evening hours is apt to find 
cold rooms between 6 and 9 p. m. Is this 
a defect of the heating apparatus, or is it 
the result of negligent firing? The matter 
should be investigated and the trouble 
righted. Cold rooms are unhealthy, and 
to an average man who rooms in South 
College, and attends the lectures on hygiene, 
such instruction must .nppear as mockery, 
when the state, itself, fails to have put in 
practice the instiuction it so freely gives. 



Last term's experience in the Washing- 
ton Irving Liternry Society showed that 
there is considerable material in the Fresh- 
man class. The questions were well 
handled ; the speaking was interesting and 
to the point. Many men found they could 
speak in public, and even reason while on 
their feet ; the latter accomplishment is 
especially valuable. This term there will 
be a chance to use these debating powers 
still more, and it is to be hoped that the 
whole college will unite and make these 
meetings all they sliould be. Last term 
many of the Freshmen hardl3- understood 
what the airb of the W. I. L. S. was, till 
the term was nearly passed, bnt this term 
ignorance is no excuse, and the W. 1. L. 
S. should be much benefited by more 
material from '94. These meetings take 
considerable time, and the studious man 
may naturally prefer his books, but let him 
ask himself "should a college man be satis- 
fied with book kuowledge alone?" Certainly 



not. The well educated, man developes 
the practical part of his education, while 
mastering the theory. The ready man is 
the man who is sought after, and not the 
man who knows it all and still cannot use 
that knowledge at the proper time. 



The Young Men's Christian Association 
has begun '.he year b^' observing the week 
of prayer. Special meetings were held 
last week on Wednesday, Friday and Sat- 
urday evenings, besides the regular prayer 
meeting on Thursday evening. This is 
surely commendable. The demand of the 
age is for true men — men who live what 
they profess — men who are not prond, not 
anxious to occupy honorary positions, but 
who are willing to work even in obscurity. 
The Y. M. C. A. has over fifty men, that 
are about evenly divided into active and 
associate members. Here is a body of 
youi g men who can do much to influence 
the moral tone of the college ; it is not so 
much the numbers, as the qnality of the 
members, that determines the influence and 
standing of the Y. M. C. A. among the 
other college organizations. The Y. M. 
C. A. room shonld be a place, and is in a 
great measure, where all may meet as 
Christian brothers, irrespective of class or 
society. If the members put the same 
eneriiy into their Christian work as in 
other fields of labor, the results will richly 
repay the Cost. Every man in college is 
interested in seeing the college second to 
none, and the more the Y. ]\I. C. A. does 
to elevate the moral standing of the college, 
the more general will be the support from 
all. There is no organization in college 
that receives more attention than the Y. 
BI. C. A. ; it is right that It should be so. 
As an organization, it is adapted to young 
men, especially college students, and as 
such demands the careful consideration 
and support of all. 



A PHENOMENAL EVENT. 

Jan. 12. At six o'clock this morning, 
the barometer at the Hatch observatory 
registered the phenomenal record of 28.4 
inches, or fully .4 lower than it has ever 
registered at thi.-s place, and .2 lower than 
the pheuoinenal record observed at 152 
Brant St., N. Y., in 1888, which was then 
the most wonderful barometric record ever 
known. At that time there was a gale of 
wind. This morning there was a wind 
pressiu'e of 15 lbs. to the foot, and a veloc- 
ity of 54 miles per hour. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



53 



GLEANINGS. 

Lehiiei't, '93, has returned. 

Babbit, '94, Las left college. 

Don't miss the lecture to-night. 

Wells, '93, has not yet returned. 

An odd slip : Half right to the face. 

Icy sidewalks as usual greet the eye. 

Carpenter, '91 carrie.s the mail this terra. 

There is some artistic skating on the 
pond. 

Some of last term's marks seem to be 
floating at large. 

The Y. M. C. A. held several special 
meetings last week. 

The battalion is having aiming and fir- 
ing drill at present. 

The gold medal is a "dandy." It is 
well worth working for. 

A novel question: "How much land is 
required to an acre of cow?" 

One class has 29 hours of exercises a 
week, besides three hours drill. 

Co. B will have to work to keep the 
colors at the nest competitive drill. 

The Juniors are having General History 
instead of English Literature this term. 

Keep your good I'esolutions for the New 
Year, aud study harder than ever before. 

About all the cadets appeared in their 
new uniforms at the first drill of the term. 

Last Saturday, J. B. Hull, '91, while 
skating, rescued a small boy from drowning. 

The Aggie Life heartily wishes a happy 
and a prosperous New Y'"ear to all Us 
readers. 

Williams, '90, was almost suffocated 
Jan. 1, by coal gas. He is still ill from 
the effects of it. 

The ice on the pond, though not very 
even or glassy, permits skaters to indulge 
in their healthful pastime. 

Amateur boardiug clubs were numerous 
last vacation. Board, 13 cents per day. 
lOutfits now for sale cheap. 

The New England Magazine and The 
Holiday are two publications that will be 
in the Reading Room shortly. 

Mr. Cauavan made manifest his good 
will towards the foot-ball team by giving 
them a turkey supper, Dec. 13. 

Several fellows returned late this term 
owing to a little misunderstanding on their 
part as to what day college began. 

Every man should attend the Union 
Lecture Course this term. Admission very 
low, while the lectures will be good. 



The electric light fixtures at the New 
Chapel have been repaired so that we again 
have the library open in the evening. 

This winter every man ought to practise 
in the drill hall so as to be sure and carry 
off the laurels of the field day next spring. 

Is a room emitting disngreeable odors in 
a proper sanitary condition? There seems 
to be one or more in the west entry of 
North College. 

There are three new members^ in the 
Freshman class. They are E. W. Morse 
of Brockton, G. O. Sanford of Wiuchendon 
and J. H. Jones of Pelham. 

The Morris Drum Corps appeared at 
Dress Parade last Friday, in new uniforms. 
Willi practice and patience we expect to 
have a good corps by June. 

The M. \. C. Boarding CUili received a 
sample of Strawberry Hill pork. It was a 
superior article ; such pork should command 
a high price in any market. 

F. A. Ober, formerly of '72, Govern- 
ment Commissioner for the Exposition at 
West ludies. Address, care of National 
Museum, Washington, D. C. 

The Atliletic Association is not dead 
yet. As the football season lasted so long 
last term, it was not thought advisable to 
light the drill hall till this term. 

Rauufcy, '93, hurt his head on the ice a 
few days before last term closed and dur- 
ing the vacation he injured his back by a 
fall. Tridy, strength is not everything. 

The prizes offered by the W. I. L. S. 
last term for the best debating, were 
awarded as follows: 1st prize, E. A. 
Hawkes, '93 ; 2nd prize, F. H. Hender- 
son, '93. 

Now the drill hall will be lighted every 
evening, and the apparatus put into good 
order at once. Some new apparatus will 
be put in, as a rowing machine, dumb-bells, 
boxing-gloves, etc. 

We expect there will be an individual 
competitive drill the last of February for 
the gold medal to be presented to the best 
drilled man, by Rev. J. B. Drenuan. The 
medal is now on exhibition at college. 

F. H. Zabriskee, formerly of '77, now in 
partnership with Dr. A. C. Deane of Green- 
field, is one of the most popular and rising 
young doctors of this vicinity. His engage- 
ment with Miss Fanny, daughter of Dr. 
Deane, has just been aunotmced. 

Every man should lake considerable 
class pride in the field day, and do all in 
his power to secure the bulk of tlie prizes 
for his own class. This will add very 



much to the interest of i\\i occasion, aud 
the field day will be an overwhelming suc- 
cess. 

The l>oarding Club officers for this term 
are : 

H. M. Howard, '91, 1st Director and Pres., 

M. A. Carpenter, '91, 2d " " Vice-Pres., 

M. Ruggles, '91, 3d " " Sec. and 

I-I. M. Thomson, '92, 4tli " " [Treas., 
F. H. Henderson, '93, 5th " 

At the next meeting of the W. I. L. S. 
the following question will be discussed: 
Resolved, that Canada should bo annexed 
to the United States. Howard, '91, 1st 
aff., Ruggles, '91, Istneg. ; Thomson, '92, 
2nd aff., Stockbridge, '92, 2nd neg. Cur- 
tis, '94, Declamation. 

As soon as there is good skating on the 
Conn. River there will be several races held 
there, such as a mile race, a hundred yard 
dash, and a four hundred yard dash, all 
open to the whole college ; suitable prizes 
will be awarded, and it is hoped there will 
be considerable competition. 

Result of tlie Competitive Drill held 

AVednesday, Dec. 17th, 1890: 

Company A, 457 points ; time, 1.5 minutes. 
" B, 4G9 " " 13 " 

" C, 4-13 " " 16 " 



D, 457 " 



13J 



Order of companies, B, D. A, C. 

The College Shakespearean Club elected 
officers for the teim last Saturda_y night as 
follows: Pres., L. F. Horner, '91 ; Vice- 
pres., W. A. Brown, '91 ; sec, L. M. 
Barker, '94: treas., H. D. Clark, '93; 1st 
director, H. M. Howard, '91 ; 2d director, 
E. T. Clark, '92 : 3d director, F. S. Hoyt, 
'93. 



PRAYER MEETING TOPICS. 

Jan. 15. — Our Common Warfare. Phil. 1 : 

27-30. H. E. Crane. 
Jan. 18. — Living Honestly. Rom. 13: 7- 

14. H. G. Stockwell. 
Jan. 22. — God's Care for the Righteous. 
Job 36:7; Ps. 34 : 15 ; I Pet. 
3 : 12. E. P. Felt. 
Jan. 25. — Aflflictious Essential to our Wel- 
fare. Sam. 3 : 22-41 ; Heb. 
12: 11. II. M. Howard. 
W. I. L. S. officers for the term are : 
E. P. Felt, '91, Pres., 
H. M. Thomson, '92, Vice-Pres., 

E. A. Hawkes, 'y3, Sec, 

F. S. Hoyt, '93, Treas., 

W. A. Brown, '91, 1st Director, 
H. B. Emerson, '92, 2nd " 
F. H. Hendersou, '93, 3rd " 



54 



AGGIE LIFE. 



C. H. S4NDERS0Ii^& CO., 



CASH DEALERS IN 



HATS, Caps, Umbrellas, and IGents' 
Furnishing Goods. 



CASH ROW, 



AMHERST. 



S/lNDEfgO^ k ThOMPSOI^, 

CASH^DEALEBS IN 

Dry! and Fancy Goods, 



HOSIERY, RIBBONS, AND SMALL 
WARES OF ALL KINDS. 



AMHERST, MASS. 



BOOTS#SHOES 

FOR EVERYBODY. 

A FINE LINE OF 3TODENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, 
BALS. AND CONGRESS, 

A FULL LINE OF 

HXJBBEE, C3-OOI3S, 

POOT-BALL SHOES AT I>OWEST CASH PEICES. 

Repairing Done Promptly. 
T, W. SLOAN, 

g rSCCENlX ROW. 



S. J, SULLIVAN, 



DEALER INlj 



Second-Hand|Clothes 

ANDl 

FURinTURE. 

((^Orders promptly attended to.„^ 
1'. O. Box, 319 AMHERST, MASS. 



Last Monday eveuiug the Natural His- 
tory Society listened to some interesting 
papers on tlie winter liabits of animals as 
follows: E. P. Felt on insects, H. M. 
Thomson on reptiles and J. Baker on spi- 
ders. 

At a meeting of the class of '93 held 
Dec. 11th the following officers were elect- 
ed for the ensuing term : Pres't, F. H. 
Henderson; vice-pres't, A. E. Melendy ; 
sec. and treas., ¥. A. Smith; class capt., 
E. H. Lehuert ; polo capt., J. R. Perry; 
base-ball capt., G. F. Curley. 

The editors of the Index wish to express 
their regret that they have not been able to 
present the book to the public until this 
late date, but owing to the negligence of 
the engravers and binders we have not 
been able to do so. We sincerely hope 
that, after veaitiug so long, you will not 
have an added disappointment in the book 
itself.— The Editors. 

Tuesday, Jan. 6, there were no recita- 
tions after 11.30 in order to allow the stu- 
dents to go to Florence. A large delegation 
from '94 and the C. 8. C. attended the 
funeral of Henry B. Learned. The service 
was very impressive. The hall was crowd- 
ed and many were obliged to stand outside. 
At the invitation of Mr. Learned a number 
of the students visited the home of their 
former college mate, before returning. 

The class of '92 held their term election 
Monday morning. The following were 
the oflScers chosen: H. M. Thomson, 
Pres. ; W. I. Boynton, Vice-Pres. ; F. G. 
Stockbridge, Sec. ; E. B. Holland, Treas. ; 
G. B. Willard, Captain. F. H. Plumb 
tendered his resignatiou as Historian, 
which was accepted. Geo. E. Taylor was 
elected in his place. It was voted to hold 
an auction, Jan. 21, for the sale of the 
plates used for the Index., to members of 
the class. 

Lieut. Cornish proposes to have a compe- 
titive drill between the companies, for the 
honor of color company, and also au indi- 
vidual prize drill for the $20.00 gold medal 
presented by Father Drennan of Amherst. 
This drill will probably take place the 
last of Feb. in the new town hall ; the pro- 
ceeds to be devoted to the coming field day 
in the spring, if enough enthusiasm is 
aroused to make it an object. In the menn- 
time there is a chance for honest work for 
all of these pi'izes. Every student should 
take daily exercise, and also save up his 
money, by slaying in nights, in order to 
subscribe liberally when ihe subscription 
paper comes around, which will be soon. 





Business l? l)u>;me=:s ^RA^'K WOOD will get up 
Spread', f 01 the Bo^ s tins nintui Send jour orders 
right along ro get tnere rirsr. 



Do you want a nice warm Ulster? 

A Toboggan Tuque to wear skat- 
ing or sleighing? 

If so call on us. 

We have some dandy Black 
Cheviot Suits. We have a big 
trade at your college and use the 
boys right. 



.JOHN MULLEN, 



-DEALER IN- 



MEATS and PROVISIONS, 

VEGETABLES OF ALL KINDS IN SEASON, 

FISH AND OYSTERS, FOREIGN 

AND DOMESTIC FRUITS, 

AND CANNED 

GOODS. 

Palmer's Block, Main Street. 



E. R. BENNETT, 
Jeweler, 

Optician, 

Watchmaker. 

FINE GOODS! LOW PRICES! 

GOOD WORK WARRANTED. 

First Door from Post Office. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



55 



IF YOU WANT TO GET OYSTERS IN ANY 
STYLE GO TO 

E. B. ARNOLD'S 

OYmm KftPE, 

students are attended at short notice, 



Opeu all days of the week until 12 o'clock. 
Sundays from 9 a. m. to 12-30 p. m., and from 
7 P. M. to 11 p. M. 

William's Block, Merchants' Row. 



The title page of this book was di-avTU and engraved by 



John 5"^^^^^$ 



? 



6 Davis Street, 



BOSTON, MASS. 



The various publications of Bates, Bowdoin, Colby, 
Tuft,~, Mass. Agricultural College, Wellesly and Yale 
have used his work. He will submit sketches and cari- 
catures for your approval. 



OFFICE OF 



EDWARD A. THOMAS, 

FlI}E/fiD Life IpRANCE /GEtiJ. 

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE AND TO LET. 



Office, Cooks Block, A.niherst, Mass, 



GEO. GRAVES, 



DEALER IN 



Painters' Supplies 

Personal attention given to Frescoing, Dec- 
orating and Paper Hanging, and all 
Interior and Exterior 
House Painting. 

Pleasant St., near L J. Spear's Shop. 



AMHERST COLLEGE 

Cfl-OP[RATIVE 8T[i LAUNDRY 

and Carpet Renovavin^ Establisliment. 



Aggie Agent, H. M. HOWARD, '91. 

"Work taken Monday delivered Wednesday. 
" " Wednesday delivered Saturday. 

SA.TISF.A-CTIOISr Ca-XJA.E.-.^KT'XBBia, 

OFFICE AT BRINE'S. 

H. A. UTLEY, Manager. 



MAILS. 

Mail leaves college for P. 0. at 1 p. m. 
and 7 p. m. on week days. On Sunday it 
leaves at 4-45 p. m. At the P. O. mails 
close as follows : 

Boston, 

7-46, 8-30, 10-15 a.m. ; 4-00, 6-45, 7-45 p.m. 

Neiv York, Western and Southern States, 

7-45, 10-15 A. M. ; 4-00, 6-45, 7-45 p. m. 

Northampton, Springfield and Western 

Massadiuseits, 

7-20, 10-15, 10-45 A. M. ; 6-45 p. m. 

Northern way, N. L. Northern, 

8-30 A. M. 

The treasurer will be at his office frOm 4 

to 5 p. M. on Saturday's throughout the 

term. 

The museum of natural histoi'y will be 
open to visitors from 1-30 to 4-30 each af- 
ternoon excepting Saturday and Sunday. 

The college library will be open from 2 
to 4 p. M. and frotn 7 to 8 p. m. each day, 
excepting Saturday and Sunday. On Sat- 
urday it will be open from 9 to 12 a. m. and 
from 2 to 4 p. M., and on Sunday from 2 
to 3 p. M. 

President Goodell will be at his office 
from 2 to 4 p. m. every afternoon except 
Saturday and Sunday. 



WAS IT A DREAM? 

One night while writing I fell asleep, 
and upon awakening I read the following, 
which I can only account for on the suppo- 
sition that it was written while dreaming. 
In 1930 I purchased a ticket in Boston for 
Amherst. Leaving Boston at 7.15a.m. on the 
Central Mass. R. R., I arrived in Amherst 
at8 A. M., travelling a trifle over two miles 
per minute, including stops. The road 
was nearly' straight, the cars slid along 
noiselessly, and I saw there were foui' 
tracks all the way. Upon arriving at Am- 
herst I took an electric car for the Agricul- 
tural College, which was almost surrounded 
by the populous city of Amherst, and ar- 
rived on the college grounds in time to 
attend chapel exercises. 

The huge electric chime of bells was 
ringing as I alighted at the chapel door 
and I observed 1500 young men file quickly 
into their places in the commodious chapel 
hall. Soon the service was over and the 
students i)roi;eeded to their class rooms, 
each man with a phonograph in his pocket 
to receive the lecture. 

After a few minutes conversation with 
the pastor, he showed me around, first call- 



ing my attention to the singing organ, 
which not only sounded tlie notes but the 
words also. Next we stepped outside ; in 
front of us lay a small campus, beyond, on 
the flat below, we saw the athletic fields 
and near them a large drill hall. Farther 
to the south we noticed the college barn on 
the Hadley rond. On our right was the 
College Library, a nice stone building, 
which formerly served as a chapel and 
library combined, but was remodeled years 
ago to serve as a library. 

On our left Zoological Hall attracted 
our attention. This building is a large 
stone structure, which conlains someof the 
finest zoological collections in the country. 
It has been much improved by a Natural 
History Society, that tlie students have sup- 
ported for the last forty years. The 
ground floor is occupied by a number of 
class rooms where specialists give instruc- 
tion in the many subdivisions of zoology. 

On the opposite side of the avenue we 
saw the Agricultural hall, which equaled 
Zoological hall, and contained a very large 
collection of agricultural implements both 
ancient and modern. The various electric 
motors were exhibited, showing their 
adaptability to all kinds of work. Here as 
in zoology each professor instructs in a 
special branch of agriculture. 

Beyond Zoological Hall, on the same 
side of the avenue, there is a large six story 
building and several smaller ones behind 
it. The large building is the Mechanical 
and Electrical Hall ; let us enter. On the 
ground floor we see a number of class 
rooms, one being devoted to instruction in 
light, another heat, another electricity, 
etc., one room to each subdivision of 
Physics. On the second floor are numer- 
ous rooms for the purpose of piactical ex- 
periments by the students; the' remainder 
of the building is devoted to the large 
museum. 

Nest we proceed in a northerly diiection 
past ihe Chapel and Liorary, and on the 
opposite side of the avenue. Medical Hall 
attracts our notice. Here we observe stu- 
dents ill one room listening to a lecture, 
while their phonographs record it ; in 
another room students are experimenting, 
and in several other rooms they are 
dissecting. The upper stories of the build- 
ing contain a museum of anatomical models 
and ingenious medical appliances. 

North of the Medical hall is a large 
chemical laboiatory and museum combined. 
This building has not lieen named as yet, 
but it has several large rooms, each with a 
specialist who instructs only in his branch 



56 



AGGIE LIFE. 



of cliemisti-y. Abo^e the lecture rooms is 
a large collection of minerals, all nicely 
.arranged, labeled, and catalogued. 

Opposite the chemical laboratory there 
is a large building wheie instruction in the 
social science is given by a competent corps 
of professors. 

Following the winding path across the 
valley, past the lake, we come to the 
Botanic Museum and the gi'eeu-houses. 
The Museum contains a number of large 
lecture rooms and a nice roomy laboratory 
on the ground floor. In the museum, in the 
upper stories, there is a fine collection of 
woods, models of fruits, and plants. The 
surrounding grounds and the green-houses 
contain living specimens of almost all 
known plants. As we return by the shady 
walk to the college proper, we can but 
admire the avenues completely arched over 
by fine trees that are still in their prime. 

The drill hall and the parade ground 
near the athletic field afford ample room 
for drill. On the plains below we noticed 
a body of cavalry manoeuvring. The barn 
near by allows the student to become fanail- 
iar with the practical details of farming. 
The farm keeps up with the times and 
uses only the best and most improved 
machines. 

The students take an active interest in 
athletics, they take plenty of exercise and 
are not afraid of work. 

They room either in club houses or in 
private homes ; there are no dormitories. 
Those that room in the city ride back and 
forth on the electric cars. 

Writing has passed out of date with the 
advent of the phonograph, which not only 
records, but repeats at pleasure. The stu- 
dents maintain several debating, social and 
secret societies. A paper that was started 
forty years ago, as a bi-weekly, has now 
become an eight page daily with a circula- 
tion of 10,000. 

The college buildings are all heated and 
lighted by electricity, the electric engine is 
located in a small building in the rear of 
Mechanical Hall. 

The course after the first year is optional, 
the student graduates in from four to six 
years, and the graduates are always in 
demand. 

The students came from all classes of 
society ; the majority are farmers' sons. 
Since 1906 most of the students return to 
farming, thus giving us a rural population 
of a very high average intelligence. 

E. P. F. 



B, B, DieKII]gOI], D. I). S, 

^•DEI]TftL !{OOIIJS,-^ 



KELLOGG'S BLOCK, 



AMHERST, ILASS. 



Office Hours, 9 to 12 a. m., l-dO to .5 p. M. 



*®"Ether and Nitrous Oxide Gas administered wtien 
desired. 



A-T THE 



j^MHEBST CASH SHOE STORE, 

You can get tlie most for your money. 
BOOTS AND SHOES, RUBBERS, OVER- 
SHOES, SLIPPERS, TRUNKS, 
AND BAGS. 



REPAIRING NEATLY DONE. 



HAWES & STINSON, 

CASH KOW, AMHERST, MASS. 



AMHERST HOUSE 



LIVERY, FEED JND SALE STABLE. 



T. L. PAIGE, Prop'r. 



HACKS TO AND FROM ALL TRAINS, OM- 
NIBUSES, HACKS, DOUBLE AND 
SINGLE TEAMS FURNISHED 
AT SHORT NOTICE. 
CAREFUL DRIVERS. FAIR PRICES. 

A-MHEBSr, MASS. 



A. X. PETIT, 

TEACHER OF DANCING. 

Evening Class every Tuesday evening. Private lessons 
wlien desired. Hall in Dickinson's Blocic (over Lee & 
Pliillips'). P. O. address, Amlierst, Mass. 



Mass. Agijicultural College, , 

Botanical Department, 

AMHERST, MASS. 

We would inform the friends of the college, 
and the public generally, that we ai'e prepared ' 
to supply 

FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND 

SHRUBS, SMALL FRUITS AND 

PLANTS, 

true to name, also 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

all at the lowest price. 

For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and Small 

Fruits, address, 

■ Prof. S. T. Maynard, 

AMHERST, MASS 



THE AMHERST 



FURNITURE /ND CARPET STORE. 



A complete line of goods suited to the students' 
wants. 

BEDSTEADS, MATTRESSES, PILLOWS, 



STUDY DESKS AND CHAIRS, 
LOUNGES 



WINDOW SHADES, DRAPERIES, 

CARPETS, RUGS, ETC., ETC. 



All goods Strictly Cash and at Jjowest I*Tices, 



E. D. MAK8H, 

10 PHCENIX ROW, - - AMHERST, MASS- 



Sheet Music. 



F^OWBS ^ PxBLIiOGG, 



UEALMUS IN 



Mvi^iG Book:s,|^-STUDEP'S SUPPLIES-^ 



String'r^ 

FOR THE VIULIN'. BAN.IO. GUITAR, 



I-"ANCY GROCERIES. CROCKEUY. CIGARS, 

CIGARETTES, T(IBACC(J. FRUITS 

AND CONFECTIONERY, 



Aishman's Music Store, :i^ftniP800DSftiiDKEi^oxBiiBoiL 



^!VI>/IE3 EITIST. 



J, M, WAITE &. SON, 



SOoors South of /•>. O., - AjWHEKST, MASS. 



EDWIN NELSON. 

r^gi Books and Stationery, 



fi.O, P 



H 



H 



IQercM TailOF, 



AND DKALKKS IN 



Hats, Caps, Furs, Trunks, Bags, Furiiisliiug Goods, 



Nc'xt door to Post Oflice, 
AMHERST, MASS. 



WOOD'S HOUSE 



Latest (Styles in Funiishiugs. Agent for 

Knox's and Youmau's Hats. Sole ; 

Agent for PittsfieM ikftlJ^ DKESSII^(Zl E001T]S, 

Lanndrv. I 

! Razors Honed and Shears Sharpened at 

H.\Ts Repaired. Furs Renovated .. short notice. 

Give us a uall liel'orc purcliashig. j "PEI^ID -pr* ^ "tNT"F.TT"F 

NO. H I'HmNIX now, .-LMHEIIST, DIASS.] .„u,j„cn, .lAoc 

I . AMHElisT, MASS. 



A 3vcig:Ei?,ST, 



IvI-A.£3S. 



^mberst Mouse, 



AMHERST, JFASS. 



r. H. KENFTELD. 



Wooil'.t Ttlork. 



Amherst, Mass. 



The nndersigned is pleased to announce 
to his former patrons and others desiring 
Game Spreads or Dinners, that he is always 
prepared to accomodate (at short notice 
hirge or small parties. 

Amph' dining room capacity for 200 peo- 
ple. 

LORENZO CHASE, PrOP'R. 



SPECIAL. 



el. fl. l^AWSON, 



DE.4LK1! IN 



A stom Wind Miiil Set WaitlKim, H.-impcleii. KIgiii or II 
liiioift movonienl in :i (iolii Filled <_':ise for sir,. (1(1. 



Uiiibi-elliis covered «lnle yon wait, also dealer 
ill Guns. Rifles, Aiiimunitioii and Sporting ("Jood,s ! 
I of all kinds. Aniatcnr Rliotosrapliic Outfits and 
I Supplies. Views and Pictures taken \vli;'ii de- 
sired. A'icws of Anilierst and Vicinity for sale. 
Call and see before pnrchasinn' elsewhere. 



Mmmm. (i<w(lk% jeweli^y 

FINE POCKET CUTLERY, SILVER ANB 

PLATED WARE, OPTICAL GOODS 

CANES, SPORTING AND 

FANCY' GOODS, 

Gold Pens, Fine Stationery 



REPARING NEATLY and PROMPTLY DONE. 



«S=-WATCH AND CLOCK REPAIRING A SPECIALTY. -Jar 



I- 



AMHERST, MASS. 



C. S. GATES, D. U. S. 
T. G. HUNTINGTON, D. D. S. 

CU'l'l,ER>S BLOCK, AMHERST, MASH. 



OFFICE HOURS: 
9 A.. Is/L. TO S £=. ]Vi:. 

Etiier and Nitrons O.xide administered wlieii 
desired. 



J. L. LOVELL, 

-^PHOTOSRftPHEfl,^ 

DRY PLATES, COMPOUND DEVELOPER 

AND SENSITIZED PAPER. READY 

F(.)H USE. 



DWIG'HTl CQOOl^B, 



BILLIARD AND POOL 



I=.A.I^J_jOPt, 



PRINTING FOR AMATEURS 

Done in the best manner. 



3 ffufiiLf ito'* ( Vp-stiiirs ), 
AMHERST, MASS, 



IMUERST, MASS. 



assachusetts Agricultural College, 




iVirxxlxe^r*?^!, ]Mo^:s«». 



9» 




VOL. I. 



AMHERST, MASS., JANUARY 28, 1891. 



NO. 8. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



VOL. 



AMHERST, MASS., JANUARY 28, 1891. 



No. 8 



WHERE DO YOU BUY YOUI| 

Meerschaum Pipes? 
French Briar Pipes? 
Choice Tobacco? 
Sponges? 
Soap? 

Hair Bruslies from 25 cts. up? 
Combs from 5 cts. up? 
Choice New Yorlv Confectionery? 
Shaving Mugs? 
Shaving Soap? 
Lather Bruslies? 

Cigarettes, fresh every two weel\s? 
The Best Soda in America? 
The Best Bay Rum? 
Imported Perfumes? 
Prescriptions prepared by licensed pharmacists? 
Imported Domestic Tooth Brushes? 

If you have not obtained these necessaries at 
DEUEL'S DRUG STORE, you liave begun 
wrong. Deuel's is the leading Drug Store in 
Western Mass., and keeps tlie largest assort- 
ment of goods at bottom prices. 



DEUEL'S DRU& STORE, 

Amherst House Block, Amherst, lass. 
HENRY ADAMS, 



PHARMACIST, 



NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Pure Driiffs and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORT- 
ED AND DOMESTIC CIGARS, 
CIGARETTES, ETC., 
MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, 
FISHING TACKLE AND SPORTING GOODS, 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, and Sporting 
and Springfield Rifles. 

Sunday and night calls responded to at resi- 
dence, first door west of Wood's Hotel. 

^rugs, Medicines, 

TOILET ARTICLES, 

CONFECTIONERY, CIGARS, CIGARETTES 

AND SMOKERS' GOODS. 



VHYSICIAKS' PnMSCRZPTIOlfS CABE- 
FULZT COMFOVNDJED, 

AT 

6 PHCENIX ROW. 

Order your CO^'Sa here. 



COMMUNICATION. 

3fessrs. Editors : — The writer is glad to 
see tliat the students of his ixbnu mater 
liave at hist fouud the circumstances favor- 
able to the pubHcation of a college paper, 
and he cougratulates the Board of Editors 
ou the success they have thus far made of 
Aggie Life. He earnestly hopes that the 
alumni will cordially support this enter- 
prise, by seeing that their names are 
promptly entered on the subscription list. 

Many of the readers of this paper, busied 
in getting an education, may, perhaps, find 
a few words relating to the Gej'man Uni- 
versity of some interest to them. 

In the first place, the University system 
is entirely different from that of the aver- 
age American College. The Johns Hop- 
kins University in Baltimore, and Clark's 
University in Worcester, are the only two 
institutions in America, founded after the 
pattern of the German institution, and as 
yet, they are only partially organized. The 
Universities here have no classes, no grad- 
uation, and the authorities have absolutely 
no control over the doings of the students, 
provided they in no wise disturb the peace 
of the (community. No man is kept back 
because of another's dullness, or advanced 
by clinging to the coat-tails of brighter or 
more industrious fellow-students. He is 
left entirely free to work out his own edu- 
cation. No dormitories or the like are 
provided, the university buildings being 
used exclusively for lecture rooms, labora- 
tories, and for tiie preservation of col- 
lections. The different universities are 
controlled by, and derive their financial 
support from the German govei'nment. The 
university here at Gottiugen, founded in 
1737, has at present nearly 1000 students. 
Among the other noted universities of 
which Germany can boast, some of tbem 
containing four or five times as many stu- 
dents, may be mentioned those at Jjerlin, 
Leipsiz, Bonn, Munich, Halle, Strassburg 
and Heidelberg. The corps of instructors 
are divided into faculties, as for example, 
the philosophical, legal, theological, etc. 
The university year is divided into two 
terms, or Semesters, as they are called. 
The Winter one begins about October 15, 
and ends March 16, while the Summer 
Semester opens, nominallj-, April 15, and 
closes August 15. These Semesters are 



quite a little shortened, from the fact that 
the Professors do not begin their lectures 
till from ten days to two weeks after the 
dates above stated, and close generally a 
week earlier. 

Perhaps the reader will get a better idea 
of the system, if we endeavor to follow the 
course of a student, as he starts npon a 
course of study at the Gottingen Univers- 
ity. The first indications the student will 
have of the beginning of the Semester, will 
be a notice, published in one of the uni- 
versity building's, stating that ou such and 
such days' students may matriculate at such 
an hour for the coming Semester. The 
student presents himself at the appointed 
time at the Immatriculation Salle, and 
from this he goes to a smaller room, where 
sit the Secretary and his assistants. Here 
he answers any questions that may be ask- 
ed him, fills out a blank, giving concisely 
his history to date, and after paying 18 
marks as the price of matriculation, and 
contributing to the poor, by depositing 
what he will in the box placed before him, 
he retires, with the understanding that he 
is to come again a day or two hence at a 
certain hour. A deep voiced American, 
whose Ivuowledge of the language appeared 
to consist only of the words ya and nein, 
being about to matriculate, was asked 
what his name was? "la," he replied, in 
his deep voice. The question was repeated 
with like results. The clerk thought he 
would try him in another direction, and 
asked, " Wo suid Sie zu Haiise?" meaning, 
where is your home? "Ya, Ta," was the 
reply in still deeper and louder tone, and 
the clerk gave up the etfort, and called for 
help. All those who, on the same day 
have completed this part of the matricula- 
tion, come together again on the day or 
two following, and are met by the Pro Rec- 
tor, who corresponds in a measure to the 
President of an American College. He 
delivers a short address, saying in sub- 
stance that the students are expected at all 
times to obey the laws of the university, 
and at its conclusion, calls the names of 
each man separately, shakes him by the 
hand, welcoming him to fellowship in the 
university, and presents him with his cer- 
tificate of membersliip and several neces- 
sary papers. Shortly after the matricula- 
tion is completed, the student will begin to 



>58 



AGGIE LIFE. 



see notices posted on the bulletin boards, 
stating when, and on what subjects the 
Professors will begin to lecture, and when 
the different laboratories will open for work. 

A book is provided each student, in 
which he enters the lectures he will attend. 
This book the student takes to the Trea- 
surer within four weeks after the opening, 
and the latter enters the cost of each course 
of lectures in its proper place. The price 
is anywhere from 5 marks to 40 marks per 
course, each Semester, depending on the 
number of times the professor reads each 
week. The student having paid, presents 
this book to the professor, who signs it, 
certifying that the student is in attendance 
at the opening of tiie course. This book 
the professor also signs a few days before 
he closes his lectures, liis signature having 
a similar signification. The total cost of 
instruction per year varies greatly. If a 
student has much laboratory work, he will 
probably pay about one hundred dollars, 
while if little or no such work is done, one 
half of the above sum will be nearer the 
necessary amount. The reader will thus 
see that one is left entirely to his own 
pleasure as to what he will study. He can 
select any subjects he likes, and pursue 
them as long as he desires. 

One need not attend lectures at all regu- 
larly if he has not the inclination, and if 
the number of students is large, the pro- 
fessor will scarcely notice his absence. A 
good story was once told me by a friend. 
A student wished to have his book show 
that he had attended a certain course of 
lectures given by Prof. X. He heard one 
lecture at the beginning of the course, and 
the Professor signed his book. Shortly be- 
fore the close of the course, wishing to have 
his book again signed, he went to the Pro- 
fessor's office for that purpose. Not hav- 
ing seen the gentleman but once, he had for- 
gotten just how he looked, but forgetful of 
the fact, he entered and inquired if Prof. 
X. was iu. Upon being asked what he 
wished, he explained the object of his visit. 
Imagine the consternation of our student, 
when the Professor, after looking at him 
critically for a moment, quietly informed 
him that he was Prof. X. and he regretted 
very much that he could not favor him 
with his signature. 

Many German students spend a Semester 
or perhaps two, at quite a number of dif- 
ferent universities, and thus have the 
privilege of hearing and learning the meth- 
ods of work, of many of the ablest educa- 
tors. 

The degree given by a German univer- 



sity is that of Doctor of Philosophy. Con- 
sidering the number of students who at- 
tend, very few take a degree. In Gottin- 
gen, should a man wish to obtain the de- 
gree, he must have spent at least 3 Semes- 
ters at that institution and prepare himself 
for examination in 3 studies. In his ma- 
jor study, or Hauptfach as it is called, he 
must present an original investigation or 
Arbeit, which meets the approval of the 
professor. In his minor studies or Nehen- 
facher no Arbeit is required, but the pro- 
fessor will outline what is required in each 
of the studies. After the Arbeit is com- 
pleted, and the student considers himself 
ready to be proved, he hands it together 
with his application for an examination, tlie 
latter written in Latin, to the Dean of the 
faculty, who appoints a certain day. The 
examinations are held from 6 till 8 in the 
evening, and are conducted by the three 
professors with whom he has especially 
studied, and the board of the examiners 
appointed by the university. The day be- 
fore the examination, the student accord- 
ing to custom, in full evening dress, is 
driven to the houses of the different mem- 
bers of the examining board, and sends in 
his card. Quite often he is invited in, 
while at other times he is informed that the 
gentleman is very sorry, but he is at pres- 
ent engaged. An American who made his 
examination but a short time ago, on mak- 
ing this formal visit, was received by one 
of the examiners with whom he was not 
at all acquainted. After chatting for a 
few minutes, the Prof, said, "Yes, Mein 
Herr, you look so very tine, it will be a 
great pleasure for me to assist in examin- 
ing you this evening.'' The cost of an ex- 
amination is about $100, and if the student 
fails, he gets back but a small part of it. 
If he is successful, before he can received 
his degree, he must have hxs, Arbeit printed 
and present the University Library with 
300 copies. Perhaps in the future I may 
have a few words to say about the Ger- 
man professor, and the advantage of Ger- 
man methods of instruction. 

J. B. LiNDSEY. 

Gottingen, Dec, 1890. 



A FRESHMAN'S STORY, 

['m a merry little rresliman, ^ 

Scarce five feet two in heiglit. 
I'm a model of perfection. 

I always do what's right. 
My papa sent me here one day 

To make me good and true. 
Said he, "The college atmosphere 

I'm sure will do for you. 
It will make you strong and healthy, 



Give vigor to your brain. 
You'll be almost a man, my son. 

When you come home again." 
And so, you see, I came here, friends. 

And so I'm here to-day. 
And so I've got to stay here, friends. 

That's what my parents say. 
'Twas a day in last September, 

On Wednesday, I believe, 
When I set about my duties, 

Book learning to achieve. 
I was shown a horde of classmates. 

Some flfty-flve or more. 
From country farms, a host of them, 

And verdant to the core. 
I had a room in North College, 

Ahove two flights of stairs. 
And there my chum and I did strive 

To mind our own affairs, 
But oh, alas ! The Sophomores, 

The class above, you know. 
They stacked our room and stole our books, 

'Twas mean to plague us so ! 
And yet we've never had to turn 

From duty's narrow path. 
We've studied hard on Hydrogen, 

The valence Chlorine liath, 
We've learned the properties of x, 

Equations, and all that. 
We've read a Latin grammar — -some 

Amo, Amas, Amat, 
We ve said it o'er, and o'er, and o'er. 

And yet we know it not. 
We're always called upon to say 

Just what we haven't got. 
But though these obstacles we'll meet. 

We'll "get there just the same," 
We're never known as "verdant" now. 

We've won a better name. 
This college is a funny place. 

With funny students, too 
A funny lot of ways they have. 

And funny things they do. 
At first we went to bed at eight. 

Until the "Owls" came round. 
Since then we've thought it best to wait 

For later hours to sound. 
We go to chapel Sunday morn 

And hear a sermon long. 
We hasten to the boarding iouse 

At sound of bell and gong. 
And though you think us "young and fresh" 

In numbers we surpass, 
Just give us time, and you shall see 

The merit of our class. 
I'm a merry little Freshman, 

Scarce five feet two in height, 
I'm a model of perfection, 

I always do what's right. 
I'm free from all conditions now, 

A "crib" I do despise, 
I never cut a drill hour now. 

Or wickedness devise. 
I black my shoes three times a day. 

For I'm a tidy lad. 
I never, never, go to Hamp. 

For mama says it's bad. 
And so you see I'm still here, friends. 

Because I came to stay. 
I don't intend to leave here, friends, 

Unless I'm sent away. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



59 



QJ . 





COLLEGE TAILOR, 



Successor to F. H. Budding & Co,, Amiierst Tailors 



Fall aid Winter Suitii, 



10 



ORDERS TAKEN FOR SUITS AND 

OVERCOATS, FULL DRESS 

, SUITS TO ORDER, 



GENTS' FURNISHING DEPARTMENT, 
COLLARS, CUFFS and TIES, ■ 
SUSPENDERS >ND UNDERWEAR. 

Foot-Ball and Gpoasium Goods. 



J. B. bri:n^e 



lerchants' Row, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



OUR COLLEGE PUBLICATIONS. 

No college would be complete without 
some sort of a publication, something in 
which the students could express their 
views on matters of practical interest to the 
college, as well as ply their wit at the ex- 
pense of their college mates. A feeling of 
such a need very early possesssd the stu- 
dents at Aggie, for hardly had she been 
founded and the first class entered and 
established when a small pamphlet entitled 
Grand Menagerie at the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College vi as issued. This con- 
sisted solely of a " grind " upon every stu- 
dent in college, comprising none of the 
more sedate matters characteristic of the 
publications of the present day. It was 
published in 1869, and this was the only 
volume issued. 

Very soon afterwards, indeed the same 
year, the first copy of the Index appeared, 
and this has been sent out every year since 
by the Junior class. Each class vies with 
every preceding one in the effort to produce 
a better Index than any which has gone be- 
fore, and so it has improved from year to 
year until the one recently issued, which 
(so the Juniors say) is the best of all. 
The earlier volumes were much smaller 
than the later ones, and contained little but 
class communications, compilations of offi- 
cers, and the like. Now an IndiX would 
be considered no Index at all if it did not 
have a good many cuts as well as grinds 
upon the Faculty and students. Formerly 
it has appeared in a paper cover, but this 
year it was bound, thus adding both to its 
beauty and durability. 

In the summer of 1879 the first volume 
of the Cycle was presented to the public by 
the D. G. K. society. This has been 
issued every Commencement since, and, 
although it ordmarily contains much of 
general interest, it is devoted more partic- 
ularly to the interests of the fraternity. It 
is issued the Monday before Commence- 
ment, but a supplement is issued Com- 
mencement day giving the events of the 
week. 

Last, but not least, in our enumeration 
comes Aggie Life. There is, perhaps, 
not much in the past to boast about, as it 
is less than four months since it was given 
birth ; it is also too early to prophesy of 
its future. And yet it has come to stay. 
The reception given it by the students 
shows that it was needed. The Index and 
the Cycle serve the purpose of reviewing 
the most important events during the past 
year, and suggesting some improvements 



for the future, but a desire was felt for a 
paper issued oftener, giving more in detail 
the history of the college ; this desire Aggie 
Life endeavors to satisfy. At first some 
fears were expressed lest it should under- 
mine the Index or the Cycle, so that they 
would not be issued. But this siiould not 
be so. We have none too many publica- 
tions, but let us devote our first interest to 
our college and then to our class and society 
publications. J. L. F. 



THE INDEX. 



The first thing to strike the reader of 
this volume of the Index is its late appear- 
ance, but this we understand is not the 
fault of the Editors, as they got their copy 
to press, they say, as soon as possible. 
It is increased in size over former years, 
both in size of pages and number of them. 
The introduction of cloth binding is a step 
taken in the line of improvement. 

'92's board of Eds. have kept up all the 
essential features of former years and 
originated some of their own. Those re- 
tained have been elaborated and improved. 
One innovation is in the manner of chron- 
icling the important events of the year. 
The happenings of each month are grouped 
together on a separate page and with a 
fitting cut for each month. We had almost 
forgotten to state that this edition has no 
frontispiece. We do not know why this is. 
Perhaps it was an oversight, perhaps the 
Editors thought the frontispiece plaved 
out. 

The book contains an unusually large 
number of cuts and poems, the former of 
which show the artist to have been an apt 
student of nature. 

The photogravures of the college teams 
are at once an innovation and an improve- 
ment. The poems and grinds we leave to 
the judgment of our college mates. The 
Editors seem to have been determined that 
the Faculty should not feel slighted, and 
have ground them faithfully. 

We notice in looking over the pages a 
new Aggie Alumni Club, that of the West- 
ern states, and — alas, a memorial page 
devoted to the memory of a dead college 
mate. 

Tlie work contains about the average 
number of mistakes and misstatements, 
but these, perhaps, are unavoidable. We 
would counsel '93, however, to make pre- 
vious arrangements with engraver and 
printer, by which they may depend on get- 
ting their Index out before Christmas. 



6o 



AGGIE LIFE. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Published Fortnightly by the Students of the 
Mass. Agricultural College. 



Terms $1,00 per year, in advance. 



Single copies, 10c. 



Entered at the Post OlBce as second-class mail matter. 



BOARD OJF MJilTOItS : 

E. P. FELT, Editor-in-Chief, 
O. V. B. LAGE, Bu.iiness Manager, 
A. G. EAMES, '91, H. N. LEGATE, '91, 

J. li. FIELD, 'i)2, G. E. TAYLOR, '92, 

G. F. CURLET, '9:5. 



Address all communications to the Business Manager. 



In this niimbei' we publish the new 
rules and regulations governing the admis- 
sion and standing of the students. By 
these new rules the standard is raised to 
65fc- 'i'his is a step in the right direc- 
tion. There is an old saying, that "what- 
ever is worth doing at all, is worth doing 
well"; this applies with especial force to 
our college course. With the new stand- 
ard more thorough work must be done b}' 
the few who tend to lag, while the others 
will be encouraged and stand even higher. 
To obtain the best results it might be best 
to reduce the number of studies, because 
as it is now, some men may be crowded 
rather too hard ; as, for example, last term 
was very hard on one class at least, and for 
the benefit of those who come after, we 
hope no other class will suffer from a simi- 
lar overdose of learning. 



It is with pleasure that we publish a 
letter from J. B. Lindsey, '83, now at 
Gottingen University, Germany. We wish 
that more of our alumni would follow 
his example and give us some interesting 
letters in regard to their surroundings, 
business, etc. The alumni should remem- 
ber that here are over a bundled men, who 
will shortly go out into the world, some of 
whom may follow in the footsteps of other 
graduates. To such men as these, letters 
giving short sketches of the conditions and 
business opportunities surrounding our pre- 
decessors, in their various locations, would 
be very acceptable. In such letters many 
interesting facts may be brought out thai 
cannot be obtained in any other way, and 
they are not only interesting to the students 
but many of the alumni must also be inter- 
ested in the fortunes of their college mates. 



Sometimes we hear a man say "I shall 
not be around, to the meeting to-night, as 1 
have an appointment to speak and cannot 
find anything on the subject." And our 
friend passes on, feeling that it is perfectly 



right to evade an appointment, simply be- 
cause the condensed facts are not in his 
hands. Is this the proper position for a 
College man to take — a man who has ac- 
cess to several good libraries? Can such a 
man honestly claim, that there are no facts 
within easy reach, relating to the subject 
assigned to him? Again, is it the part of 
a gentleman to sneak out of an appoint- 
ment simply because he is too busy, or has 
too little interest in the matter? If it is 
impossible to attend, it is much better to 
provide a substitute. If it is lack of inter- 
est, the question might well be put, why 
did you allow yourself to become connected 
with any such organization ? Let every 
man do his duty ; dead-heads are of no ac- 
count in auj' position. 



The principal resort of the idler is in an- 
other man's room. He knocks at his 
neighbor's door and, in many cases, out of 
charity is told to come in, with which re- 
quest he invariably complies. He doesn't 
seem to have any special business to trans- 
act, but having tired of lounging in his own 
room, he decides that he will just run over 
and see his friend Bradford a few moments. 
This gererall}' results in a more or less 
waste of time for both men, and if Mr. 
Bradford happens to be one who values his 
minutes, he will sadly feel the loss, and 
perhaps will say as one often hears said, 
" I wish I roomed in a private house in- 
stead of in this dormitory." This ought 
not to be thus. There is, of course, reason 
in this matter of visiting, as in everything 
else. There may be some information you 
wish, some particular work bearing upon a 
certain branch of study that you could get 
bj' going to your neighbor's room. If such 
be the object, go by all means. Again, you 
may be strongly urged by a man to call 
upon him in his apartments at a certain 
time. If such be the case and you are at 
leisure, then feel at liberty to become his 
guest, as by so doing much good may often 
be derived, if the conversation is centered 
on subjects of general interest. But the 
prevailing idea is, among a large class of 
students, that they are at liberty to run in 
and out of other's rooms at pleasure, both- 
er the occupants as much as possible in 
their pursuits, and it is all right and proper. 
Break yourselves of this habit, for it is 
nothing but a habit. You not only injure 
yourselves by its practice, but you are cer- 
tainly trampling on the rights of others 
and are doing them a severe injustice. If 
some individual told' you of this when you 
came lounging around his room, while he 



was desirous of studying, you would un- 
doubtedly stamp him a "crank" of the 
worst kind. But kindly take these words 
of advice from Aggie Life as you would 
those of a dear friend, and duly consider 
their import. 



GLEANINGS. 

Jan. 16th, Index comes out. 

Another snow fight is in order. 

Wky does Willard look so queer? 

W. A. Brown, '91, spent Sunday at 
Ware. 

Kirkland '94 went home last week for a 
few days. 

The singing school has started with over 
thirty men. 

Remember the lecture on A Yeast Cake, 
by Prof. Tyler to-night. 

Prof. Mills was unable to take charge of 
the Bible class last Sunday. 

Last Sunday's storm caused rather a 
slight attendance at Chapel. 

Hull and Lage seem to think they have ' 
a mortgage on the class cup. 

How can a Prof., while lecturing, refer ' 
to points mentioned next term? 

W. S. Pember '93 has left college. He 
will remain in town until May. 

J. M. Herrero, '90, will start for his 
home shortly at Jovellanos, Cuba. 

What are you doing, Paige? Isn't it 
about time to commence base-ball practice ? 

A glowing tribute — Dr. Goessmann : Go 
to Mr. Smith, he knows everything about 
here. 

Don't forget the half dollar due the Ath- 
letic Association, as they are sadly in need 
of it. 

The increased amount of HjO oa the 
pond last Thursday caused the dam to 
break away. 

The first and second lectures of the Union 
Lecture Course were crowded as they 
deserved to be. 

Within the last ten days the pedestrians 
and the sidewalk have been on terms of 
shocking familiarity. 

P. E. Davis, J. E. Cook, E. C. Howard 
and T. F. Keith were elected members of 
the M. A. C. Boarding Club. 

In all probability there will be a Senior 
promenade directly after the President's 
reception next Commencement. i 

H. E. Crane, '92, who has been at home 
for some time afflicted with an ulcerated , 
sore throat, returned last Monday. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



6i 



C. S. Nauss, ex-'92, is spending a few 
days about college. We heartily welcome 
him to the scenes of his old associations. 

Next Thursday is a day of prayer for 
colleges. Rev. E. W. Gaylord of North 
Amherst will probably address the stu- 
dents. 

The drill-hall is now lighted evenings 
and it is hoped the students will improve 
the opportunity thus offered them of tak- 
ing exercise. 

The Governor has referred the decision 
of the question pending between the Insti- 
tute of Technology and this college, con- 
cerning the recent grant, to the Legislature. 

Gen. Howard witnessed the dress par- 
ade and company drill while here. He 
was much pleased with the battalion and 
was surprised to receive his salute of 
thirteen guns. 

Our delegates to the convention of New 
England College Y. M. C. Associations 
to be held at Williamstown Feb. 6-8, are 
Pres. H.T. Shores, Cor. Sec. E. T. Clark 
and F. S. Hoyt. 

Hon. James S. Grinnell of Greenfield 
and Hon. Joseph A. Harwood of Littleton, 
whose terms of service as members of the 
Board of Trustees expired this month, have 
been re-appointed to the Board. 

One of our best exchanges is the Purdue 
Exponent. It is always bright and inter- 
esting and full of snap, qualities of the 
greatest value in a college journal. In the 
January issue A Novellette and Why Not 
Play Tennis? are of special interest. 

Friday, Jan. 16th, Representative Smith 
of Amherst offered the following order : 
" Ordered, That the committee on military 
affairs consider the expediency of transfer- 
ring to the Massachusetts Agricultural Col- 
lege such state military property as the 
College is now accountable for." 

A new arrival at our exchange table is 
the Swarthmore PJioenix, from Swarthmore 
College, Penn. It is a first class monthly 
and shows some very good literary work, 
still it fails, as most monthlies must, in 
recording much of the inner college life 
that is so interesting to all readers. 

Unfortunately for the skating races on 
the Connecticut, a heavy snowstorm came 
up Saturday morning, Jan. 17tli, and put 
a damper on the sport. There would 
have undoubtedly have been a good many 
on the river to watch the races as thirty 
men were going over in a large team. 
However let us not lose heart, for the races 
will come off just as soon as there is any 
more good skating. 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College 
Club of New York has elected the following 
officers for the ensuing year: Asa W. 
Dickinson '74, Pres't ; Edgai' H. Libbey 
'74, 1st Vice-Pres't ; C. E. Young '81, 2nd 
VicePres't; A. W. Lublin '84, Sec'y- 
Treas. ; John A. Cutter '82, Choregus. 
The business office of the club has been 
removed to 529 Broadway, Room 96. Mr. 
Lublin extends a cordial invitation to 
everyone connected with the college, who 
may visit New York, to make the office 
their headquarters. 

The annual meeting of the Board of 
Control of the State Experiment Station 
was held at the office of the secretary of 
the Board of Agriculture, in Boston, Jan. 
9, 1891. The report of the treasurer 
showed receipts for the year 1890, of $13,- 
342.07; expenses of $12,998.21 ; cash on 
hand, $343.86. The value of the property 
of the station was shown to be $38,789.50. 
The following officers were elected for the 
ensuing year: Vice-president, Pres. H. H. 
Goodell of Amherst ; secretary and auditor, 
Wm. R. Sessions of Hampden ; treasurer, 
F. E. Paige, Esq., of Amherst; director. 
Dr. C. A. Goessmann of Amherst. 

Last Friday evening the Washington 
Irving Literary Society met and discussed 
the following question. Resolved, that the 
railroads should be controlled by the gov- 
ernment. The weight of argument and 
the merits of the question were in the af- 
firmative. Mr. E. W. Morse was elected 
a member. Next Fridaj- evening the fol- 
lowing question will be discussed — Re- 
solved, that foreign immigration should be 
restricted. Appointments as follows : 1st 
Aff. W. H. Ranney, 2d Aff. H. G. Stock- 
well, 1st Neg. F. T. Harlow, 2d Neg. A. 
R. Streeter. Declamation by F. L. Green, 
reading by G. E. Smith, essay by E. L. 
Boardman. 



The annual meeting of the Board of 
Trustees of the Mass. Agr'l College was 
held in Boston, Jan. 8, 1891. The report 
of the treasurer showed the receipts for 
the year 1890 to have been $52,374.66 ; 
amounts paid, $48,686.32 ; cash on hand, 
Dec. 31, 1890, $3,688.34. The real estate 
of the college is valued at $233,840.00 and 
the personal property at $46,164.37 or a 
total of $280,004.37. The receipts from 
funds for the maintainauce of the college 
amounted to $30,794.'. 3 in 1890. 

His excellenc}' Wm. E. Russell was 
elected president; Hon. James S. Grinnell 
of Greenfield, vice-president ;Hon. Wm. R. 



Sessions of Hampden, secretary ; Frank E. 
Paige, Esq., of Amherst, treasurer; Hon. 
Chas. A. Gleason of New Braintree, audi- 
tor. The standing committee elected were 
the same as recorded in the catalogue of 
the college for 1890, page 40. 

It was voted that the committee on leg- 
islation be instructed to make application 
to the Legislature to have the military 
property of the state, now in the hands of 
the college, turned over to the college. 



THE GYMNASIUM. 

Before this reaches our readers we hope 
that the work of repairing the apparatus in 
the Drill Hall will be well under way. An 
inventory has been taken of what repairs 
are necessary and some money has been 
raised. The directors thought it advisable 
to call for a tax of fifty cents from each 
man in college. The secretary and treas- 
urer has been delayed about collecting by 
a press of other business, but now he is 
more at leisure and will collect the residue 
as soon as possible so that repairs and new 
purchases may be made expiditiously. 

A few chest-weights need to be repaired, 
and as soon as they are attended to a cir- 
cular roof will be built over the striking- 
bag, so that the latter will return quickly 
after a blow. We hope also, with the per- 
mission of Lieut. Cornish, to add a few new 
machines to our present outfit. A vaulting- 
horse, for instance, would be a popular and 
useful article, and could be easily set out 
of the way pending drill hour. A com- 
plete rowing machine, too, might be made 
by adding a sliding seat, handles and out- 
riggers to one of the back and loin machines 
and it would not be large enough to serious- 
ly interfere with drill manoeuvres. It is 
hoped also that we can bring the horizontal 
bar nearer the floor, by means of a detach- 
able post, to be set just below the shorter 
post and secured at top and bottom with 
bolts. 

It is highly desirable that if anyone 
should break or injure any piece of appa- 
ratus he should report the damage at once 
to a director, for the Association will itself 
repair all harm done in legitimate use of 
the machines. 

We earnestly request our fellow students 
to pay their taxes to the Sec.-Treas. when 
he asks for them, or as soon as possible 
after, as demurring to do so would be a 
blow to the general interests which the 
officers of the Association represent. 

A. G. E. 



62 



AGGIE LIFE. 



C, H. S4NDERS0^& CO., 



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Dry and Fancy Goods, 



HOSIERY, RIBBONS, fAND SMALL 
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A FINE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

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'Orders promptly attended to 
1'. 0. Box, 319 AMHERST, MASS. 



LAST MEMORIES. 

Our foot-ball team has passed away. 

And with them all their care, 
Eor on a cool December night 

Tliey climbed tlie golden stair. 
Their muddy suits are laid away. 

And likewise all their fame ; 
For in the course of three long months 

They captured just one game. 

The rush-line was a solid set 

Of Agricultural boys, 
And when they lined up for a V 

They made a terrible noise. 

And worked like demons in a fight, 

Determined to win or die. 
But to some of us they worked enough 

To eat a "hash house" pie. 

Now as the days were passing by. 
And tliey like toughs did look, 

The Manager took them all down town 
And had their picture "took." 

And as they grouped themselves around 
They found that some were late, 

And the artist had to hurry so 
He almost smashed a plate. 

But now they are dead and gone, 
Tlieir virtues we may remember. 

And how they suddenly left us 
On that cool night in December. 

And in conclusion we would say 
That they did excel in bunting 

And strange to say tliey won a game 
When they were out "Stagg" hunting. 

H. E. C. 



MUSIC IN COLLEGE. 

There are few things iu our college life 
that give more pleasure or that serve to 
enliven us mc^re than music. We all have 
one instrument, the voice, which with 
proper training is an inexhaustible source 
of pleasure. 

Whenever a number of students get 
together lor a good time, college songs are 
nearly always resorted to and are thorough- 
ly enjoyed by everyone. 

Among so many students it would seem 
to be an easy matter to select eight or ten 
good singers for the choir, but, on the con- 
trary, experience has shown that it is diffi- 
cult to get first class ones. There are a 
great many who can sing by ear, but who 
cannot read music, and so are not fit to 
sing in a choir, allhough they may have 
excellent voices. Now one of the principal 
objects of tlie singing school is to enable 
us to read music well, and it is the duty, 
as well as the privilege of a person having 
a good voice to learn how to use it. The 
Faculty have been very kind in otTering us 
the advantages of a singing school during 
the winter term, and all who care anything 
for music should show their appreciation 
by attending the rehearsals. 




\.. 



Business is business. FRANK WOOD will get up 
Spreads for the Boys this winter. Send your orders 
right along to get there first. 



Do you want a nice warm Ulster? 

A Toboggan Tuque to wear skat- 
ing or sleighing? 

If so call on us. 

We have some dandy Black 
Cheviot Suits. We have a big 
trade at your college and use the 
boys right. 

BLODGETT S (ShRf{K 



JOHN MULLEN. 



-DEALER IN- 



MEATS and PROVISIONS, 

VEGETABLES OF ALL KINDS IN SEASON, 

FISH AND OYSTERS, FOREIGN 

AND DOMESTIC FRUITS, 

AND CANNED 

GOODS. 

Palmer's Block, Main Street. 



E. R. BENNETT, 
Jeweler, 

Optician, 

Watchmaker. 

FINE GOODS ! LOW PRICES ! 

GOOD WORK WARRANTED. 

First Door from Post Office. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



63 



IF YOU WANT TO GET OYSTERS IN ANY 
STYLE GO TO 

E. B. ARNOLD'S 

OYgTEfi 0SPE, 

Students are attended at sliort notice, 



Open all clays of the week uutil 12 o'clock. 
Sundays from 9 a. m. to 12-30 p. m., and from 
7 p. M. to 11 p. M. 

William's Block, Merchants' Row. 



The title page of this book was drawn and engraved by 

John S*"'"^'Sj 

6 Davis Street, BOSTON, MASS. 

The various publications ot Bates, Bowdoin, Colby, 
Tufts, Mass. Agricultural College, Wellesly and Yale 
have used his work. He will submit sketches and cari- 
catures for your approval. 



OFFICE OF 



EDWAED A. THOMAS, 

Fii|E/\D Life Insurance JlGEfiT, 

REAL ESTATE EOR SALE AND TO LET. 



Ojficej Cooks JBloch, Amherst^ Mass, 



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Painters' Supplies 

Personal attention given to Frescoing, Dec- 
orating and Paper Hanging, and all 
Interior and Exterior 
House Painting. 

Pleasant St., near L J. Spear's Shop, 



AMHERST COLLEGE 

CO-OPERAIIVE STEi LAUNDRy 

and Carpet Renovaving Establisliment, 



Aggie Agent, H. M. HOWARD, '91. 

Work taken Monday delivered Wednesday. 
" " Wednesday delivered Saturday. 

S.A.TISI^A.CTIOKr OXJ.A.E.A.lSrTBElE), 

OFFICE AT BRINE'.S. 

H. A. UTLEY, Manager. 



A very noticeable thing to a person 
attending Chapel or the Sunday morning 
service for the first time is the scarcity of 
singing books. There are only a few 
books and part of those are so torn and 
worn out as to be of little use. To one 
who likes to sing, it is sometimes very 
unpleasant to hear others about him sing- 
ing and to have no book himself. 

If a few more singing books will improve 
the singing in our religious services, why 
can we not have them? 

F. H. H., '93. 



NOTES FROM A DIARY. 

"Swipes! Oh, Swipes !" The cheerful 
words came floating up througli the wintry 
air to my window, through which the noon- 
day sun was streaming, making a broad 
patch of yellow liglit on my carpet. 

I looked out, and for a moment forgot 
the dry and uninteresting text book to en- 
joy the little scene below. 

A few students, pausing on their way, to 
watch the antics of a very dirty looking 
dog. A common sight, no doubt, and yet 
as I heai'd the merry laugh, and noticed 
the good natured looks of both students 
and dog, I couldn't help but feel that my 
time was not wasted. It is just such 
incidents as these that help make enjoy- 
able the sometimes dreary routine of 
student life. 

So I thought, as in obedience to the im- 
perative call of the bell, I went to recita- 
tion, with the words ringing in my ears, 
"Swipes ! Oh, Swipes !" 

Early one afternoon last week, as I was 
strolling around the college, I could but 
wonder what had become of everybody. 
The reading room, usually at this time full 
of students waiting for theii letters from 
home, was deserted. Amazed at this cir- 
cumstance, I entered the dormitories. No 
one was in sight, but from the rooms there 
issued loud and boisterous laughter, min- 
gled now and then with expressions " a la 
French." Soon I caught a glimpse of a 
person hurrying out of the "tower," and 
disappearing. Soon another and another 
followed him, looking to the right and 
left as if ill fear of assault. I accosted a 
Senior as to the meaning of all this. "Why 
man, yon are behind times," he said, "the 
Index has appeared, and these are the edi- 
tors." 

Arms, POKT ! It is the same old story, 
three days in the week, twelve weeks in 
the term, three terms in the year, "and so 
on to infinity." 

The Captain slowly comes down the line. 



How quickly the thoughts flash through 
our brain. We wonder if our shoes are 
blacked. How we long to remove our eyes 
just for an instant from that crack in the 
floor which marks the fifteen yard line. We 
can almost feel the watchful eye of the 1st 
Lieutenant behind us. Then our mind 
wanders, and we wonder how those prob- 
lems are to be done, and if we will have 
hash for supper, and who that young lady 

is that justcame in. and — "Private ! 

Report to the Commandant !" 

Any one who will go over to the gyva- 
nasium during practicing hours will have a 
chance to get an idea of the base ball pros- 
pects. I went in there the other day to 
see how the boys were getting along, but 
soon retired for my own safety with a viv- 
id imagination of triumphant victories and 
the firing of Lieut's powder. But remem- 
ber, the players cannot do all the work. 
Let every student do his duty when that 
"tax-fiend" comes around. 

C. F. W. 



HINTS ON STUDY. 

How manj- students know how to study 
in the best way? We all agree that by 
studying, we mean the application of the 
mind to a certain subject or object, for the 
purpose of obtaining information. Now, 
how is this to be done ? In the first place 
a student must possess the ability to con- 
centrate his mental powers on one thing. 
To do this thoroughly he must be free from 
disturbances of all kinds, he must be in 
perfect health, and have his mind free from 
all other duties. It is useless to attempt 
to study when the body is tired and the 
whole S3'stem demanding rest ; the attempt 
results in little more than a continual strug- 
gle to keep the attention on the lesson be- 
fore the student, or, perhaps, after an hour 
or so of such mental strain he succeeds in 
subordinating the physical nature to the 
demands of the intellect and really acquires 
considerable knowledge ; in fact, he seems 
to have forgotten that he was tired. But 
knowledge obtained by such means is very 
dear, for the student has been studying on 
his nerve power ; he has been sapping his 
life to obtain a little more knowledge. 
This is a crime against himself, but many 
practice it, and in later life these same 
men wonder why they break down so soon. 

In college, it is very easy to undermine 
the health by working daytimes and study- 
ing nights, and many who are not obliged 
to work accomplish the same thing by using 
all their energy in pleasure. 

If any man should keep regular hours, 



64 



AGGIE LIFE. 



a'nd have abundant sleep, it is iHe college 
student. The four years spent in college 
are plenty long enough to wreck the strong- 
est constitution. Again, we see students 
studying a text book, blindly, accepting all 
that is set before them, without questioning 
for themselves whether the principles pre- 
sented by the author are the true ones or 
not. 

A student should take time enough to 
rfeasoo out these principles for himself and 
thus train himself to discern between the 
true and the false. 

One of the great failures of the Ameri- 
can people is that they are always in a 
hurry and rarely take time enough to do a 
thing well. As intelligent college men we 
should recognize this tendency, and guard 
against it, while in college, by taking time 
enough to thoroughly master the principles 
brought to our notice. If we do this, we 
shall form a habit that will cling to us 
through life. E. P. F. 



PRAYER MEETING TOPICS. 

Jan. 29. — Fleeing to Tarshish. Jonah 
1 :3. J. Baker. 
Feb. 1.— r Omnipotence, Dent. 10:17. 

God's -< Omniscience, Ps. 139 : 1-6. 
Attributes (^Omnipresence, Ps. 139: 7. 
W. A. Brown. 

Feb. 5.— The Fatal Choice. Gen. 3 :l-6 
G. E. Smith. 

Feb. 8.— Christ's Pledge. John 6 :37. 
W. H. Ranney. 



At a meeting of the Faculty held Dec. 
19th it was voted : — 

1. — That when a student is admitted to 
the Freshman class with conditions, he 
shall be examined in the middle of the 
term, and if he fail to pass, he shall be 
examined again two weeks before the end 
of the term. If he fail to pass at this 
time he shall be dropped from the college. 

2. — When a student is conditioned at 
the end of the term in one, two or three 
studies, he shall be examined at the mid- 
dle of the next term. If he fail to pass 
he shall be examined again two weeks be- 
fore the end of the term and if he then 
fail, he shall be dropped back into the 
succeeding class. 

3. — When a student's average in each 
of four or more studies iu a term falls be- 
low the required standard, he shall be 
dropped back into the succeeding class. 

4. — When a member of the Senior class, 
because of illness or any other reason, is 
not able to pass one or more of his exami- 
nations before Commencement, his degree 
shall be witheld until all conditions are 
made up. 



E, B, DISKII^SOI], D, D, S, 



#-DEI]TfiL l^OOIQS,-^ 



KELLOGG'S BLOCK, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Office Hours, 9 to 12 a. m., 1-30 to 5 p. M. 



JJS-Ether and Nitrous OxUle Gas .idmiuisterecl when 
desired. 



A.T THE 



>MHERST CASH SHOE STORE, 

You can s:et the most for your money. 
BOOTS AND SHOES, RUBBERS, OVER- 
SHOES, SLIPPERS, TRUNKS, 
AND BAGS. 



A. X. PETIT, 

TEACHER OF DANCING. 

Evening Class every Tuesday evening. Private lessons 
when desired.. Hall in Dickinson's Block (over Lee & 
Phillips'). P. O. address, Amherst, Mass. 



REPAIRING NEATLY DONE. 



HAWES & STINSON, 



CASH ROW, AMHEEST, MASS. 



AMHERST HOUSE 



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T. L PAIGE, Prop'r. 



HACKS TO AND FROM ALL TRAINS, OM- 
NIBUSES, HACKS, DOUBLE AND 
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AT SHORT NOTICE. 
CAREFUL DRIVERS. FAIR PRICES. 

AMUEItST; MASS. 



Mass. Agi|icultural College, 

• Botanical Department, 

AMHERST, MASS. 

We would infonii the friends of the college, 
and the public generally, that we are prepared 
to supply 

FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND 

SHRUBS, SMALL FRUITS AND 

PLANTS, 

true to name, also 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 
all at the lowest price. 

For Trees, Plants, Shruljs, Flowers and Small 
Frnits, address. 

Prof. S. T, Maynard, 

AMHERST. MASS 



THE AMHERST 



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A complete line of goods suited to the students' 
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CARPETS, RUGS, ETC., ETC.. 



All goods Stylctly Cash and at Zoivest Prices, 



E. D. MARSH, 



10 PHGEXIX ROW, 



AMHEEST, M.4SS. 



Sheei M^usic. 



M\i:^ic Books 
Strings 

K(»K THE VIOLIN, BANJO. GUITAR, 



Ciishman's Music Store, 



,A.]V[ia EK.ST. 



J, M, WAITE k SON, 



AND DKALKR.S IN 



Hats, Caps, Furs, Trunks, Bap, Furnishing Goods, 

Latest Styles in Fuvuishiugs. Ageut for 

Knox's aud Youmau's Hats. Sole 

Agent for Pittsfleld 

Laundry. 

H./\TS Repaired. Furs Renovated 

Give lis a call beiorr purchasing. 
NO. 5 I^SmNIX ROW, AMHERST, MASS, 



^mbr^t Mouse, 



AJIHERST, JFASS. 



The undersigned is pleased to announce 
to his former patrons and others desiring 
Game Spreads or Dinners, that he is always 
prepared to accomodate (at short notice) 
large or small parties. 

Ample dining room cajaacity for 21)0 peo- 
l)ie. 

LORENZO CHASE, Prop'R. 



.(.DENTISTS. G).. 

C. S. GATES, D. D. S. 
T. G. HUNTINGTOlf^, D. D. S. 

CjrTLER'S TtLOCK, AMBEBST, MASS. 



Ol'FlUE HOURS: 
9 J\.- 1!^- TO 5 F. 3VC. 



Ether and Nitrims ( ix'nlr ailiniiiisteri'd when 
ilesirefl. 



F7OWBS ^ I^BJjLOtiCa, 



DIOALKK.S IN 



^•gT'UDEP'S SUPPLIES'^ 

FANCY GKO(!EI!.IES, CKOOKEliy, CIGARS, 

CIG.VliKTTES, 'J'OBACCO. FRUITS 

AND C< »NFECTIONERY, 

LitrQP mom mij) KEi?02BriB oil, 

SDoors South of r. O., - AMUERSI', MASS. 

EDWIN NELSON, 

Books and Stationery, 

Ne.'ct door to Post Oftice, 
AMHERST, MASS. 

WOOD'S HOUSE 

, Razors H()ned and Shears Sharpened at 
short notice. 

AMHERST, MASS. 

0. R. KENFTELD, 

-->JEWELBlt,^ 



Wood'.t Hlock, 



Amherst, Mass. 



SPECIAI-. 



A Stem Wind liiid Sot W.lltliaui. H:ini|)(lcii, El^iii or II 
liniii.^ inovcim'iit in i\ (Jolil Filled Cnso 1'(n' .sl.'i.no. 



Umbrellas (■overed -while you wait, also dealer 
in Gnns, Ritles. Aniinnnitinii and Sporlins Goods 
of all kinds. Amateur I'hoto.nraphie (Jnttits aud 
Supplies. Views aud I'ictnres taken wlr/u de- 
sii'ed. \'icws of Amherst and \'iciuity for sale. 
Call aud see liefore pnrehasiiit;- clseAvlu're. 

.itaWATCH AND CLOCK REPAIRING A SPECIALTY,. Jar 



J. L. LOVELL, 

^PHOTO&RftPHE]^,^ 

DRY PLATES, COMPOUND DEVELOPER 
■ AND SENSITIZED PAPER. READY 
F(yR USE. 



H.O. P 



H 



H 



Haiit Tailor, 



^A.3Sd:i3:EE.ST, 



3S^.A.SS. 



el. fl. I^AWSON, 



DEALKR IN 



WftTgHES, gL0«K2, JBWBL!(Y 

FINE POCKET CUTLERY, SILVER AND 

PLATED WARE, OPTICAL GOODS 

CANES, SPORTING AND 

FANCY GOODS, 

Gold Pens, Fine Stationery 



REPARING NEATLY and PROMPTLY DONE. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



DwiGHT ffioor^E, 
BILLIARD AND POOL 



F^i^P^X^OI^, 



PRINTING FOR AMATEURS 



Done in the best mamier. 



IMHERSr, MASS. 



.'i I'/ta-ni.v liotv ( Ifp-stttirs ), 
AMHERST, MASS. 



Massachusetts Agricultural College, 




iVirxlaersst, i^dto^ss. 



;l^. -^r Ori^-^.^ 







VOL. I, 



AMHERST, MASS., FEBRUARY n, 1891, 



NO. 9. 



k 



i 



H. SAN-DERS0^4 CO., WHERE DO YOU BOY YOUti 



(' \SII DKAIJOUS IN 



aRRlNTEiRS,'^ 

AMHERST, . - MASS. 



Mass, Acf^icuLTURAL College, . 

Botanical Department, 

AsiirEKST, ;\rASS. 

We Avoiiul iiil'onii tlic I'l'li'iuls of tlir colk'g(>, 
niid the public .ucu'/nilly. VavA. ^^\-^' nrc pi-cpared 
to supply 

FRUIT AND OHNAMKXTAL TREES A\M) 

SITRUI!S\ SMALL FRUITS AND 

I'LAXTS. 

l.rii:' to iiaiiii'. also 

fT'l' FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 
all at til" lo\^■('-t iivii'c. 
For 'I'lvcs. I'laid-. Slinil)s, Mowers anil Small 
F'riiits, aiUlrcss. 

Prof. S. T. Maynard, 

AMHERST, MASS 



^■piDE awmim 



Hats, Caps, Umbrella*', and Gents' 
Furnishing Goods, 



CASH ROW, 



AMHERST. 



S/NDEi|S0H &' Thompson, 

(' VSU DKAI.Klis IX 

Dry and Fancy Goods, 



Meerechaum Pipes? 
French Briar Pipes ? 
Choice Toliaceo? 
Sponges? 
Soap? 

Hair Prnshes from 2~> cts. up? 
Combs I'roiii 5 cts. nji? 
Clioice New York Confectionery? 
Shaving Mugs? 
Shaving Soap? 
Lather Brushes? 
. Cigarettes, fresli every two weeks? 
Tlie Best Soda in Aiherica? 
The Best Bay llnm? 
Importe<l Perfumes? 
Prescriptions prepared by licensed pliarniacists? 
Imported Domestic T'ooth Brushes? 

If you have not obtained these neces,saries at 
DEUEL'S DPtrC STORE, you have begun 
wrong. ])euers is the leading Drug • Store in 
Western Mass.. and keejis the largest assort- 
ment of goods at bottom prici's. 



HOSIERY, RIBBONS, 'AND SMALL 
WARES OF ALL KINDS. 



m STORL 



AMHERST. MASS. 



Amtierst House Block, Amiierst, lass. 



THE AMHERST 



BOOTS^SHOES 

FOR EVERYBODY. 



HENRY ADAMS, 

PHARMACIST, 



WW. 



FURNITURE AND CARPET STORE, 



■I't^fs; 



A complete line (t( goods suited to the students' 
wants. 

BKDSTEADS^, M.VTTr.ESSES. PILLOWS, 

yi'UDY DE SKS AND CHAIRS . 

LorNCES 

WINDOW SII.VDES. DR.VI'EKIES, 

C.\R I'ETS. RITJS. ETC.. l^TC. 

.Ill !/„i,il.-: Slih-llff Cash (itiiliit l.nifcut I'rii-cs. 



K. [). MARSH, 



10 I'lilKSLXiWOW, 



AiMIIICliST, iM,\S,S. 



SO. I C'OOK'.S BLOCK. 



AMHERST, MA.- 



.\ fim: mm; i>k srcoHNTS' 

DRESS SHOES. IN PATENT LEATHER. 

BALS. AND CONGRESS. 

.\ l''ULI. I.IXK OF 

R.XJBBEE, C3-OOI3S, 

Idirr-liALL .SHOKS AT LOWEST CASH PltlCKS. 

Repairing Done Promptly. 



T, W. SLOAN, 

■J I'lKKNIX HOW. 



S, J,. SULLIVAN, 

Second'Hand Clothes 

ANO 

furniturp:. 

l-^^'Orilcrs |ir()iiii)tly nttendeil to.^^J 
I', O. l!o.\. ;il!l AMHERST, MASS. 



Pure Daigs and iVledicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES. IMPOKT- 

ED AND IJOMESTIC CIGAPS. 

CIGARETTES, ETC., 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, 

FISHING T.\CKLE AND SPORTING GOODS. 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, and Sp(U'ting 
antl Springtield Rifles. 

Sunday and night calls responded to at resi- 
dence, first door west of AVood's Hotel. 



(Drugs, Medicines, 

TOILET ARTICLES. 

"•ONFECTIONERY, CIGARS. CIGARETTES 

.\N-D SMOKERS' (iOODS. 



riiYSiCTAA's' j'lti'scnimo^'s CAJfK- 



'$ PHft]^n]ftgY, 



(! I'HUONLX ROW. 

Order your COJkK liPre, 



AGGIE LIFE. 



VOL. I. 



AMHERST, MASS., FEBRUARY 11, 1891. 



No. 9 



QUALIFICATIONS OF THE ORATOR. 

Oratory is a certain power of persuasive 
eloquence which cannot be borrowed from 
another, or attained by storing up elocu- 
tionary principles in the mind ; it must 
exist in the man, and flashing forth from 
his ever}' feature, finds easy expression in 
words both true and forcible. 

One of the first essentials to the success 
of the orator is a clear perception. A public 
speaker, to hold the attention ot liis audi- 
ence, must first have a clear apprehension 
of what he wishes to say. 

Next in importance is the memory. The 
true orator is he whose head is filled with 
facts, which, readily called to mind when 
desired, have the power, as they fall from 
his lips, of moulding the sensibilities of the 
hearers, even as the huge trip-hammer, fall- 
ing upon the rough piece of metal, converts 
it into the form desired. Witli the strong 
memory, there should be a lively imagina- 
tion. This is needful that the orator mwy 
be able to put liis ideas and facts instantly 
and gracefully into smooth, flowing lan- 
guage, as circumstances require. 

Next, and perhaps of no less importance, 
is logical acuteness — that ability to express 
truths with such systematic accuracy that 
the hearers can see no possible conclusion 
except that which the speaker would have 
them see. This power fails of its efficiency 
when clearness of mind and quickness of 
apprehension are wanting to distinguish the 
principles involved. Such was the case to 
some extent with John C. Calhoun ; he was 
possessed of uncommon logical acuteness, 
but failing to examine carefully his pre- 
mises, his precise logical arguments some- 
times led him to astounding, or even absurd 
conclusions. 

A strong will supported by integrity of 
purpose and manly character is another of 
the moral elements essential to the orator. 
One who is to persuade others to action 
must first have tlie strong determination 
deep-seatid in his own nature. This it was 
that gave Mr. Adams such a power in the 
Congress of 1776. Those memorable 
words attributed to him, "Live or die, sur- 
vive or perish, I am for the Declaration," 
possessed a magnetism that stirred the 
bosom of every true patriot in the Colonies. 
We sometimes meet persons who, having 



tills peculiar trait of character in a marked 
degree, exert unconsciously a subtle in- 
fluence on those about them, by every word 
they utter, like the action of a hidden mag- 
net beneath the paper of iron filings. 

Again, the orator finds frequent use for 
the passionate nature. The emotional 
trait is well illustrated in the charactei' of 
Daniel Webster. He had a loving nature 
and a warm, generous heart. Think of 
Webster effectually pleading the famous 
Dartmouth College ease without the accom- 
panying throbbing of his great passionate 
heart, as the sympathetic tears rolled from 
his noble face. It was his powerful reason- 
ing, " permeated and made red-hot with 
passion," that won that case, and with it, 
for him, world-wide renown. 

But to express the passions most forci- 
bly, certain qualifications of the voice are 
quite necessary. This power in its perfec- 
tion demands a well-trained, penetrating 
and wide-ranging voice, by which all the 
delicate variations of sense, the agitations 
and shudderings Of the heart, no less than 
the strongest acts of the intellect, may find 
an accent. 

Dr. Matthews says that " eloquence is a 
physical as well as an intellectual product." 
In addition to the earnest, penetrating 
voice, an orator should have the bodily 
power and activity of the atlilete ; the 
strong, robust physique to sustain him dur- 
ing protracted seasons of severe nervous 
tension. 

The most powerful speakers, in all ages, 
have been distinguished for bodily stamina. 
They were men " who, while they had suffi- 
cient thought-power to create all the mate- 
rial needed, had preeminently the explosive 
power by which they could thrust their 
materials out at men." It was said of 
Lord Erskine that " his action sometimes 
reminded one of a blood-horse. When 
urging a plea with passionate fervor, his eye 
flashed, the nostril distended, he threw 
back his head, his neck was clothed with 
thunder. There was in him the magnifi- 
cent animal, as well as the proud and fiery 
intellect, and the whole frame quivered 
with pent-up excitement." 

It has been said that " there is no effort 
of the human miud which demands a rarer 
combination of (acuities than does oratory 
in its loftiest flights." And although the 



eloquence of the true orator can be attained 
only by the few, yet that fact should deter 
no one from aiming high. 

As college graduates, we shall be called 
upon sooner or later, more or less frequent- 
ly, to express our thoughts in public, and 
then the importance of knowing how to 
express an idea in clear, vigorous English 
will be keenly felt. 

How shall this power be acquired? We 
are here preparing for our life work. If 
we neglect any part of that preparation, 
we shall fail in a measure to meet the de- 
mands that the world justly makes upon us. 
Frequent use of the pen in writing cannot 
be urged too strongly as a means for culti- 
vating a good style of expression. It is 
encouraging to see this branch of instruc- 
tion occupying a more important place in 
the college curriculum than it has hereto- 
fore. In regard to the value of composi- 
tion as a means for educating the thought 
powers, Cicero says that in writing on a 
subject we give more than usual attention 
to it, and thus many things are suggested 
to us of which we should otherwise never 

have thought. 

In order to make the most of our instruc- 
tion in composition and oratory, it is of 
prime importance that everything should 
be done to the best of our ability. By put- 
ting careful and persistent study on every 
attempt in this line, we will become accus- 
tomed to choose the best words in which to 
clothe our thoughts, thus giving beauty and 
finish as well as force and vividness to the 
production. 

Another practice which has proved very 
beneficial to many is that of carefully read- 
ing and re-reading the best authors, com- 
mitting the finest passages to memoiT, so 
■ as to be able to repeat them at any moment 
I without effort. In this way the memory is 
; strengthened and the mind enriched by the 
; thoughts of others expressed in the hap- 
' piest language. Burke was especially fond 
'of Virgil aud Milton, and his speeches 
sparkled with poetical gems from their 
I writings. William Pitt deposited in the 
cells of his memory numerous fine passages 
from the Greek, Latin and English poets 
which he afterward wove into his speeches 
' with the most telling effect. It is said that 
' Erskine was so familiar with Shakespeare 
! that he could almost have held conversa- 



66 



AGGIE LIFE. 



tion for days on all subjects in the phrases 
of the great English dramatist. 

Still another help to the youthful orator 
is found in conversation. It may seem 
strange to speak of a college student as 
not knowing how to converse ; yet the fact 
should not be overlooked that there are 
young men in our colleges who prove a bore 
to their companions or society, either from 
their inability to carry on any conversation 
whatever, or from their capacity to talk 
continually without really saying anything. 

There are certain qualities needed in 
public discussion that are readily cultivated 
bj' conversation ; some of these are, rapid- 
ity of thought, skill in seizing the strong 
points of a subject, exactness of statement, 
facility of expression and general mental 
alertness. 

Finally, it seems that faith in one's self, 
so necessary to successful exertions in any 
calling, is of the greatest importance to the 
orator. If he distrusts his own powers and 
becomes self-critical, acting continually as 
a spy upon himself, he will almost certainly 
be embarrassed and fail in the attainment 
of his purpose. W. A. B. 



TRAINING FOR ATHLETES. 

The question whether it pays to keep in 
continuous training is now being discussed 
by seme of our prominent athletes, but as 
yet no conclusion has been arrived at. 
There is no doubt in our minds but that it 
is best to remain in good liealth. The ques- 
tion naturally arises, is it best for a man, 
who is excellent in some particular sport, 
to keep in good condition the year round, 
so that he may be able to run a successful 
race in winter as well as in summer? It 
would seem that an athlete once in condi- 
tion could very easily remain so, but is 
there not anoiher side to the question? 

All of us, who have played on base- or 
foot-ball teams, know that as the season 
advances a certain languor lakes hold of 
us. We perhaps train as hard as at the 
first of the season, but we do not meet with 
success. We do our utmost to assist in 
winning a game but do not succeed. Why? 
We have not neglected our practicing and 
have taken every precaution to keep our- 
selves in trim. 

The excuse commonly made is that such 
a fellow is "oft" in his play. Is it not 
because he has overworked and exercised 
more than his muscles demanded? 

Many of our athletic clubs have secured 
large hulls and armories in which the ath- 
letic men are constantly in practice. Here 
the temptations aie strong and he i« given 



no chance to rest, and quite often he starts 
in a race only to drop out when the dis- 
tance is half run. It would seem that bet- 
ter records could be made if the athletic 
men were given time to recuperate, to store 
up enough energy to sustain them in a 
great effort. 

G. B. W. 



A STUDY OF NATURE. 

It was on those balmy Autumn days ' 

That so cheer the heart of man, 
When all Nature seems to clothe herself 

In all the colors that she can, 
That I used to often ■wander 

By the brooklets and the wood lanes, 
For a purpose that was dearer 

Than ought else in this life of banes. 

It was thought by all my classmates 

Who had seen me thus so often go, 
That 'twas for the love of Nature, 

For the study of things high and low, 
For the learning of those rare facts, 

Of which so many wish to know 
In regard to all God's creatures, 

Those that fly and those creeping slow. • 

Or perhaps to study Nature 

As is seen in plant life growing, 
How the greenness of the summer 

Changes to a scene so glowing, 
As is noticed when the harvest time 

Is passing, for the year away, 
And all Nature is preparing 

For bleak and chilling Winter's stay. 

But though good as such may be, 

It was not for these I wandered 
In the wild wood solitudes. 

And by pasture brooklets sauntered. 
It was only for the knowledge. 

That another one was making 
Keproductions of earth's beauties, 

And these on canvas was laying. 

Sometimes in the deepest forest 

Where the scenery was most wild. 
She would set her painting easel. 

And then in her beauty smiled. 
For she well knew e'en though far 

From the byeways of life's thronging. 
There was one that soon would find her, 

For whose presence she was longing. 

And each day when the balmy air 

Gently played among the rustling leaves, 
I would glide away upon my quest 

As buoyant as the springing breeze. 
An inspiration seemed to guide me. 

For my steps led me to the very spot 
Where the artist was, in such 

A way that left no room for lot. 

And sometimes I would softly steal 

Up to the place where I knew she was. 
And gently part the branches, so that I 

Could see the features of the .artist, because 
I knew her thoughts were not entirely bent 

Upon the rugged rocks, that in the landscape 
lay. 
And I desired to analyze the face 

That often turned an expectant look my way. 



After feasting for awhile upon the scene, 

I would then reveal myself unto her sight, 
And the joyous blushing look she gave me 

Proved to me that she was guilty of delight 
And together nciw the work of art goes on. 

For with this type of natural beauty, I 
Can show to her the choicest bits of Nature, 

And sh'e can paint them, as they in Nature lie. 

As the sun in his course doth move 

Towards the radiant west at the close of day, 
We would be roused from our peaceful trance 

And onward for our distant homes would 
move away, 
Witli gleeful hearts and buoyant steps. 

The twilight hours sped quickly by, as we 
With unrestrained emotion express 

Our bright hopes, that shall some day united 
be. 

Thus day by day the lovely artist worked away 
And reproduced Nature's most wondrous 
gifts. 
Sometimes it was the lonely wooded dale. 
Or now the brooks that dash through rocky 
rifts, 
Or perhaps a peaceful meadow scene 
With its silvery thread of water running 
through. 
And on its banks a few kine feeding 
With their heads all raised, as though to look 
at you. 

And now dear fellow student, 

As I have been telling you the reason why 
I have taken these frequent journeys. 

Let me not hear from you one whispered sigh. 
For though I've not done what you surmised. 

And studied all nature, below and above, 
I have learned of the most precious thing to 
know. 

For I ha\'e been learning what it Is to love. 

W. C. P. 



A REVELATION. 



'•Now Tom, remember what I told you.'' 
These were the words that came from the 
mouth of an anxious mother, as she bid 
her son goodby for his second term at 
Aggie. A puzzled expression came over 
his face, but it immediately died away. 
He knew now to what she referred. He 
distinctly recollected her having told him 
when he started for college Sept. 1st, not 
to study too hard and he remembered how 
with tears gushing out of his eyes he un- 
willingly had said, "Mother, I'll try not to." 

Now, as a matter of fact, this particular 
mother had, on the morning previous, been 
giving her son a few hints on the art of 
keeping a "bachelor's hall" successfully. 
She had told him that when he did his 
chamber work in the morning, he should 
do this and that, and the longer she talked 
the paler he became, the muscles of his 
face began to twitch, and his hands caught 
convulsively at the legs of his trousers. 
She, thinking he was ill, assisted him to an 



AGGIE LIFE. 



67 



oDeu window where by virtue of the fresh 
air or a change of subject, he sjowly recov- 
ered. 

Now what was the meaning of all this? 
Perhaps a few words of explanation would 
be gratefully received by this innocent 
mother who should be undeceived. This 
young idol of perfection, her idea ofall a 
model boy should be, has not known such 
a thing as chamber work since he left home. 
"Cleaning up for inspection" he calls it ; 
that comes once a week, and at its ap- 
proach he puts things in respectable order 
simply because he has to. Let us take a 
few moments survey of him and his room. 
He comes into his apartments in the after- 
noon, flings his coat into one chair and his 
hat in another. Here on the mantle piece 
behind the stove is one of his boots, evident- 
ly put there to dry while the mate is under the 
table. In one corner is another table which 
appears to have been overturned in a Fresh- 
man stampede for a smart boy's algebra 
examples and which to save the trouble of 
putting on its proper support he is evidently 
using as a hat rack. A coal hod has become 
entangled on a post of his bedstead, while 
a collar and necktie adorn the opposite 
one. The lordly master of these domin- 
ions is tipped back in a chair, his feet ele- 
vated above his head, his face displaying 
an air of interest in a book, which he is 
reading, entitled, "Hints on Housekeep- 
ing." A fish-horn and a Jew's harp are 
the only musical instruments which adorn 
the room, and it is reported that he is pro- 
ficient on both and will soon take a salaried 
position in the band. Various rade appli- 
ances are seen here and there, all designed 
to make life easy. In this matter of in- 
vention he is quite a genius ; at present he 
is trying to get up a machine to prepare 
lessons without being obliged to study. 

With all his faults this young man has, 
however, a few redeeming qualities. For 
instance, he has a tender heart. Recently 
he took pity on a wandering, forlorn-look- 
ing dog and resolved to take him into his 
confldence, share his humble lodgings with 
him, and submit him to "hash house" bill 
of fare. 

Then he tries to obey his superiors. His 
maternal orders compelled him to let his 
bed clothes air in the morning. He acts 
accordingly and not only leaves his bed 
unmade in the morning but also in the af- 
ternoon. At night remembering he was 
pretty comfortable when he "turned out," 
he coticludes that he cannot improve on 
the feelings of his couch and ^so he jumps 
iu. Thus ends his day, and just above his 



head is a frame wrong side up bearing the 
pathetic motto, "What is Home without a 
Mother." 

G. F. C. 



EXPERIENCE vs. REASON. 

We come from far and near, make, per- 
haps, great sacrifices both of time and 
money, and leave our friends and homes to 
get book-learning. 

We come to the Aggie, a place furnished 
with funds by both the state and national 
governmeots, where there are all the ad- 
vantages of specialties for instructors in 
the vai'ious departments, which are well 
equipped for teaching their special branches 
of science. 

We profess to be anxious to use our 
time to the best advantage and to think 
that the time passed in the class-room is 
spent in the best manner. 

Yet, when it is announced at chapel that 
"Professor So-and-so is unable to meet 
liis classes to-day," smiles of joy illumine 
the faces of those affected by the announce- 
ment, while those who are not so affected 
wonder when one of their Prof.'s will give 
them a day off. 

There is, perhaps, some excuse for this, 
as a lesson off means, to a busy and over- 
worked student, an hour besides the time 
necessary to prepare a recitation, in which 
hour they ma3' write up notes or do some 
other necessary work. 

But the class is pleased at the prospect 
of a "snap" for a time, as a child is with 
a new toy, with the difference that the joy 
lasts longer. And this, when their time is, 
or should be, worth five hundred dollars a 
year to them. 

Is this the result of a remnant of the old 
idea that professors and students are natu- 
ral enemies, the former trying to make it 
as hard as pos.sible for the students? Or, 
is it an outcropping of the natural laziness 
of man, his dislike to earn his living by the 
sweat of his brow? Or, finally, can it be 
that he thinks his time is better spent out 
of the class-roorn ? 

If the first is the reason, let us remember 
that this is the nineteenth century and that 
such ideas are exploded. If the second 
reason influences us, it should be our daily 
endeavor to overcome such laziness. Let 
us not be like the horse tliat was so lazy 
that his master had to hire another horse to 
help him draw his last breath. If the class- 
room is not the best place to spend our 
time, wh^' are we here at all? 

F. L. G. 



A CIRCULAR. 

MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 
ALUMNI CLUB OP MASSACHUSETTS. 

We, wanting to secure a closer union and 
a wider membership, to be upon a more 
solid foundation, and its members to escape 
individual liability, did incorporate under 
the laws of Massachusetts, on November 
nth, 1890. 

The old club of M. A. C. graduates and 
former students of Boston and vicinity, 
held its last meeting at the American 
House, Boston, on November 14th, 1890, 
and unanimously passed the following 
vote : "That we be now merged into the 
chartered Club." 

The incorporated club was then called to 
order by its president, its records read and 
approved, and all those present joined. 
We now have sixty-nine members, and we 
are desirous of having every " Aggie " be- 
come a member. Will you not join us and 
endeavor to interest every "Aggie" in 
your section, in the Club? The only ex- 
pense Connected therewith is the initiation 
fee of one dollar ; there are no annual dues 
or charges of any kind. It is intended to 
have a supper once a year, the expenses of 
which, [as heretofore] are paid by the 
members present. 

As a " Loyal Aggie," will you not join 
this Club at once, lending us your name and 
influence to further strengthen the Club 
and the College ? for there is an important 
appropriation question coming up before 
the present Legislature which we want to 
influence in favor of the College and which 
we hope, by a large representation in a well 
organized Alumni Club, to be better pre- 
pared to do. 

A full list of Club members will be pub- 
lished on February 28th, and will bo for- 
vfarded to members on application to the 
Clerk ; we hope that you will see that j'our 
class is well represented. 

Please send one dollar to Charles L. 
Flint, Treasurer, No. 25 Congress Street, 
Boston, Mass., with your name in full, 
class and address, and receive in return a 
certificate of membership. 

February 6, 1891. 

Officers for 1890-91. 

William Colvard Parker, President; 
Charles L. Flint, Treasurer ; Frederick H. 
Fowler, Clerk, office 1 1, Mt. Vernon Street, 
Boston ; Dr. Austin Peters, Fred G. May, 
Wm. H. Bowkei', Hoard of Directors. 



68 



AGGIE LIFE. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Publislied fortnightly by the Students of the 
Mass. Agricultural College. 



Terms $1,00 per year, in advance- 



Single copies, 10c. 



Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 

BOARD OjF editors : 

B. P. FELT, Editor-in-Chief, 
O. V. B. LAGE, Business Manager, 
A. G. EAMES, '91, H. N. LEGATE, '91, 

J. L. FIELD, '92, G. E. TAYLOE, '93, 

G. F. CURLEY, '9:i. 



Address all communications to the Business Manager. 



No man haa a right to make a nuisance 
of himself, even to the men who room 
under him. Wrestling and iumping are 
all riglit in their place, bat to keep it up 
for some time directly over a man who is 
trying to study is unreasonable, ungentle- 
manly and sliould be promptly stopped. 
If a man wants to take prolonged exercise 
the drill hall is the place. Fellows, bear 
this in mind. 



At times forebearance ceases to be a 
virtue ; such seems to be the case in regard 
to the time kept by the bell. Ordinarily 
it varies from two to five minutes every 
hour; it has even put seventy-flve minutes 
into an hotir ; more than this it has repeat- 
edly failed to ring, especially at 7 a. m. 
We always supposed that the bell was for 
the purpose of regulating ihc college time, 
if so, it is plain the bell needs regulating 
by some one. Pjither give us the correct 
time, or let us keep our own time. 



An inventory of the hymn books used in 
the chai)el services give the following 
results: Ten hymn books in fair order, 
nine hymn books with the covers missing 
and more or less leaves gone ; total, nine- 
teen. These are distributed as follows, 
eight or more to the choir, one to the desk, 
two to members of the Faculty and visitors 
and two to each class. Under such condi- 
tions how can the luhole college join in the 
singing. There should be, at least, sixtj' 
books. When it comes to purchasing them, 
it might be well to bear in mind that some 
other kind might give better satisfaction 



Nekding some statistics, the othei' day, 
upon a subject, the incidents connected 
with which happened about a year ago, I 
went to the Library in search of them, but 
was informed that the only |)lace where I 
would be likely to (ind such information 
was ill the dailies printed at the time. I 
was (brtunate enough to get the desired 



facts from one of the Professors who keeps 
a file of the leading papers. Would it not 
be something of great value to the students, 
as well as Professors, if a file of one or 
more of the leading dailies or weeklies, 
were placed in the Library, and a careful 
yearly index made of the articles contained 
in them, so that each student could have 
access to them. To be sure these papers 
are taken by the Students Beading Room 
Association, bnt no clippings are made, or 
files preserved for future reference, and 
these many times contain articles of great 
value, which can be found in no other 
place. 

We hope that every student will en- 
deavor in some way to influence his Repre- 
sentative in the matter of the government 
appropriation which will come up in the 
Legislature this winter. M. A. C. needs 
that money more than Boston Tech. does, 
and besides it was intended for her benefit 
rather than that of Boston Tech. We may 
rest assured that the President and Trus- 
tees will do their best to secure the appro- 
priation entire, bnt we must not depend on 
their efforts alone. Every man should see 
his Representative, or if circumstances 
make this impossible write him at least one 
letter. Do not neglect it under the mis- 
taken idea that it will do no good. Some- 
times a very little thing will decide a man 
when his mind is wavering in the balance, 
and your letter may be the very thing that 
will turn the scale. Sit down, take your 
pen and write a letter with your heart in 
it. One that will convince the recipient 
that you mean just what you say and know 
just what you are talking about. True 
eloquence consists in having something to 
say and saying it, and surely we can all 
come up to the standard with such a sub- 
ject as this. As loyal students, we can do 
no less for our Alma Mater, and if every 
man takes hold of the matter and does his 
best some result 7nitst follow. 



We are pleased to see that so many take 
advantage of the gymnasium being lighted 
evenings. Nearly every evening we see 
from a few to a score or more taking some 
form of exercise in the hall. This is as it 
should be. We wish every student would 
use the Gymnasium. True, we have not 
a verv large variety of ai^iaratus, and we 
do not hope to produce any first-class gym- 
nasts, but we think that if each one would 
spend a small portion of his time in regular 
practice, we might turn out a number of 
men who would be better fitted to take 



part in other branches of athletics. Foot- 
ball requires that every muscle be full and 
hard ; base-ball more agility but not so 
great endurance. The steady hand, the 
strong arm, the deep chest, the fleet foot, 
will never come amiss in life's battle. 
Moreover, we have another immediate and 
pressing need of all these qualities; For 
the first time in our career as a college, we 
are about to introduce track athletics. If 
we can make creditable records we hope to 
compete with some other colleges, perhaps 
even at Worcester, and there is no reason 
why we cannot make good records ; one 
of our Freshmen, a man who ran last year 
for the Interscholastic Cup said that, in his 
opiniiin, any one who had two feet could 
run, and the same rule, in general, will 
apply to hurdling, walking, jumping and 
pole vaulting. It is argued that the stu- 
dents will not support a track athletic 
team. Well, that was predicted a year 
ago in a college paper and has been the 
cry for years back, against various innova- 
tions but we now have a paper and a gym- 
nasium supported by the students, and if 
once a good team of track athletes takes 
the field, the fellows will not let it be given 
up for want of funds, nor will the alumni 
withold their support where the college 
honor is at stake. Someone raises the 
objection that our men would stand no 
show with men of other colleges, on account 
of the latter's experience. True, we might 
not in years produce a Dohm or a Jane- 
way, but our efforts would not always cul- 
minate in total defeat and the experience 
would certainly be worth the price. The 
most proficient must make a beginning. 
Twenty years ago, when the maroon and 
white crossed the line victorious at Ingle- 
side, driven by six sturdy oarsmen, all 
were surprised, but none more so than 
those same oarsmen and their fellows. 
Nothing will reflect more credit on our 
men than to fail while doing their best. 
The base-ball men have the use of the hall 
in the afternoon, but in the evening there 
is no impediment to general exercise. We 
would say to all, practice faithfully and do 
not be discouraged because someone now 
can do better than you. 



FOR SHAME, GIRLS. 
The evening, for her bath of dew 

Is partially undressed, 
The sun, behind a l)ob-tailed flush. 

Is setting in the West. 
The planets liglit the heavens with 

The flash of their cigars, 
The sky has put his niglit-shirt on. 

And buttoned it with stars. 

— Vasiar Miscellany. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



69 



GLEANINGS. 

Manley lost his hat hxst week. 

Have you heard the Brass Band play ? 

Is the Battalion to camp out next spring ? 

Prof. Mills visited New York last week. 

The battalion is now having sabre drill. 

The drill of last Friday occured Thurs- 
day. 

Staples '93 was sick a few days last 
week. 

H— r to Miss M — . Have you a Razor 
Strop? 

Sedgwick '93 recently spent a few days 
at Dalton. 

A. E. Melendy '93 was on the sick list 
last week. 

Poor pond ! It is among the things that 
have been. 

Mr. Ouo is taking the course in Organic 
Chemistry. 

Pres. Goodell was out of town last 
Wednesday. 

The commissioned officers' new swords 
have arrived. 

The Colorado Collegian is now on our 
exchange list. 

'94 has adopted a constitution ; we hope 
it is a healthy one. 

Sh — s: "Ethel, dear, we have seats in 
the bald headed row." 

Wanted, Subjects for Theses ear- 
nestly desired by all '91 men. 

Week before last '91 listened to cyclone 
stories ; they beat_^s/i stories. 
■■ The W. I. L. S. will have a mock trial 
Febuary 20th. All are invited. 

The M. A. C. Boarding Club has changed 
its supper hour from 5-30 to 6 p. m. 

T. S. Bacon '94 left for his home Feb. 
2. He was afflicted with tonsilitis. 

New ventilating apparatus has been put 
into the greenhouse at the Insectory. 

Have you written to your Representa- 
tive? H. M. Howard '91 has the address. 

Knight hunts foxes on the campus with- 
a lantern mornings when he gets up early. 

Prof. Warner lectured at Granby last 
Tuesday upon "Meterology and the Farm- 
er." 

Men have been at work repairing tlie 
South college fire-escapes for the last few 
days. 

J. B. Brine, college out-fitter, has failed 
and his goods are now in the hands of the 
sheriff. 



The Lieutenant is looking for a case for 
Court Martial. The first offender will be 
the victim. 

There is to to be a company formed for 
sabre drill at the company competitive drill 
tills mouth. 

Feb. 3, Sergeant Beals fearful of getting 
a relapse of his "$10 cold" wears an over- 
coat on drill. 

The Meteorological bulletin for last month 
is changed in form, thereby much improv- 
ing its appearance. 

The college catalogues arrived last week 
Tuesdaj', but owing to a mistake of the 
binder have been returned. 

Recently the Sophomores and Freshmen 
of Smith College had a hard snowball fight. 
It must have baeu interestiug. 

Prof. Maynard has had some new venti- 
lating apparatus put into the upper house 
for the purpose of illustration. 

It is quite eucouragiug to see so many 
in the gymnasium evenings. Improve- 
ments will probably soon be made. 

A. M. Belden, formerly '91, visited us 
last week. He invites his classmates and 
society to attend a wedding at Hayden- 
ville next Tuesday. 

Co. D, by order, go over to put the cannon 
in storage. Prof. Canavau doesn't appear 
to unlock the doors ; consequently, Co. D 
has a fight. (Snow-ball fight.) 

Read " Undergraduate Life at Oxford " 
in February Outing. It gives a very in- 
structive and pleasing description of stu- 
dent life at the great English University. 

We heard a man tell of freezing his ears 
and chilling his nose inside often minutes, 
and that same hour he crossed a river on a 
ferry-boat. Truth is stranger than fiction. 

Jan. 27. Prof. Fernald read a paper on 
the "Intelligence of Lower Animals" before 
the Natural History Society, which was 
followed by a short discussion and illustra- 
tions. 

'94 elected class officers as follows: Pres- 
ident, L. Manley ; vice-pres't T. S. Bacon ; 
sec, A. C. Curtis; treas., R. E. Smith ; 
class capt., J. E. Gifford ; base-ball capt., 
E. T. Dickinson ; historian, F. L. Green ; 
serg. at arms, E. L. Bourdman. 

The Natural History Society had a very 
interesting meeting last evening. Mr. F. 
H. Henderson read an able essay on the 
life of Audubon. This was followed bj- a 
lively discussion on the following question : 
Resolved, that the crow is a benefit to the 
the farmer. 



WANTED — A NAME. 

He cares not to know who wrote "Beautiful snow," 
Nor what may have caused him to do it ; 

With his ear in a sling, he desires but one thing 

The name of the rascal who threw it. 

— Washington Post. 
Next Saturday afternoon there will be 
an in door athletic meet, and several 
events will be contested for. It is open to 
all, and those wishing to enter will hand 
their names to some officer of tlie Athletic 
Association. The first and second places 
will be announced in the events. 

M. A. 0. BRASS BAND. 

Piccolo, J. A. Putnam ; clarionet, E. W. 
Morse ; B" cornets, M. H. Williams, H. C. 
West; E"" altos, solo C. H. Higgins ; 2nd 
H.B. Emerson; B" tenors, CM. Hub- 
bard, F. 0. Williams, W. Fletcher ; bari- 
tone, E. H. Lehnert (leader;) tuba, S. B. 
Marvin ; bass drum, H. D. Clark ; snare 
drum, L. F. Horner; cymbals, G. F. Cur- 
ley ; 14 pieces. 

A letter has just come to hand from the 
theological student in Japan which we have 
been aiding. His name is M. Sakata. 
He is attending the Dosliisa Scliool, and 
will graduate in '92. But for our timely 
aid he would have been obliged to leave 
the school and help his father, who was 
taken sick last fall and has been in a feeble 
condition for some time since. Mr. Sakata 
was baptized four years ago, and now he 
walks seven miles every Saturday night to 
Fushima, where he preaches every Sunday. 
All who wish to see the letter will find it at 
No. 7 South college. 

The schedule for the Junior reciations 
was changed last week, thereby giving 
them Thursday afternoon free, unless the 
drill is changed to Thursday. The follow- 
ing are the changes. 
8.30, Agriculture, M. T. 

Zoology, W. Th. F. 
9.30, Physics, M. W. Th. 

General History, T. 

Rhetoricals & Debate, F. 
10.30, Chemistry, M. W. Th. 

Physics, T. F. 
11.30 Chemistry M. W. Th. 
1.30-3.30, Chemistry, T. F. 

The program of the W. I. L. S. last 
Friday evening was as follows: Declama- 
tion by C. L. Brown '94 ; debate, question, 
"Resolved, the welfare of our country de- 
pends more upon the manufactories than 
upon its commerce and agriculture." Merits 
of the question and weight of argument 
decided in Negative. Extemporaneous 
speech, M. Ruggles. The program for 
next Friday evening is: Debate, question. 



70 



AGGIE LIFE. 



"Resolved that the order of Knights of 
Labor has benefited the laboring classes." 
Affirmative, A. E. Meleudy, R. E. Smith. 
Negative, G. F. Curley, E. L. Boardman. 
Declamation, W. C. Duffleld ; Reading, J. 
Baker ; essay, H. F. Staples. 



A CORRECTION. 

In the last issue was published an article 
on " Our College Publications," in which, 
we have since learned, there was an omis- 
sion. 

In 1884, W. A. Stearns, who was then 
Curator of the Museum, undertook the pub- 
lication of "The Bulletin of Massachusetts 
Natural History." This was expected to 
become a medium for publishing the results 
of research, classification, etc., in the mu- 
seum ; in addition it looked after the Nat- 
ural History Interests of the State, and in- 
vited contributions from the scientific 
world in general. A column or more of 
college items were given. It w^as a six- 
teen-page monthly and expired after the 
fourth issue. 

For this correction we are indebted to 
W. E. Stone, 82 Purdue Ave., La Fayette, 
Ind. 



OUR BRASS BAND. 

How many of us have heard it play? 
Not enough to mention. It is nobody's 
fault, nobody's loss, but your own. It has 
its regular meetings twice a week, and the 
doors are always left ajar for the benefit 
of those who wish to listen to its strains. 
Although the performers on the various in- 
struments seem to take a decided interest 
in the matter, appear persistent in their 
efforts to make the Band a credit to the in- 
stitution, yet the College as a whole is in- 
different to the subject. Now give the 
boys a little encouragement. Wliile you 
may not be competent to contribute to its 
welfare in the line of musical talent, you 
might, at least, honor them with your pres- 
ence once in awhile. Go once and, being 
surprised at tiie improvement they have 
made, you will be attracted thence as often 
as the meetings occur. 



PRAYER MEETING TOPICS. 

Feb. 12— What is it to be a Christian ? 
Luke 18:18-22; i Pet. 4:16 G. 

E. Taylor. 

Feb. 15 — Christian Service. Acts 9 : 6. 

F. S. Hoyt. 

Feb. 19— Power with God. Gen.h2 :24-32. 

E. A. Ilawkes. 
Feb. 22— The Believers Reward. Rev. 2 : 

10; Matt. 24:13; Jas. 1:12. 

W. H. Ranney. 



MAILS. 
Mail leaves college for P. O. at 1 p. m. 
and 7 p. m. on week days. On Sunday it 
leaves at 4-45 p. m. At the P. O. mails 
close as follows : 

Boston, 

7-45,8-30, 10-15 A.M. ; 4-00,6-45, 7-45 p.m. 

New York, Western and Southern States, 

7-45, 10-15 A. M. ; 4-00, 6-45, 7-45 p. m. 

Northampton, Springfield and Western 

Massachusetts, 

7-20, 10-15, 10-45 A. M. ; 6-45 p. m. 

Northern way, N. L. Northern, 

8-30 A. M. 

The treasurer will be at his office from 4 

to 5 p. M. on Saturdays throughout the 

term. 

The museum of natural history will be 
open to visitors from 1-30 to 3-30 each af- 
ternoon excepting Saturday and Sunday. 

The college library will be open from 2 
to 4 p. M. and from 6 to 8 p. m. each day, 
excepting Saturday and Sunday. On Sat- 
urday it will be open from 9 to 12 A. m. and 
from 2 to 4 p. m., and on Sunday from 2 
to 3 p. M. 

President Goodell will be at his office 
from 2 to 4 p. m. every afternoon except 
Saturday and Sunday. 

ALUMNI note's. 

F. F. Noyes '88, is now in the employ 
of Thomson-Houston Electric Co. at Atlan- 
ta, Ga. He has recently been employed 
in the construction of the Belt Line Elec- 
tric road in Savannah. 

Henry Chapin '81, has accepted the po- 
sition of teacher of Natural Sciences at 
the High School, Springfield, Mass. 

A. C. McCloud '90, is at home again for 
a few days. 

F. L. Taylor '90, who has recently been 
in the employ of the L. & W. R. R., Mid- 
dlesboro, Ky., is at home for a short time. 

A meeting of the M. A. C. clnb of New 
York will beheld at 313 West 54th St., 
Friday, Feb. 13, 1891, at 8 p. m. Topic, 
Shall the Standard of Admission to the 
Mass. Agr'l College be raised? 

J. M. Herrero '90, left Amherst, Feb. 2, 
for his home in Cuba. 

Last week Tuesday, F. S. Cooley '88 
read a paper on "Scientific Rations in 
Stock Feeding," before the Sunderland 
farmers. 

Clinton S. Howe, '87, has been elected 
Master of the Marlborough Grange. 

Chas. L. Marshall, '87, of Lowell, has 
been elected a Trustee of the Middlesex 
North Agricultural Society. 





Business is bub uss. i'liANK WOOD will get up 
Spread's for the Boys this winter. Send your order« 
right along to get there first. 

BO"yS 

Do you want a nice warm Ulster? 

A Toboggan Tuque to wear skat- 
ing or sleighing? 

If so call on us. 

We have some dandy Black 
Cheviot Suits. We have a big 
trade at your college and use the 
boys right. 

BLOD&ET'P ^ 8Mf(K 

.JOHN MULLEN, 

DEALER IN 

MEATS and PROVISIONS, 

VEGETABLES OF ALL KINDS IN SEASON, 

FISH AND OYSTERS, FOREIGN 

AND DOMESTIC FRUITS, 

AND CANNED 

GOODS. 

Palmer's Block, Main Street. 



E. R. BENNETT, 
Jew^eler, 

Optician, 

Watchmaker. 

FINE GOODS! LOW PRICES! 

GOOD WORK WARRANTED. 

First Door from Post Office. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



71 



IF YOU WANT TO GET OYSTERS IN ANY 
STYLE GO TO 

E. B. ARNOLD'S 

students are atteoded at short ootice. 



Open all clays of the week until 12 o'clock. 
Sundays from 9 a. m. to 12-30 P. M.. and from 
7 p. M. to 11 P. M. 

William's Block, Merchants' Row. 



The title page of this book was drawn and engraved by 

John S*"»'i'Sj 

6 Davis Street, BOSTON, MASS. 

The various publications of Bates, Bowdoin, Colby, 
Tufts, Mass. Agricultural College, Wellesly and Yale 
have used his work. He wili submit sketches and cari- 
catures for your approval. 



OFFICE OF 



EDWARD A. THOMAS, 

Fii|E/\D Life IfURANCE jIge^t, 

REAi ESTATE EOR SALE AND TO LET. 
Office, Cooks Block, Jitnherst, Mass. 



GEO. GRAVES, 

DE.\LER IN 

Painters' Supplies 



Personal attention given to Frescoing, Dec- 
orating and Paper Hanging, and all 
Interior and Exterior 
House Painting. 

Pleasant St., near L, J. Spear's Shop. 



AMHERST COLLEGE 

CO-OPmilVE 8TM LAUNORy 

and Carpet Renovaving Establisliment, 



Aggie Agent, H. M. HOWARD, 91. 



Work taken Monday delivered Wednesday. 
" " Wednesday delivered Saturday. 

SA.TISr.A.CTI01Sr 0-XT.A.E.A.]SrTEBI3. 

OFFICE AT BRINE'S. 

H. A. UTLEY, Manager. 



STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE. 

Secretary's Report. 

Boston, Feb. 7, 1891. 

The annual meeting of the State Board 
of Agriculture was held in the office of the 
Secretary, at Boston, Feb. 3, 4 and 5. 

The matters of business transacted that 
relate moie or less directl}- to the College, 
were as follows : 

Hon. George S. Taylor of Chicopee, for 
the Examining Committee of the Agricul- 
tural College, reported on the College. 
Voted, to accept and adopt the Report as 
the Report of the Board of Agriculture to 
the Legislature. 

Dr. VVm. Holbrook of Palmer, and Chas. 
A. Stills of South Williamstown were 
elected members of the Examining Com- 
mittee of the Agricultural College. The 
full committee for 1891 is as follows ; 

Prof. N. S. Shaler of Cambridge, A. C. 
Varnum, Esq., of Lowell, George Cruik- 
shanks of Fitchburg, P. M. Harwood of 
Barre (M. A. C. '75), Dr. Wm. Holbrook 
of Palmer, and Chas. A. Mills of South 
Williamstown. 

C. L. Hartshorn of Worcester was elect- 
ed a member of the Board of Control of 
the State Agricultural Experiment Station, 
vice W. W. Rawson of Arlington, whose 
term had expired ; and D. A. Horton of 
Northampton was elected to fill out the un- 
expired term of P. M. Harwood (M. A. 
C. '75), of Barre, who resigned from the 
Board of Control. 

Hon. Wm. R. Sessions of Hampden was 
unanimously re-elected Secretary of the 
Board. 



R. S. V. P. 

Now what In thunder could I say? 
It happened somewhat in this way. 
It was the first call I had made, 
And yet she didn't seem afraid 
To sit beside me in a nook 
And gaze upon a picture book. 
And so some impulse made me haste 
To slip my arm around her waist. 
She seemed to like it pretty well. 
Just how and why I couldn't tell. 
But soon she brushed aside a curl 
And said, "I'll bet no other girl 
When first you called upon the miss. 
Has ever acted just like this." 
I smiled, and tried to look quite gay, 
But what in thunder could I say? 

Brunonian. 

J. R. 

Well, what in thunder did j'ou do.' 
Poor boy! you must be awful "new." 
You say your arm was 'round her waist. 
Yet you forebore her lips to taste. 
"No other girl e'er acted just like this," 
An invitation plain to take a kiss ! 



Do laws in your small state hold sway, 

Framed in stern Puritanic day, 

"Fine, £s5, or stocks' irapiisonment 

For kissing maid without ner pa's consent" ? 

To duty's call you were remiss 

Unless you took the profi"ered kiss. 

Think how that moment you'd regret 

If such a chance you ne'er again should get. 

When next you hug a girl and she acts so, 

Just osculate, and let the talking go. 

A. G. E. 



TEMPUS FUGIT. 

Yes, that is a fact. Time flies. Why? 
For the same reason that a cow gives milk, 
because it is built that waj-. It always has, 
and always will, to the end of existence. 
Ever since its creation this earth of ours 
has tumbled over itself once every twenty- 
four hours, and swings round the sun once 
in three hundred and sixty-five days. How 
long this process will continue no one 
knows. How long it has continued, not 
even the most learned expounder of zero 
and infinity can calculate. 

Time is queer stuff", anyway. Webster 
gives the following very instructive defini- 
tions : 

" Time, A period of duration." 
^'Duration, Continuance in time." 
The man who wrote the above was cer- 
tainly a genius. Not every one would have 
stopped there, but would have worked it 
out by an elaborate application of formulae 
and theoretical analysis, aud then written 
a book about it, entitled "Theorj- of Inde- 
finite Duration." But, although we may 
not be able to describe time to our satis- 
faction, we can certainly watch its efl'ect 
on ourselves and those about us. Shakes- 
peare says : 

"Come what come may. 
Time and the hour run through the roughest 

day." 
Well, that is about so. Shakespeare pro- 
bably got his idea from experience and that 
is a dear school, we are told. Every man 
deals with his time in his own way, but 
however that may be, time goes right along 
aud gets there, and it is the man's own 
lookout as to whether or not he keeps up. 
There are a great mauy mortals in this 
world who are behind baud. Just a little, 
perhaps, but that little gets bigger and in- 
creases by geometrical progression until all 
chance of catching up is lost, and the vic- 
tim falls into ignominy or something worse. 
That's the way a grent many people live 
and die, but is it the right way? Oh ! no, 
surely not ! 

Then there is the man who is continually 
talking about killing time. Now that is a 
sad position for a human being to be in. 



72, 



AGGIE LIFE. 



He does not care. He is in no more haste to 
reach his destination than that mixed train 
from "Hamp." He slips through the world 
like Pelham water through a sieve, and 
with just about the same effect, for all the 
solid matter is sifted out of him, and he 
suddenly finds himself nothing in nowhere, 
with time clear out of sight in the distance. 
The man who writes in his diary: "Got 
up. Washed. Went to bed," just to kill 
time, is no good. 

Then we have the man who keeps time. 
He is a queer specimen. Can yon not 
imagijie him wandering around with a 
Waterbury chronometer in his hand, keep- 
ing time? He is on time, always. He has 
a time for everything and everything in its 
time. He is just on time. All his up- 
risings and down-sittings are governed by 
his time. Does he keep time? Oh! no, 
time keeps him ! 

But we cannot stop to ponder on the re- 
lation of time to humanity at large, but will 
bring it into the college world. Here we 
have time just as raucii as anywhere else. 
One month of this new year has come into 
view, passed, and disappeared. What has 
it left us? Have we profited by it? These 
are sober questions and should receive 
sober consideration. 

The following account, evidently kept 
by a Freshman, may throw light on the 
question. 

Time. Dr. 

To college expenses for one month, 
(Hash, Extract of Pelham, 
Rent, Wash, Coal, Tax fiend, 
etc.), 25.00 

Luxuries, (cand}', .01, gum, .03) .04 



Total expense, 
Time. Cr. 

By Expansive force of Nitro Gh'cer- 

iue and Properties of Gun- 
powder, 

No. bushels cabbages raised in 
United States, (per acre). 

Beautifully wrought algebraic 
curves and properties of 0, 

HgS, (odor free) with Sulphuric 
Acid) , 

Irony, CHmax, Hyperbole, Synec- 
doche, Antithesis, 

Lochinvar, (10^ inches). 

Snow Bound, (10 lines). 

Drawing, (1 wash tub, one kettle, 
1 ladle, 6 wine glasses), 

Moneo, Audio, Audax, Puella 
maxima, etc.. 



25.04 



1.00 
.01 

1.20 

.25 

.75 

1.00 

.01 

.50 

1.00 



Total value knowledge gained, 5.72 
Total Expense, 25.04 

Net Profit, 19.32 



As minus dollars, like Canada pieces, 
don't pass at the IVI. A. C, the above ac- 
count looks a little dubious, but we must 
not be discouraged by it. Perhaps our ac- 
countant was not fair in his estimation of 
the value of the knowledge of Uncle Sam's 
cabbage crop. Perhaps he may make a 
fortune out of that very information. The 
history of the world has turned on a smaller 
thing than a cabbage ! Perhaps he can also 
be condemned for his low estimation of that 
soul bestirring piece " Lochinvar." Why, 
it is enough to make the oak knots in the 
Chapel ceiling grin to hear the renderings 
of that selection ! 

Do not then be discouraged, but throw 
all your energies into your work. Don't 
be afraid of time, but stand up and grapple 
with it. Grab it by the forelock, if it has 
any. If not, any part of its auatomy will 
do, but grab it, hang to it, and make the 
most of it. That is the way to make col- 
lege life a success ! 

C. F. W. 



OTHER COLLEGES. 

Canada has forty colleges. 

Tiiree-filtlis of the Faculty of Harvard 
have voted in favor of a three years course. 

Ten per cent, of Cornell's graduates last 
year were ladies and they carried off sixty 
per cent, of the honors. 

Princeton college has received a gift of 
over 30,000 pieces of pottery and porcelain 
illustrating the history and progress of art 
from the earliest Egyptian period down to 
the present time. 

Amherst college has received a gift of 
$100,000 to be added to the general en- 
dowment fund. 

William G. Ballantine, D. D., Professor 
of Old Testament language and literature 
at Oberlin, has been elected Presideut of 
that college. 

Austin Scott, Ph. D., was inaugurated 
President of Rutgers, Feb. 4. 

Th ? National University of Tokio, Japan 
has 20,000 students. 

The course in journalism at Cornell, 
formerly given, has been dropped. 

A $250,000 hall is to be given to Prince- 
ton by Mrs. Harriet C. Alexander. 

Austin College, Sherman, Texas, has 
received a bequest of $75,000 from the 
widow of Rev. Donald McGregor, D. D. 

A class paper is to be published by '93 
of Boston College. 

"The Willistouian" has changed its form. 

The Trustees of the New Hampshire 
Agricultural College at Hanover, voted re- 
cently to admit female students at the in- 
stitution, and three enteiprisiug misses 
have alread\' signified their intention of 
entering next fall. 

Allegheny college has a young ladies 
base- ball club. 



E, B, DISKIIJSOI], D, D, S, 



KELLOGG'S BLOCK, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Office Hours, 9 to 12 a. m., 1-30 to 5 p. m. 



«S-Ether and Nitrous Oxide Gas administered when 
desired. 



A.T TJSrB 



JIMHEBSTCASH SHOE STORE, 

You can get tlie most for your money. 
BOOTS AND SHOES, RUBBERS, OVER- 
SHOES, SLIPPERS, TRUNKS, 
AND BAGS. 



REPAIRIN G NEAT LY DONE. 
HAWES & STINSON, 

CASH ROW, AMHERST, MASS. 



AMHERST HOUSE 



L1YERY,EEED,7\ND SALE STABLE. 



T, L PAIGE, Prop'r. 



HACKS TO AND FROM ALL TRAINS, OM- 
NIBUSES, HACKS, DOUBLE AND 
SINGLE TEAMS FURNISHED 
AT SHORT NOTICE. 
CAREFUL DRIVERS. FAIR PRICES. 

AMBEKST, MASS. 



Sheet Music. 



St lying's 

van THE VIOLIN, BANJO, GUITAR, 

Ciishman's Music Store, 



jft.Tv/EI3 3EH.ST. 



J, M, WAITE k SON, 



AND BEALURS IN 



Hals, Caps. Furs, Trunks, Bags, Furnisliii Goods. 

[>:it('st StyU's ill Furnishiugs. vVgent for 

Knox's and Youinaii's Plats. Solo 

Agent for Pittsfield 

Lanndi'j'. 

H./\Ts Repaired. Furs Renovated 

Give us a call be lore purcliasing. 

^'(>. n I'Hmyix now, AMWEitsr, mjlSS. 



%mhtxBt MouBt, 



'J 

AMHERST, MAS.S. 



The nudersigned- is pleased to announce 
to his former patrons and others desiring 
Game Spreads or Dinners, that he is alwiiys 
prepared to accomodate (at siiort notice) 
large or small parties. 

Ample dining room capacitj' for "200 peo- 



.ORENZO CHASE, Prop'R, 



..g^ppJNTTSTS,,^,. 

C. S. GATES, D. D. S. 
T. G. HUNTINGTOI^, D. D. S. 

CVTLElt'S liJA>CIi, AMJBEltST, MASS. 



r)OWBS ^ I^EIjLOGG, 



DKALER.S IN 



-hx- 



STUDEpg SUPPLIES'^ 



FANCY GROCKEIES, CROCKERY, CIGARS, 

CIGARETTES, TOBACCO. FRUITS 

ANP CONFECTIONERY, 

LftlQP' gpODS ftlJD KE]^OgEI]E OIL, 

SDoor.i South of f. O., - AMHERST, MASS. 



EDWIN NELSON, 

Books and Stationery, 

Next door to Post Offlce* 
AMHERST, MASS. 



\A^OOD'S HOUSE 

ffftlJ^ DKEgSII^g EOOITJS, 

Razors Honed and Shears Sharpened at 
short notice.. 

AMIIER.ST, MASS. 



V.H. KENFTELD, 

-»JEWELB.P^,"^ 



It'nnil'K lilorl.-. 



Anthi'vst, Mtfss. 



SPECIAL. 



A Stem Wind and .Sot Wnltli.Tiii, IlMiiipileii, l';ii;ii\ ov II 
iinois niovcniciit in a (iolil Filled (Jiise lor §l.').UO. 



Umbrellas covered while you wait, also dealer 
ill Gmis, Rifles, Ammunition and Sporting Goods 
of all lands. Amateur I'liotographie Outlits and 
Supplies. Views and I'ictiires taken wlien de- 
sired. Views of Amherst and Vicinity for sale.. 
Call and see b 'fore purchasin.s)- elsewhere. 

/srWATCH AND CLOCK REPAIRING A SPECIALTY..JBO 



OFFICE HOURS: 
G A.. ]Vr. TO 5 F. JVC. 

Ethc'r and Nitrous Oxide administered wheir 
desired. 



J. L. LOVEI.L, 

DRV PLATES, COMPOUND DEVELOPER 

AND SENSITIZED PAPER. READY 

FOR USE. 



%. 



H.O. P 



H 



H 



Maijt Tailor, 



.A^aS/arxiEK-s T , 



DvI-A^SS. 



(J. fl. I^AWSON, 



DEALKl! IN 



WSTSHES, «IiO0K2, JEWELRY 

FINE POCKET CUTLERY, SILVER ANU 

PLATED WARE, OPTICAL GOODS 

CANES, SPORTING AND 

FANCY GOODS, 

Gold Pens, Fine Stationery 



REPARING NEATLY and PROMPTLY DONE. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



DWIGHfP GQOOI^E, 



PRINTING FOR AMATEURS 



Done in the best manner. 



BILLIA RD AND POO L 

3 y/liinix Ttuir (irp-striirs ), 
AMHERST, MASS, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Massachusetts Agricultural College, 




A-natierst, IMa^sss. 



-^ - h: 



-X^" 




VOL. I. 



AMHERST, MASS., FEBRUARY 25, 1891. 



NO. 10. 



C, H, SANDERSON & CO., ^ WHERE DO YOU M m\ 



k 



I 



CASH DEALKKS IN 






PRINTERS,* 

AMHERST, - - MASS. 



Hat?, Caps, Umbrellas, "and Gents' 
Furnishing Goods. 



Mass. 



LTURAL College, 



CASH HOW, 



AMHERST. 



Botanical Department, 

AMHEE.ST, MASS. 

We would inform the friends of the college, 
and the public generally, that we are prepared 
to supply 

FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND 

SHRUBS. .SMALL FRUITS AND 

PLANTS, 

true to name, also 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

all at the lowest price. 

For Trees,. Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and Small 
Fruits, address. 



■ Sy\NDE[|S0H & Thompson. 

r*SIl IJEAt.EUS IX 

Dry and Fancy Goods, 



Meerschaum Pipes? 
French Briar Pipes'/ 
Clioice Tobacco? 
Sponges? 
Soap? 

Hair Brushes from 25 cts. up? 
Combs from 5 cts. up? 
Choice New York Confectionery? 
Shaving Mugs? 
Shaving S-oap? % 

Lather Bru.shes? 

Cigarettes, fresh every two weeks? 
The Best Soda in America?- 
The Best Bay Rum? 
Imported Perfumes? 
Prescriptions prepared liy licensed pharmacists? 
Imported Domestic Tooth Brushes? 

If yon have not obt.ained these necessaries at 
DEUEL'S DRUG STORE, you have begun 
wrong. Deuel's is the leading Drug Store in 
Western Mass., and keeps the largest assort- 
ment of goods at bottom prices. 



HOSIERY, RIBBONS, 'AND SMALL 
WARES OF ALL KINDS, 



n 



Prof. S, T. Maynard, 



AMHERST. MASS. 



AMHERST. MASS 



THE AMHERST 



J^^ 



BOOTS@SHOES 

FOR EVERYBODY. 



EL'S DRUt STORt 

Amherst House Block, Amiierst, lass, 
HENRY ADAMS, 

PHARMACIST, 



NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



FURNITURE >ND CARPET- STORE. 



A complete line of goods suited to the students' 
wants. 

BEDSTEADS. MATTRESSES. PILLOWS, 

S TUDY DESKS AND CHAIRS , 

LOUNGES 



WINDOW SHADES, DRAPERIES, 

CARPETS, RUGS, ETC., ETC., 



All (foods Strictly Cash and at Lowest lances. 



E. D. MARSH, 



10 PHCENIXiKOW, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



.\ FtXE i-INE OP STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES. IN PATENT LEATHER, 
BALS. AND CONGRESS. 

A FULL LIXE Off 

E-TTBBBI?. GOOr>S, 

KOOT-RALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 

Repairing Done Promptly. 

T. V\^. SLOAN, 
■J j'jrcEXix jioiv. 



S, J, SULLIVAN, . 



.lEALEU IX 



Second-Hand Clothes 

AND 

FUHNITUEj:. 

iy^Orders promptly attended to.^^i 
I'. 0. Box, 319 AMHERST, MASS. 



Pure DlTios and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORT- 

. ED AND DOMESTIC CIGARS, 

CIGARETTES, ETC., 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, 

FISHING TACKLE AND SPORTING GOODS, 

Metallic Cai'tvidges for Pistols, and Sporting 
and Springfield Rifles. 

Sunday and night calls responded to at resi- 
dence, first door west ot Wood's Hotel. 

^rugs, Medicines, 

TOILET ARTICLES, 

CONFECTIONERY, CIGARS, CIGARETTES 

AND SMOKERS' GOODS. 



rnrsicrAxs' i^ni scjiirrioys caick- 
FUj.iyr cosiL-oirNDED, 



R 1>IICENIX ROW. 

Order vour CJOA3L bere. 



VOL. I. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



AMHERST, MA.SS., FEBRUARY 25, 1891. 



No. 10 



THE SPIRIT OF NEW ENGLAND. 

All hail to old New England, 

Land of the brave and fair, 

The essence of heroic deeds 

Is in thy mountain air. 

Since Mary Chilton's foot iirst pressed 

That rock with memories old, 

New England's daughters have been fair, 

Her sons have all been bold. 

Upon our rugged hills and dales 

A rugged race has grow n : 

Who took of life the better part, 

And claimed it for their own. 

Let Southern plains of cotton boast, 

'the West of golden glen : 

The product of New England's hills, 

Has been a race of men. 

Fast spreading toward the setting sun. 
New England's sons have pressed, 
Fast breaking with the gleaming plow. 
The wide plains of the West. 
Behind them spring the cities up 
Where forests once did stand, 
The fertile plains all smile with grain, 
Beneath each sturdy hand. 

Thus to the West, and South, and North, 

A steady current flows ; 

Making the desert, wild and drear, 

To blossom like the rose. 

In every little frontier town, 

New England's homes now stand ; 

Whose influence for good is great, 

A strong force in the land. 

But not alone in peaceful times. 
New England's strengh is shown. 
Her sous have always foremost been. 
When battle winds have blown. 
Her's was the band at Lexington, 
That Freedom's flag unfurled ; 
Her's was the shot at Concord bridge. 
That echoed round the world. 

When traitors sought to wreck the State, 
And o'er the stripes and stars, 
Set blofidy treason's horrid sign. 
The flaunting stars and bars. 
Her sons were first in Freedom's cause, 
Their heart's best blood to shed. 
When the gray stones of Baltimore 
Were dyed a vivid red. 

Wherever blows for truth are struck 
And wrong goes crashing down, 
Whether upon the far frontier. 
Or in the crowded town ; 
New England's sons are always there, 
Ready to dare and do. 
The spirit of New England 
To right is ever true. 



Then hail to old New England, 

Mother to heroes dead. 

The glories of two hundred years 

Are clustered round her head. 

Our's is the sacred trust to guard 

Those glories of past time. 

And make New England's spirit felt, 

In every land and clime. 

H. N. 



PHYSICAL p:xercises. 

"Ask what thou lackest; thought resigned. 

A healthy frame, a quiet mind." 

Tennyfon. 

Tile imporlance of taking a suitable 
amount of exercise daily cannot be emplia- 
sized too strongly during these long winter 
months, for sports are at a stanilstiil, tlie 
ground is deeply covered wilh snow, and 
tiie average student is ver3- liable to over- 
look the opportunities that tend to develop 
him physically. The winter term is con- 
ceded by all to be the term for study. 
The faithful student has much mental labor 
to perform in order to reach the desired 
results, and he may very naturally overlook 
the importance of this exercise, but nothing 
contributes more to our physical health 
than the proper amount of daily exercise, 
and while we are here in college preparing 
for our future work, it is the duty of every 
one of us to give this matter our closest 
attention, to see if we are developing our- 
selves physically, as well as intellectually, 
for these must go hand in hand for the 
successful termination of a college course. 
What a sad sight it is to see a young man 
go out from an institution of learning, with 
a pallid countenance and a poorly developed 
figure showing the result of his confinement, 
and enter into some indoor profession 
which will be a repetition of his life in col- 
lege ; the result is that this young man's 
health is ruined in a short time, and he is 
obliged to seek some outdoor employment, 
and light here perhaps the plans of his life 
are frustrated and he will begin to realize 
for the first time in his life, that he has 
made a mistake, but alas, it is too late. 
Now this college may be an exception, for 
a great many of our students are engaged in 
manual labor of some kind, and in addition 
to these we have quite a large number of 
men in training for base-ball and general 
athletics. These without doubt obtain the 
requisite amount of exercise but there is a 



certain class of men here who have plenty of 
spare time during the day which they do not 
improve, for after recitations they are con- 
tent to idle away the greater part of their 
time indulging in a social game of cards, or 
perhaps sleeping off the effects of some dis- 
sipation the previous night, never for a 
moment realizing that it is detrimental to 
them, for they lie dormant as it were during 
the winter, awaiting with pleasure perhaps 
the opening of spring, when they can again 
take their respective positions in athletics. 
These are the men who would be greatly 
benefited by taking daily exercise. Again 
there are those men who can scarcely find 
time for study, they are constantly in a 
hurry and even begrudge the time they 
spend in drilling. Let us investigate their 
case more closely that we may judge more 
intelligently of their exact position, and 
perhaps we cannot do it better than to pay 
a visit to these unfortunates. Here we find 
one sitting beside a hot coal fire, his room 
has not been ventilated since last inspec- 
tion, and the odors of a lamp that has not 
been cleaned since it was bought, pervade 
the air. No wonder he cannot study, the 
confinement has had its effect upon him. 
Why cannot some one communicate the 
fact to him that a few minutes spent in 
exercise will bring health and vigor to him ; 
his dull brain will regain consciousness, 
and he will return to his books a new man. 
He will be able to study more intelligently, 
for his mental faculties will be increased ; 
his studies assume a new degree of interest, 
and the physical condition of his body will 
be greatly benefited. These may be rather 
extraordinary cases, but there are men in 
our college placed in this very same pre- 
dicament, and they do not realize it now, 
but sooner or later the truth will dawn 
upon them. Fellow Students: This is the 
term for study, do not neglect it, but give 
your personal attention to this matter of 
daily exercise, and make it a point to 
intermingle with your intellectual exercise, 
physical exercise, for in later years yon 
will reap the benefits of it, and farther, 
remember that our future career after leav- 
ing college depends directly upon our phys- 
ical condition, for without good health our 
prospects in life are ruined. We can do 
nothing, and what is a man worth, no mat- 
ter how highly developed his mind may be, 



74 



AGGIE LIFE. 



if he has a weak constitution? Let us 
think of tills, for as Covvper sajs : 
The joy, the danger, and the toil o'erpays. 
'Tis exercise, and health, and length of days. 

H. E. C. 



uergy of purpose if we would mount a 
round higher in life than our fellow beings. 

T. F. K. 



SUCCESS. 

There is, doubtless, no student in our 
college who does not have in view some 
magnificent fortune or some honorable ca- 
reer. Every man probably has an idea 
that he is bound to be great, and make his 
mark in this world. But what kind of a 
mark it will be, depends wlioily upon the 
person making it. Some make long flash- 
ing marks, otiiers small faint ones, and 
still others, like the youths who have their 
names scrawled on the walls of a country 
school, will only succeed in making a few 
faint pencil marks wliicli are easily effaced 
when the whitewash is applied. 

Now we can form a vevy fair estimate of 
what the success of any one will be by 
noticing their traits of character in youth. 
The student who goes over his lessons in a 
shiftless, careless manner, with no special 
effort or ambition, can be set down as one 
whose success in after life will correspond 
to that of his college days. 

The various habits, both good and bad, ^ 
which are cultivated in our youth, greatly 
affect the condition of our welfare in our 
maturing years. Habits of indulgence, ex- 
travagance, and carelessness will often 
destroy a man who is otherwise good, while 
economy, diligence and perseverance will 
aid very materially in all branches of life's 
work. 

Perhaps one may inquire, '-What are the 
essential points of pure success?" One of 
our noted men remarked, when asked to 
give a maxim to a young man entering into 
a business life : "Don't look at the clock," 
and there is a vast amount of sense in that ; 
for he who is fearful of working overtime, 
will, indeed, have a hard task, to carve out 
an illustrious destiny for himself. 

But in order to bring the idea of success 
nearer home, we might incidentally mention 
the coming Prize Drill. Now, no one 
surely will grow two inches taller because 
of his victory if he doesn't try to gain the 
prize. And the one that does win will cer- 
tainly be one who has spent time, labor, 
and interest upon his work. 

The youth who, when asked how to rise 
in the world, answered, "sit on a pin," ex- 
pressed a truth which is quite pointed. We 
must liave some impelling principle urging 
us to rise, some activity in starting, some 



reminisci^:nces of an alumnus. 

The undergraduates of the present day 
have much to be thankful for in the pres- 
ent thriving condition of the Mass. Agri- 
cultural College. To be sure, we are a 
progressive people, and in the nature of 
events, are never quite satisfied with things 
as they are. Yet the students of 12 years 
ago worked for honor and slieepskin amid 
the turmoil of administration changes, with 
cramped accommodations, and limited a|)- 
paiatus and equipment. TJie drill hall, 
experiment station buildings, stone' chapel 
and President's house were not even then 
on paper. The scene over the college 
grounds from the summit of Mount Pleas- 
ant was beautiful then, but It Is more beau- 
tiful now. 

The college library was located In the 
north-west corner of North College, on the 
first floor. A few shelves in the main 
room held all the books, while a much 
smaller room contained the W. L L. S. 
library, and a few bundles of miscellane- 
ous magazines. From time to time one 
might secure a book from this room from 
the so-called librarian, but not infrequent- 
ly it was necessary to crawl through a 
window around on the back side. As the 
librarian also sold stationery and enter- 
tained his friends here, this Important de- 
partment of college instruction did not 
grow with amazing rapidity. 



The students' reading room occupied a 
north-west room on the first floor of the 
old South College, that building dear to 
the hearts of many of the older boys. Each 
year, after the subscriptions were sent In, 
the boys would gather of an appointed 
night, in Prof. Goodell's lecture room and 
the periodicals would be bid off at auction. 
Possibly the same practice Is in vogue now. 
This was alwaj's a racy affair, and often 
the biter was bit. I have in mind one 
occasion when Boynlon, '81, (who is now 
out in Red Gulch, Wyoming, removing the 
various Ills to which human flesh is lieir) 
in Ills exuberance of spirits, bid 7.5 cents 
as a starter, on a 50 cent-regular-subscrip- 
tion-brand-new-periodlcal, that nobody 
else seemed to want, for the third and last 
call was made on that bid. 



The college farm has passed through 
many changes during the past 15 years, 
both in manaoement and buildings. In the 



fall of 1878, in order to reduce expenses 
and increase the contents of a starving 
treasury, a herd of unusual good thorough- 
bred Shorthorns was sold at auction, the 
sale being extensively advertised, and a 
Boston auctioneer oflSclating. There were 
many disappointed that these excellent 
Shorthorns should be sold, and I remem- 
ber that on the bottom of the placard adver- 
tising the sale, Prof. Stockbrldge had Writ- 
ten, "And the mourners go about the 
stre cts," and hung it on his door, in the 
old study In the rear end of the woodshed, 
upstairs, In what was the old farm house 
near the Durfee plant house. These Short- 
horns were of the milking class, and gave 
heavy yields of milk. 



Among the characters that have not pas- 
sed out of the minds of many of the old 
boys, is "KaUte" Hubbard, of Sunderland, 
of water melon fame. Each fall his wagon 
load of melons was watched for with great 
interest. One day '82 was returning from 
the Botanic Museum to the dormitories, 
when "Kalite" came along on the country 
road with a wagon full of melons just as 
about a sc!>reof the class reached the road. 
While surrounding the wagon, thoughtfMlly 
thumping and testing for ripeness, with the 
Yankee driver on the seat watching \vlth 
eagle eye the every motion of his custom- 
ers (?), we heard hurrying footsteps and 
turned to see M — ■ (he claims to be an ag- 
ricultural editor now) appear on the scene, 
seize a big melon, and rush off down the 
hill with it so rapidly as to fairly bewilder 
us. It was the only melon bought that 
day, and that was sold at a loss, and those 
who ate of it claim it was green. But H. 
M. wasn't. 



One of the features of the first ten years 
of the existence of the college, was com- 
pulsory class work In the field. Of course 
if students were sick they were excused, 
but as a general rule the boys just doted on 
that work, if they couldn't get out of it. 
After dinner, the class would assemble 
under the North College, about four hours 
per week, and get tools, and start for the 
field ready for the fray. One entire fall 
'82 spent in grubbing stumps ont of eight 
or ten acres of land at the foot of the slope 
on the west side of the buildings. The 
only recompense we could ever get for that 
beautiful aud valuable piece of work, was 
to borrow grapes of Parsons In the green- 
house, while he sorted from a long tray 
before him. but those of us who got caught 
didn't have so large a profit on the balance 
sheet. LuDDT. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



75 



FRKSENCE OF MIND. 

You have doubtless read of Carl and 
Fiitz wlio were engaged in decoratiug the 
walls of an ancient cathedral. They liad 
slung n|) a platfoiin at some distance from 
the floor and Carl was giving the finishing 
touches to his picture of Pharoah's daugh- 
ter finding Moses iu the bulrushes. Frilz 
stood by his side. Carl stepped back to 
admire his work, unconscious of the dan- 
ger behind him. Another step and he must 
go backward to the floor some seventy feet 
below. Fritz saw the danger and knowing 
that words would avail nothing, hurled his 
brush at the painting, exclaiming, " that 
for your picture ! " Carl sprang forward, 
too late to save his painting, but in time to 
save himself from a certain death. 

Fritz exhibited what is commonly known 
as presence of mind. His decision and 
action were instantaneous. Hs saw what 
must be done to save Carl's life and did it 
at once. It is easy to see how the pres- 
ence of mind is essential to saving life ; it 
is just as essential to success in any under- 
taking. He who has his thoughts about 
him and is both quick and sane iu his deci- 
sions will have such confidence in his judg- 
ment as vrill stimulate him to determined, 
energetic action. 

Unfailing presence of mind has been ad- 
mired in army and iu civil life. The pos- 
session of it has made men the idols of 
society. It is universally recognized and 
admired by all. 

It was this characteristic of Henry Clay 
that made him popular and gave him power 
to command, even in moments of political 
excitement. From the record of his life, I 
am sure, that to him periods of mental 
vacuity came seldom and never lasted long. 

This power to do the right thing at the 
right time ; to make the witty remark, and 
courteous reply ; and to have the first 
thoughts the clearest and best is the power 
which wins admiration and respect for the 
possessor. Who would not like such a 
power? It may be had by acquiring habits 
of strict attention to what one is doing. In 
the class-room, on the campus, at drill, or 
at work this power may be acquired by 
banishing periods of mental inertia aud 
being on the lookout for what is coming 
next, without forgetting what the present 
duty is. 

Presence of mind shows itself in every 
expression and every act. It is seen in the 
face and gives to it a gentler expression, 
no matter how harsh the outline. The ex- 
pression is an index of the mind and tells 
us when it is active. It is easy enough to 



tell by a man's expression whether he 
knows what and why he is doing. The 
eye is but "the window to the soul." 

How to acquire and preserve this valua- 
ble quality is worthy of honest endeavors. 
Gain it through attention and keep it by 
using. In use it grows stronger. 

H. M. H. 



OUR UNIFORM. 

The first uniforui worn at college was 
simply a blue flannel blouse, having the 
letters M. A. C. upon a blue shield on the 
breast. This was worn like a shirt, inside 
the pants. At first any black or blue 
pants were worn, but soon a dark blue pant 
was introduced. Maj. Henry E. Alvord 
was the first Prof, of Military Science. 
In April, 1872, Lieut. A. H. Merrill, 1st 
Lieut. 1st Artillery, U. S. A., was detailed 
as instructor in Military Science. He im- 
mediately introduced white belts, white 
gloves and "dress hats," the latter of white 
panama, and organized the battalion into 
four companies designated the M. A. Ca- 
dets. The battalion remained in four com- 
panies until '78 when Lieut. Morris reduced 
the number to three. From Lieut. Merrill's 
first report I take the following, as it shows 
the condition of the uniform at that time : 
"The onl}' defect in the equipment of this 
department of the college is the want of a j 
suitable dress coat. The uniform of the ! 
battalion as it now is would be complete if 
this were added. The dress hats, belts 
and gloves obtained since April last are 
just those to go with the finest uniform, and 
the coat the cadets have is only a loose, 
ill-shaped, flannel shirt which has to be 
worn inside the trousers and presents any- 
thing but a pleasing or military appearance. 
A 'coat equal to those worn by any military 
organization in the U. S. can be obtained 
for $30, and one such coat would last a 
cadet during the four years' course." He 
further reccomends that the college appro- 
priate something to assist the students 
already iu college to purchase these coats. 

As a result of these reccomendations of 
Lieut. IMerrill, in the spring of '75, just 
after his place had been filled b}' Lieut. 
Tottten, the college adopted as the uniform 
the old gray pants, cap and dress coat. 

Lieut. Bridgman says in hisreportof '82 
"A jacket allowing more freedom of the 
upper portions of tlie body in mortar and 
artillery drill is desirable. This can be 
introduced still keeping within the pre- 
scribed cost of the military outfit and it 
would be generally wore at all times." 

The blouse was probably introduced 



soon after this. In '88, just before the 
entrance of the present Junior class the 
Trustees voted to do away with the dress 
coat. Lieut. Cornish tried a year ago to 
have the dress coat reinstated. A petition 
asking to have it reinstated was circulated 
among the students but did not receive 
hearty support. 

Perhaps you wonder when those "Coal 
hods" over in the armory ■were worn. I 
am unable to give the exact dates when 
they were introduced but it was probably 
soon after the gray uniform. They were 
only worn on dress parade and battalion 
drill. At first the students liought them of 
the college and sold thein back when 
through with them Init later tliey were 
issued with the other equipments from the 
Military Department. The use of the dress 
hats was discontinued soon aftei'the arrival 
of Lieut. Sage in '86. 

.Jan. 1, 1891 the gray uniform was 
changed for the blue uniform now worn. 
I for one am not pleased with the change. 
This is not a detachment of the Army, 
neither is it a Militia Post, but simply a 
corps of cadets and I claim that the cadet 
gray, the uniform worn at West Point, is 
better suited for us than the army blue 
uniform. The old blouse was plain and a 
change was needed but would not a coat of 
the same material, ranging cost in be- 
tween the dress coat aud blouse, having 
the freedom of the latter but a little more 
dressy, give better satisfaction? 

H. M. T. 



MASS MEETING, HELD FEB. 12, 1891. 

The meeting was called to order by the 
president of the Senior class, for the pur- 
pose of forming a Polo Association, and 
transacting any other business that might 
properly come before it. 

The following officers were elected to the 
Polo Association : 

President, J. B. Hull. 

Sec. and Treas., G. B. Willard. 

Senior Director, W. C. Paige. 

Junior " G. E. Taylor. 

Soph. " J. R. Perry. 

Fresh. " F. I. Parker. 

Captain, G. B. Willard. 

Manager, A. G. Eames. 

Action was then taken in regard to the 
manner in which the editors of Aggie Life 
shall be eleoteii in future years. 

Mr. Felt moved that the editors of Aggie 
Like be elected by the Seniors of the board, 
amenable to the Senior class, the decision 
of the Senior class amenable to the College. 
Seconded by Mr. Hull and carried. 

It was further moved and seconded that 
each class prepare a list of six men which 
they recommend to the Senior editors from 
which selection may be made. Carried. 

The meeting then adjourned. 

H. T. Shores, Pies. 
F. L. Arnold, Sec. 



76 



AGGIE LIFE. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Publisliecl Fortnightly by the Students of the 
Mass. Affriciiltural College. 



Terms $1,00 per year, in advance. 



Single copies, 10c. 



Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 



BOAST) OF EDITORS : 

E. P. FELT, Editor-iu-Cliief, 
O. V. B. I.AGE, Business Manager, 
A. G. EAMES, '91, H. N. LEGATE, '91, 

J. L. FIELD, '«2, G. E. TAYLOR, '93, 

G. F. CUELEY, '9H. 



Address all commuuications to the Business Manager. 



Let every student remember that the 
Saturday gymnasium exercises are pro- 
vided by the Athletic Association, so tliat 
every man may find out what he is qualified 
for, and go into training for that branch. 
It is a duty liiat each student owes the 
college to come and do his best, even if, 
to his knowledge he is not fitted for any 
special class of athletics. Come ! and find 
out your capabilities, for next spring an 
athletic team is to be put into the field. 



It is certainly a privilege to have an 
afternoon off, to spend in study, reading or 
pastime, but to spend the whole or a greater 
part of it in anothei' fellow's room is an 
imposition. Especially is it so, when in 
company with a few others you combine to 
make his room a hostelry and by your 
laughter and conversation render it impos- 
sible for him to put the afternoon to the 
use which he wishes to make of it. Good- 
fellowship is a fine thing in its place, but 
to take such liberty is an offence of which 
it is to lie hoped none will be guilty when 
once reminded of it. 



THE-age when men were educated in log 
school houses, and when the boys carved 
their names in the rude benches, and upon 
the walls, is past, or should be, but some 
of the chairs in the recitation rooms about 
college, the walls of the basement, and 
various other places, seem to point some- 
what in the direction of that age yet. 
Each student should take pride in main- 
taining the appearance of the college in 
every way, and not only not disfigure col- 
lege property in any way, but should see 
to it that others are reminded of their for- 
gelfulness in this respect. 



We are glad to be able to say that there 
are many men in college, — in fact, they 
are in a majority, — who, when asked to 
pay their ta.x levied foi' the support of 
some public enterprise, respond at once, as 



if it were a piivilege to be enrolled as a 
part'of our college community. We would 
like to have them respond in like manner 
when asked for contributions to these col- 
umns. It is enough to make one tremble 
for the future of this paper to observe the 
reception given the Editor-in-Chief when 
he solicits parties not on the board of 
editors to write articles. It surprises us to 
hear a man say that the seven editors ought 
to be able to write enough. The function 
of the editorial board is rather to act as a 
balance wheel than to furnish all the motive 
power required. We do not object to doing 
considerable writing, but if the three lower 
classmen members of the board are to write 
all that come from the three lower classes, 
where is the material to come from to fur- 
nish next year's board? We respectfully 
submit this question to the serious consid- 
eration of our fellow students. 



You are all doubcless aware that at a 
recent Mass Meeting, the election of the 
new board of editors was transferred from 
the different classes to the Senior editors. 
There can be no doubt that this is an 
improvement on the method at first pro- 
posed. The Senior editors liave had an 
opportunity during the year to discover the 
men who are best fitted to undertake the 
future management of the paper. They 
will naturally be as anxious as anyone for 
its future welfare and be much less likely 
to be influenced by personal feelings than 
the different classes would be. Under the 
old arrangement it might easily happen 
that some man popular with his class, but 
unfitted for the position would be put upon 
the board. With the new system, although 
this might still happen it would be much 
less likely to, and in fact, the danger would 
be reduced to aminimum. Another feature 
of the new system still remains to be 
noticed. Each class will give in a list of 
six men to the Editor-in-Chief, from whom 
the editors for the ensuing year will be 
selected if it appears desirable. Now, 
although the Senior editors are not bound 
to follow these lists the}' will, nevertheless, 
have a considerable influence over them. 
This being the case, the classes cannot 
exercise too much care in making out their 
lists. It is important that personal and 
society feelings should not be allowed to 
Influence the recommendations. Do not 
vote to put a man on the list simply 
because he belongs to your fraternity or 
because you are personally friendly to him. 
Vote for the men who are good writers and 
who are willing to work. If anv class 



follows out this principle it will have done 
its duty and will certainly have no reason 
to complain that its recommendations are 
disregarded. 



GLEANINGS. 
Feb. iOth, '91 bolt on Lieut. 
Who puffed up Cranes' eyes? 
The band is doing good work. 
How did St. Valentine use you? 
Dr. Goessmann to '91 "We are chemists" 
Sawyer seems to be wailing for his razor 
to be honed. 

See Blodgett & Clark's new announce- 
ment. 

Prof. Warner lectured at Granby last 
week. 

There was no inspection of rooms last 
Saturday. 

Feb. 14. Horner and Graham received 
valentines. 

'91 has accepted Dunklee of Greenfield 
as class photographer. 

Have you seen the patent-double-acting- 
mirth-producing-salute ? 

It is quite encouraging to see so many 
working for the gold medal. 

E. H. Dickinson '88, and S. H. Field 
'88, made us a visit Feb. 14. 

Feb. 1J3. Stockbridge guards the '94 in 
Dr. Wellington's lecture room. 

Prof. Paige — Some one please wake Mr. 
Gay and then we will proceed. 

T. S. Bacon '94 returned Feb. 16, quite 
recovered from his recent illness. 

The drill for the past week has been 
manual of arms and company drill. 

The regular drill that should have occur- 
red last Friday', came off Thursday. 

Prof. Fernald, on account of sickness, 
Feb. 19, was unable to meet his classes. 

Feb. 16, '91 and others attend a post- 
mortem examination of Pledge's Empire. 

The lettuce at the plant house is looking 
well and cabbages are ready to prick out. 

Mr. Belden's wedding will occur Mar. 
17, instead of Feb. 17 as we had it in the 
last issue. 

The singing school is now practicing on 
college songs. All should come out and 
learn them. 

The Natural History Society witnessed 
a very interesting dissection by Prof. J. B. 
Paige last evening. 

Shores and Felt will attend the Conven- 
tion of Volunteers at Cleveland, held from 
Feb. 26th to March 1st. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



77 



Feb. 16. P. M. Howard '75 of Baive, 
Mass., lectured on the Holstein-Kriesian 
Cattle before the Seniors. 

Pledge's Empire, the large Holsteiu Bull 
owned b}- the college, died Feb. 16, cause, 
tetanus. He weighed over a ton. 

The windows in the Drill Hall will soon 
be supplied with screens. The janitor will 
hail their advent with pleasure. 

Pres't McLouth of South Dakota Agr. 
College, was in town last week and inspect- 
ed the various departments of M. A. C. 

All exercises were suspended F'eb. 23 in 
observation of Washington's birthday. 
Quite a number spent the day at their 
homes. 

Athletics, Feb. 21. High kick, Hull, 
'St, 1st; Crane, '92, 2d. One mile walk, 
Paig?, '91, 1st; time, 8 miu., 45 sec; 
Legate, '91, 2d. 

The Sophomores and Freshmen must 
" brace up" if they expect to do anything 
next spring. Last Saturday tiie}' were 
conspicuous by their absence. 

AV. H. Eauney, '93, has a nice stock of 
student's supplies for sale. Call and see if 
he is not worthy of your patronage. We 
should encourage home enterprise. 

Feb. 14. A school from Haydenville 
visited the college, after looking over the 
college, the teacher inquires, "Where is 
the Agricultural college?'' She thought 
this was Amherst college. 

Feb. 12. Delegates from the convention 
at Williamstown report. The convention 
filled them wilh enthusiasm, and the royal 
waj' they were entertained gave them a 
very favorable opinion of the town. 

The members of the Amherst Chapter, 
Q. T. V. Fraternity held a reunion and 
banquet, Friday evening, Feb. 20th, at 
Belchertown. Notwithstanding the stormy 
weather many alumni were present and 
one of the best of good times was enjoj'ed 
by all. 

Mr. W. H. Beal, for four years a chem- 
ist at the Experiment Station, has received 
an appointment under Dr. Atwater, Direct- 
or of the Central Office of Experiment 
Stations, Department of Agriculture, Wash- 
ington, D. C. Mr. Beal is a graduate of 
the Agricultural and Mechanical College of 
Virginia. 
., Program of W. I. L. S. for next Friday 
evening: Declamation by F. H. Fowler; 
Question — Resolved tl'at the single laud 
tax would be a benefit to tha farmer. 1st 
Aff. J. Baker, 1st Neg. G. F. Curley, 2d 
Aff. J. E. Gifford, 2d Neg. H. G. Stock- 



well ; Declamation, C. P.Lounsbuvy ; Read- 
ing, F. T. Harlow ; Essay, H. M. Howard. 

Competetive drill. The competetive drill 
will occur at College Hall Saturday evening 
Feb. 28. The order of exercises. 1st Indi- 
vidual competetive drill in manual of arms 
for prize medal. 2nd, Competetive drill, 
company for the position of color company. 
3d, Sabre drill. The Individual compe- 
tetive will be conducted by Lieut. Cornish, 
and the Sabre drill by Major Ruggles. 

Owing to tha polo game Saturday Feb. 
14, the athletic exercises were not very 
largely contested. P'or the half mile run 
there were three competitors. E. T. Clark 
'92 was the only one to finish. Time 2.32. 
For the high jump there were also three 
competitors. First and second places were 
as follows: G. O. Sanford '94, 1st, G. E. 
Taylor '92, 2nd. 

Last week Mr. S. M. Sayford held a 
number of special meetings iu the Y. M. 
C. A. rooms, beginning Wednesday even- 
ing and closing Sunday. The meetings 
were well attended, though many fellows 
had gone home for a few days. Over 
twelve men promised to live a Christian 
life in the future, besides many others who 
were deeply interested. The Christian 
men were also helped very much and many 
resolved to live a better life. Sunday 
evening Mr. Sayford gave his confidential 
talk to the young men of the colleges and 
the town, in the town hall, which was 
nearl3' filled. Mr. Sayford evidently knew 
what he was talking about, and showed all 
his listeners the evil tendencies of many 
practices so common among young men. 
At the close of the talk many entered into 
a covenant to forsake these ways and live 
a more manly life. 

A mock trial was held by the W. I. L. S. 
last Friday evening. A suit for a divorce 
was brought against Timothy Mulligan by 
Betsey Mulligan, his lawful wife, who to- 
gether with her daughter Maggie claimed 
to have been mal-treated by said Mulligan. 
M. Ruggles acted as Mr. Mulligan, E. L. 
Boardman as Mrs. Mulligan, C. F. Johnson 
as Maggie. The judge was B. L. Hartwell, 
clerk, F.S. Hoyt, crier, W. A. Brown, fore- 
man of the jury, H.E.Crane. The witnesses 
were as follows : for the plaijitiff, Maggie 
Mulligan, H. B. Emerson, E. W. Morse, 
C. P. Lounsbury, H. F. Staples, F. L. 
Green. For the defendant, F. H. Hender- 
son, F. T. Harlow, A. E. Melendy, H. G. 
Stockwell. They were called up in order 
and testified. After the pleas by E. P. 
Felt for the plaintiff and H. M. Howard 



lor the defendant, the jury filed out. Soon 
after they returned and reported. Mulli- 
gan was found guilty and a divorce was 
granted his wife. The counsel for the de- 
fendant appealed. Court adjourned sine 
die. 

Thursday, the r2tli, Hull received a let- 
ter from the Storrs Agl. School, Conn, to 
the effect that they would like to play our 
team at polo on the ice at Storrs, Conn. 
A tax was levied, the money raised, and 
Saturday morning the team started for 
Eagleville, Conn., where they were met by 
the Storrs team, who had decided that it 
was advisable to play at that |)lace instead 
of at Storrs. At ten o'clock the game be- 
gan, and after two twenty minute halves 
the score was three to three. Then play 
was resumed with the understanding that 
the first team scoring should be considered 
victors. Our team was tlie first to score. 
'J'he teams were made up as follows : 

Storrs. Aggik. 

Caclwell, 1 „.„,, , fWillarcI, 



Rushers. 



.Jewett, / 
Manchester, Centre, 
Chamberlain. Half-back, 



r 

I Hull, 
Paige, 

Fletcher, (Rog- 
ers, 2d half. 
Frisbee, Goal Lehnert, 

The following is the official score : 

Goals, Won by. Rush by. Caged by. Time, m. 

1. Storrs. Jewett. Cadwell. .30 

2. Aggie. Jewett. Willard. 13.10 

3. Storrs. Chamberlain. Jewett. 18.00 

4. Aggie. Hull. Hull. 2.00 

5. Aggie. Hull. Willard. 9.00 

6. Storrs. Chamberlain. Cadwell. 4.00 

7. Aggie. Hull. Willard. 13.20 
Score — Aggie 4, Storrs 3. Fouls — Wil- 
lard, Rogers. Stops, Lehnert 4, Frisbee 2. 
Referees — F. O. Vinton, Fletcher. Timer 
— Vibert. 

After the game the Storrs men took our 
men to the former's grounds to dinner and 
treated them in a decidedly gentlemanly- 
manner throughout their stay. They came 
back on the four o'clock train from Eagle- 
ville. 



Y. M. C. A. 



Feb. 26.— Led by the Spirit. Rom. 8 : 1-7. 
H E. Crane. 

March 1. — The Secret of Christian Suc- 
cess. Josh. 1:6-9; Matt 25 : 
23. E. T. Clark. 

March 5. — Deliverance from Death. Rom. 
6: 1-14. F. H. Henderson. 

March. 8. — Praise Service. Ps. 100. L. 
W. Smith. 



ALUMNI. 
John C. Cutter, '72, Surgeon, Mass. Di- 
vision S. of V. has been elected a Compan- 
ion of the First Class in the Mass. Com- 
mandery of the Military Order of the 
Royal Legion of the United States. 



78 



AGGIE LIFE. 



COMMUNICATION. 

Messes. Editors : In Aggie Life of Jan. 
28tli I noticed a short editorial iu reference 
to a commuuication from one of the alumni, 
which expressed a wish that others of the 
alumni would follow his example. 

Now, I have never written an article for 
publication, but as I earnestly desire the 
success of Aggie Life, a worthy enterprise 
which ought to have the support of every- 
one who has the interests of the college 
at heart, I will make a few sugges- 
tions to the undergraduates who have 
not laid out their future business plans, 
which, if you think worthy of publication, 
very well, if not, throw it in the waste bas- 
ket. 

I think every graduate of the college 
should, if he has the time and money to 
spare, take a post-graduate course in some 
special study, either at his own Alma Mater 
or at some other college or scientific school, 
so as to thoroughly prepare himself for his 
life work, first by caiefuUy studying, before 
graduation, his natural tastes and business 
capacity, then select, if possible, a pursuit 
that is not overcrowded, such as analytical 
chemistry, civil, mechanical, or electrical 
engineerinsr, veterinary science, architec- 
ture, draughting, especially mechanical, 
etc., as there is a demand for those who 
thoroughly understand these pursuits, and 
not much danger of their being overcrowd- 
ed, like the professions, and the mer- 
cantile pursuits, as at the present time 
so many hoys, girls, and young women 
take the places as clerks, book-keepers, etc., 
which used to be occupied by young men, 
who now cannot afford to accept the low 
salaries offered. 

I am only too sorry that I did not take a 
post-graduate course upon graduation, for 
during the last year at college I felt as if I 
were just beginning to learn something, my 
mind seemed to grasp the subjects better 
and my ideas expanded. I suppose every 
Senior has had a similar feeling. 

In this connection 1 would respectfully 
suggest to the Trustees that if the college 
had a Chair of Electrical Science it would 
add greatly to the benefits to be deiived 
from the college, as. electricity will soon 
rule the world, and, as it is intended that 
the graduates shall ha\ e a good scientific, 
as well as an agricultural education, the 
college should keep up with the times. 

A good electrical engineer commands a 
tine salary (an electrician once informed me 
that a good electrical engineer received a 
salary of $125 per month) and it will be 



many a long year before there will be much 
competition in that line, as it is a deep 
study. 

Good civil, electrical, and mechanical 
engineers, veterinary surgeonsand draughts- 
men could find employment in this city and 
section, but there is small chance for clerks, 
book-keepers, doctors, lawyers, etc., to make 
a good living. I think any young man 
should select, if possible, the business he 
has a taste for. If these hints should be 
of any use in shaping the future course of 
any of the students of the M. A. C. they 
are welcome to them. 

A '74 Alumnus. 
Hagerstown, McL, Feb. 9, '91. 





WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY. 

Tbis great holiday for which the boys are 
generally so eager, has at last come and 
gone for the year 1891, but how many of 
us stopped to think what it was for, and 
why it was set apart as a holiday. 

It is true, we all know that George Wash- 
ington was born on the twenty-second day 
of February, but was this the only reason 
why it was made a holiday by the govern- 
ment? Let us see. 

George Washington was brought up in 
what we would call the backwoods, but see 
what a man he made. He guided many 
safely through battle, and was generally 
victorious in whatever he undertook. 

He was always looking out for the coun- 
try's interests and did much to lilt the bur- 
dens from the colonies and to throw off the 
bonds which held them to a tyrannical 
mother. After this was done, the people, 
seeing what he had done for them, thought 
that he would be a good one with whom to 
entrust the country's welfare, and, there- 
fore, elected him president of the United 
States. They were by no means disap- 
pointed, and after serving one term in that 
position, they re-elected him. 

While President, he performed his duties 
faithfully, and the people could well call 
him "Father of his Country." 

Was not this a glorious life to have 
lived, and is it not well worthy of the re- 
nown which the government gives it? 

I think so, and also that the govern- 
ment set this day apart in honor of that life 
and to show the people what it thinks of 
such men, and to encourage others to fol- 
low the example of him who was, " First 
in War, First in Peace, and First in the 
hearts of his Countrymen." 



BiiMiiu,-, is lnivii,o-~ H{\Mv WOOD \Mll ^('1 up 
Spre.irts lor the Boys this winter. Senrl your orders 
right along to get thore first. 

Go to BLODGETT & CLARK 
for CLOTHS or FURNISHING 
GOODS. 

They keep the best line and use 
the students well. 

Take your laundry to them Mon- 
day or Wednesday morning and 
yoti will get good work. 

-JOHN MULLEN. 



-DEALER IN- 



MEATS and PROVISIONS, 

VEGETABLES OF ALL KINDS IN SEASON, 

FISH AND OYSTERS, FOREIGN 

AND DOMESTIC FRUITS, 

AND CANNED 

GOODS. 

Palmer's Block, Main St.reel. 



E. R. BENNETT, 
Jeweler, 

Optician, 

Watchmaker. 

FINE GOODS! LOW PRICES! 

GOOD WORK WARRANTED. 

First Door from Post Office. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



79 



IF YOU WANT TO GET OYSTERS IN ANY 
STYLE GO TO 

E. B. ARNOLD'S 



OYgT 



!i 



ft: 



H^ 



Students are attended at sliort notice, 

Open all days oi' the week until 12 (rclock. 
Smidays from 9 a. ji. to 12-30 p. m., aiid from 
7 p. M. to 11 p. M. 

William's Block, Mercliaiils' How. 



The title piige of tins boolc Wiis drawn and engraved Ijy 

John Jtur^ls, 



6 Davis Street, 



BOSTON, MASS. 



Tlie various publications of Bates, Bowdoiu, Colby, 
Tufts, Mass. Agricultural College, Wellesly and Yale 
Uave used his work. He will submit sketches and cari- 
catures for your approval. 



OFFICE OF 

EDWARD A. THOMAS, 

FitjE y\i(D Life l^mkmi yiGEt^T, 

HEAL KSTATE FOR SALE ANT) TO LET. 



Office, Coohs Hlockf Amherst, 3Iass, 



GEO. GRAVES, 



DEALEi; IN 



Painters' 8upplie8 

Personal attention given to Frescoing, Dec- 
orating and Paper Hanging, and all 
Interior and Exterior 
Honse Painting. 

Pleasant St., near L J. Spear's Shop. 



AMHERST COLLEGE 

CO-OPER/ITIVE STEi LAUiRy 

and Carpet RenovaviOE Estaijiisliment. 



Aggie Agent. H. M. HOWARD. '91. 

Work taken Monday delivered Wedne.sday. 
" Wednesday delivered Saturday. 

SA-TISF.A.CTIOasr OXJ.A.E..A.lSrTE!BI3, 

OFFICE AT liUINE'.S. 

H. A. UTLEY, Manager. 



CHOICE OF OCCUPATION. 

From the time a person reaches that age 
where he begins to antici|)ate liis future, 
the very pei'plexing question often comes 
to him, "what shall be my life work?" 
Frequently, special aptitude for some line 
of work leaves the person without a doubt 
as to what profession or trade he is best 
ad;ipt<;d, and having so decided, all his 
energies may be pnt forth to perfect him- 
self in the line of work which he proposes 
to follow and thus he saves much valuable 
time. But, perhaps, the average young- 
man at the present time, being without any 
special talent which would indicate to him 
the occupation for which he is best suited, 
cannot determine this important question 
so easily. The years come and go without 
his being able to come to a decision in re- 
gard to his future career. Thus he passes 
from the preparatory schools into business 
or college life without a settled purpose. 
The question, "what shall I make my life 
work?" is constantly coming to him, but 
the more he considers the question, the 
farther does it seem from being solved. In 
the course of time an opening presents it- 
self to him, he seizes the opportunity and 
perhaps becomes successful in the line of 
work into which Fortune has almost com- 
pelled him to go. It very often happens 
that he finds himself placed in a position 
which is so well suited to him that his 
chances for success are better than they 
could have been in any other occupation. 
It may be, on the other hand, that his work 
will prove uncongenial to him, but by dili- 
gence and close attention to his duties he 
may yet become master of the situation 
and be attended with prosperity. It is 
evident, however, that such a man does not 
stand an equal chance with his more fortu- 
nate fellow, who has been able to discern 
those qualities in himself, which he is con- 
scious will result in successful work in a 
certain profession. But by being ever 
ready to make the most of one's surround- 
'i'lgs he may in the end outstrip his more 
talented competitor. 

One of the great advantages of education 
is that it allows a man to study his charac- 
ter under favorable circumstances. He 
perceives the lines of work and study to 
which he is naturally adapted, and with 
such knowledge as a clew he may be able 
to make a much wiser choice than would 
otherwise be possible. 

It becomes necessary for a young man, 
undecided as to his future work, to be ever 
on the alert for self improvement in all 
directions, to constantly watch for oppor- 



tunities of developing his different facul- 
ties, so that when he sees the guide post of 
Fate pointing in a certain direction, he may 
be able to enter upon his career, conscious 
of a certain degree of ability to accomplish 
the work, which shall confiout him. 
Then, let us not be discouraged, if, with 
our college life fast passing from us, we 
are still uncertain as to the exact line of 
work which we are to follow. Let the 
thought of our failing in this direction stiin- 
uhite us to make the most of all the advan- 
tages which these years of preparation have 
in store for us. 

F, S. H. 



OTHER COLLEGES. 

P. T. Barnum recently presented Tufts 
College with the body of a tiger valued at 
S10,000 when alive. 

A very fine art museum to cost 1150,000 
is to be added to .Stanford University by 
Mrs. Stanford. 

Elmira College has received an absolute 
gift of 1100,000 from Sloman Gillett of 
Elmira. 

Prof. N. H. Palmer of the Western 
Reserve University of Cleveland, O. has 
been elected to the chair of German at 
Yale. 



MAILS. 
Mail leaves college for P. O. at 1 p. m. 
and 7 p. m. on week days. On Sunday it 
leaves at 4-45 p. m. At the P. O. mails 
close as follows : 

Boston, 

7-45, 8-30, 10-15 a.m. ; 4-00, 6-45, 7-45 p.m. 

Neiu York, Western and Southern States, 

7-45, 10-15 A. M. ; 4-00, 6-45, 7-45 p. m. 

Northampton, Springfield and Western 

Massachusetts, 

7-20, 10-15, 10-45 A. M. ; 6-45 p. m. 

Northern way, N. L. Northern, 

8-30 A. M. 

The treasurer will be at his ofHce from 4 

to 5 p. M. on Saturdays throughout the 

term. 

The museum of natural history will be 
open to visitors from 1-30 to 3-30 each af- 
ternoon excepting Saturday and Sunday. 

The college library will be open from 2 
to 4 p. M. and from 6 to 8 p. m. each day, 
excepting Saturday and Sunday. On Sat- 
urday it will be open from 9 to 12 a. m. and 
from 2 to 4 p. m., and on Sunday from 2 
to 3 p. M. 

President Goodell will be at his office 
from 2 to 4 p. m. every afternoon except 
Saturday and Sunday. 



8o 



AGGIE LIFE. 



THE LIBRARY. 

The College Library slioiild be the resort 
of every student during a part of his leis- 
ure momeuts. The Library has now 
reached a position where it can fulfill the 
demands of the college, being well supplied 
with reference and standard works on Sci- 
ence, Philosophy and General Literature. | 

The doors of the College Library being j 
thrcwn open to us as they are, there is no 
reason whj' we should not avail ourselves 
of this privilege and spend many pleasant 
and profitable moments in consulting its 
contents. If you are hastening around 
college in search of a Senior any after- 
noon and are unable to find him, do not 
forget to visit the Library, where you will 
doubtless find hnn with several of his class- 
mates, pondering over the works of Politi- 
cal Economy in search of a subject for his 
Commencement Thesis. If you wish to 
make a specialty of any particular subject, 
seek the opinion of your Professor by 
whom it is taught, and he will be glad to 
refer you to the most reliable books on that 

subject . 

When in the Library consult the librarian 
and he will assist you in finding whatever 
you may desire to read. Indeed, we have 
our Reading Rooms which contain much 
valuable reading matter, but many of our 
newspapers are filled with a vast amount | 
of trash, tales of gossip, rumors of things 
to be. Articles on all sorts of subjects are 
tumbled into our minds, without any at- 
tempt to think them over or to make them 
our own. .Such a system is most disaster- 
ous to the memory of the reader and is 
utterly unprofitable. By reading books, 
we get a more continuous and exhaustive 
treatise on any subject ; however, these, 
like papers, are very numerous, and it is j 
for this reason that a choice should be ' 
made in our reading, and the more precious 
our time the more solicitious we should be j 
to choose only the best. Books are indeed | 
our principal instructors, and do more in 
the formation of our moral character and i 
intellectual habits than all other means 
combined. 

Let us, therefore, aim to read that which 
is of the highest character and remember 
that it amounts to nothing unless mastered, 
digested and assimilated. We should make 
a good selection, avoiding all books having 
deliterious tendencies, and procuring those 
best calculated to elevate the taste of the 
reader and lead to other reading of a more 
useful and valuable character. For in- 
stance, in selecting a course of Agr'l Read- 
ing the book entitled " My Farm at Edge- 



wood" is a kind of reading to awaken 
interest in the right direction and also fur- 
nishes much amusement. 

The Scientific class as well as that of 
Useful Arts is well filled out and we can 
feel proud of being the possessors of such 
a fine Scientific Librarj\ 

It we wish to take up the reading of fiction 
the new book is not always the best, and 
may be the worst. The standard works 
are the most reliable ; in this kind of liter- 
ature we have the dramas of Shakespeare, 
which have never been equalled, and the 
novels of Scott, which are unsurpasssd. 
Fragments from Chaucer, Shakespeare, 
Pope and Browning linger in the mind, 
while verses of hundreds of others are 
forgotten. 

The novels of our Library are of an 
interesting character, comprising the works 
of Scott, Thackera3', Eliott and Roe. 

The greatest precaution has been used 
in selecting books to be placed at our 
disposal. 

Our college life is too short for folly, 
then let us not fill our minds with sweep- 
ings and cobwebs of foul thinkers but 
strive to spend more time amongst this 
valuable collection of books. 

L. F. Howe. 



A WARNING. 

(Dedicated to members of the Senior Class.) 
I was a moustaclie, "small but sweet," 
Possessed Idj' a Senior discreet. 
It would liave been well with me, 
But for reasons soon you'll see, 
ily efforts to grow met defeat. 

Formerly in my youthful days, 
I was rather too small to raise ; 
So with razor very keen, 
My master sheared me off clean. 
Hoping thus to increase my pace. 

So he explained — I believing, 
(He was not used to deceiving,) 

Accepted my cruel fate, 

And at au increasing rate, 
My woi'k was bravely achieving. 

So one day, as the time had arrived 
To shave again — for I had thrived — 

.\s he stood before the glass. 

Concluded that I would pass. 
And that I should at least be tried. 

With this good fortune I was pleased. 

And the opportunity seized. 

Push this way and then that way. 
Worked " for business" night and day. 

And my last efforts not once eased. 

But he was hard to satisfy. 

And to hurry me on would try. 
He would twist and then curl me, 
Would finger and now twirl me, 

And even used on me a dye. 

I would not stand this long, you see, 

And so at last to avenge me. 
All my labors I did check. 
And became a complete wreck, 

-Ind will remain so, — probably. 

MORAL. 

So if your moustache will not grow. 

Or its progress seems very slow. 
Find out at once if jou may. 
If you're to Ijlame in this way, 

Then the remedy you may know. 

F. S. II. 



E, B, DlgKIIJgOI], D.D.S, 



^■DEIJTftL I^OOIIQS.^ 



KELLOGG'S BLOCK, 



AMHERST, MASS 



Office Hours, 9 to 12 a. m.. 1-30 to 5 p. M. 



«S-Ethei- and Nitrons Oxide Gas administered wlien 
desired. 



.A.T TKE 



>MHEeST CASH SHOE STORE, 

You can get the most for your money. 
BOOTS AND SHOES, RUBBERS. OVER- 
V SHOES, SLIPPERS, TRUNKS, 
AND BAGS. 



REPAIRING NEATLY DONE. 
HAWES & STINSON, 

CASH ROW, AMHERST, MASS. 



AMHERST HOUSE 



LIVERY, FEED, /ND SALE STABLE. 



T. L PAIGE, Prop'r 



HACKS TO AND FROM ALL TRAINS, OM- 
NIBUSES, HACKS, DOUBLE AND 
SINGLE TEAMS FURNISHED 
AT SHORT NOTICE. 
CAREFUL DRIVERS. FAIR PRICES. 

A.MHEBST, MASS. 



Sheet Music, 



Music Books, 
String's 

FOR THE VIOLIN, BANJO, GUITAR, 



r)OWES ^ H^BIjLOGG, 



DKALER.S ]N 



-^^■gTLlDEDT'S 2UP?LIES-^ 



FANCY GROCERIES. CROCKERY, CIGARS, 

CIGARETTES, TOBACCO, FRUITS 

AND CONFECTIONERY, 



Cushmaii's iMusic Store, ^m^^^oommmmmoih^ 



a.i»ihe;iist. 



J, M, WAITE iSON, 
MTTE5S A1]I) ¥limi^W>. 



ANB DKALKRS IN 



Hats, Caps, Furs, Trunks, Bags, Furnisliini Goods. 

Latest Styles in Furuishiugs. Agent for 

Knox's and Youuiau's Hats. Sole 

Agent for Pittsfield 

Laundry. 

Hats Repaired. Furs Renovated 

Give us a call before purchasing-. 
iVO. S I'HCENIX ItO\y, AMJtlEli^r. MASS. 



%\nbtxBt Mouse, 



SDoors South of P. 0., - AMHERST, MASS. 



EDWIN NELSON, 

Books and Stationery, 

Next door to Post Office, 
AMHERST, MASS. 



AMHEKST, MAS.S. 



The undersigned is pleased to announce 
to his former patrons and others desiring 
C4ame Spreads or Dinners, that he is always 
prepared to accomodate (at short notice) 
hirge or small parties. 

Ani|)le dining room capacity for 200 peo- 
pie. 

LORENZO CHASE, pRCP'R. 



WOOD'S HOUSE 

HSIl^ I)5ESSII]g ?oonjg, 

Razors Honed and Shears .Sharpened at 
short notice. 

ABIIIEEST, MASS. 



C. Yi. KENFIELD, 



ao. p 



H 



H 



peicM Tailor, 



-A.>/II3:EI?,S T, 



I«I-A.SS. 



Wood's Jiloclc, 



Amherst, Mass. 



SPECIAL. 



el. p. FJAWSON, 



DEALER IN 



.^DENTISTS. 5). 
C. S. GATES, D. \). S. 



A Stem Wind and Set Walthmii, Hnmpden, Elg-in or 11 
linois movement in a (iold Pilled Case for SJ,5.00. 



Uralirellas covered Avliili' yon wait, also dealer 
hi Giuis, Rifles, Ainiiuuiitif)ii ,ainl Sport ini;' Goods 
of all kinds. Aniatcnr riiotoitrapliic Ontlits and 
Supplies. Views and Pictures taken wlten de- 
sired. Views of Andierst and \'iciiiity for sale. 
Call and see before pnrcliasin,!>' elsewhere. 

4S-WATCH AND CLOCK REPAIRING A SPECIALTY., Sir 



WftTgRES, 0LO0Kg, JEWELl^Y 

FINE POCKET CUTLERY, SILVER ANU 

PLATED WARE, OPTICAL GOODS 

CANES, SPORTING AND 

FANCY GOODS, 

GOLD Pens, Fine Stationery 



REPARING NEATLY and PROMPTLY DONE. 



AMHERST, MASS. 



J. J.. LOVELL, 

-^PHOTQgRftPHE]^,^: 



T. G. HUNTINGTOxN^, D. D. S. dry plates, compolind developer 

i AND SENSITIZED PAPER. READY 
FOR USE. 



CUTZER'S BZ,OCK, AMHERST, MASS. 



OFFICE HOURS .- : 

9 .A.. l^JL. TO 5 F. IsAL. 

i 
[ 

Ether and Nitrons Oxide administered wlien4 
de.sired. 



PRINTING FOR AMATEURS 

Done in tlie best manner. 



DWIGHIP fflOOf^E, 

BILLIARD ANDTOQL 

a I'ha'ni.f- Row ( (fjt-stnirs ), 
AMHERST, MASS. 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Massachusetts Agricultural College, 




A-iixlierst, JMa^iss. 




VOL. I. 



AMHERST, MASS., MARCH ii, 1891. 



NO. I. 



k lOREHOUSE, 
ERlMTEiRS,* 



C. H. SANDERSON k CO 



CASH DKALEES IN 



AMHERST, 



MASS. 



Mass, AGi|_icyLT 

Botanical Department, 

AJillERST, MASS. 

We would iiifoi'iii the friends of the college, 
and the pnblic generally, tliat we are prepared 
to supply 

FRUIT AND OKNAMEMTAL TREES AN]) 

SHRUBS, SMALL FRUITS AND 

PLANTS, 

trne to name, also 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

all at t!r,' lowest price. 

For Trees, Phmts. Sliralis, Flowers and Small 

Frnits, address. 

Prof. S, T. Maynard, 

AMHERSr, MASS 



THE AMHERST 



FURHITURE/ND CARPET STORE, 



^'S|>[fer 



A complete line of goods snited to the students' 
Avants. 

BEDSTEADS, MATTRESSES, PILLOWS, 



S TUDY DESKS AND CHAIRS , 
LOUNCtES 

WINDOW SHADES, DRAPERIES, 

CARI'IoTS, RUGS, ETC., ETC. 

Alt f/nofis Strii-ffi/ Cash. tni(f at Loirest Prices^ 



h]. JJ. MAKSH, 



10 I'naoNix i!i>\v, 



AAIllKKS'l', MASH 



FIDE gLOTfilDS 



Hats, Caps, Umbrellas, 'and Gents' 
Furnishing Goods. 



CASH ROW, 



AMHERST. 



S/NDE[|SOH k Thompson, 

CiSH KlUr.ERS IN 

Dl'y and Fancy Goods, 



HOSIERY, RIBBONS, AND SMALL 
WARES OF ALL KINDS. ' 

AMHERST, MASS. 



BOOTS#SHOKS 

FOR EVERYBODY. 



A riNlS rJNK OK S'rilDHNTS' 

DliESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER,' 
BALS. AND CONGRESS, 

A FULL MNE OF 

E-TJEBEK, CS-OOiDS, 

I'OilT-r.ALL SHOKS AT LOWEST (JASII PEICES. 

Repairing Done Promptly. 

T. W. SLOAN, 

a nraixix itoir. 



WHERE DO YOU BUY m\ 

Meerschaum Pipes? 
French Briar Pipes? 
Choice Tobacco? 
Sponges? , ' 

Soap? ..■'' 

Hair Briislies" from 25 cts. np? 
Combs from '> cts. np? 
Clioice New Yorlv Confectionery? 
Sliaving Mugs? 
Shaving Soap? 
Lather Brushes'? 

Cigarettes, fresh every two wcelcs? 
The Best Soda in America? 
The Best Bay Rnm? 
Imported Perf.nmes ? 
Prescriptions prepared by licensed pliarniacists? 
Imported Domestic Tootli Brushes? 

If yon have not obtained these necessaries at 
DEUEL'S DRUG STORE, yon. have begun 
wrong. Deuel's is tlie leading Drng Store in 
Western Mass., and keeps the largest assort- 
ment of goods at l.iottom prices. , 



w 



JJJ 



S DRUG STOR 

Amlierst Hoose Block, Ainlisrst, lass. 



HENRY ADAMS, 



PHARMACIST, 



NO. 1 COOK'S Bl.OCK,. 



AMHKIIST, MAS.S. 



S, J, SULLIVAW, 

JE.U.EU IN 

Secondd^and Clothes 

AND 

FURNITUEE. 

[^Orders promptly attended to.,,^ 
I'. (). Box, :!11) AMHERST, MASS. 



Pure Drugs aMtMedicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORT- 
ED AND DOMESTIC CIGARS, 
CIGARETTES, ETC., 
MEERSCHAUM AND BRL-VR PIPES, 
FISHING TACKLE AND SPORTING GOODS, 

Metallic Cartrulges for Pistols, and Sporting 
and SpriiigtieUl PiHes. 

Sunday and^ night calls I'esponded to at rest- 
deuce, first door wesfrof Wood's Hotel. 



^rugs, Medicines, 

TOILET ARTICLES, 

CONFECTIONERY, CIGARS, CIGARETTES 

AND SMOKERS' GO(.)DS. 



rtnsici.tys' I'm i<cj!J rrioxs c.iitK- 
Firi.iyy conri'o ii.\i>Jin, 

tl riKENLX HOW. 

Order your COAIi here. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



VOL. I. 



ABII-IERST, MASS., MARCH 11, 1891. 



No. 11 



VERITAS VINCIT. 
In drowsy mood I sat at recitation, 
With liead inclined as if in contemplation. 
Distinctions psychologic being finely drawn, 
Were soporific in eflect, tliat morn. 
My brain lialf dazed, ray fancy rnnning wild, 
I seemed enclosed by books immensely piled. 
No means appeared by which I could surmount 
Such lofty theories beyond account. 
The only resource left was to bore through. 
Which seemed a thing impossible to do ; 
But flashing light soon shone on every side, 
Which first bewildered, then became a guide : 
One little opening wide aud wider grew : 
Till finally all theories, old and new. 
Came tumbling down and crashing at my feet, 
I saw my liberty become complete. 
The percept— that I was no longer bound. 
The concept — that escape might now be found. 
Deductive reasoning led me to conclude 
I'd better "skip," while chances were so good. 
Skip? yes ! from page to page and book to book, 
Resolved that backward I would never look. 
Who goes from facts to truths will soonest 
' reach 

The goal, as new psychology doth teach. 
So from the fact that little did I know, 
I soon deduced the truth — 'tis even so. 
Forthwith my head was bumped against the 

wall. 
As seatmate gave me notice of a call. 
I heard a startling voice pronounce my name. 
Quickly I answered, "Here am I the same." 
Questioned, I turned and looking wondrous 

wise, 
I took my laughing classmates by surprise. 
That, from a nap so sound, I could awake 
And such astounding propositions make. 
Wild guesses mixed with swelling words were 

given — 
Nevertheless, ray raark stood number seven. 
Ah! college boys, please listen while I say , 
That such example, though it may seem GAY, 
Should not be followed, lest you find at last, 
Examinations cannot thus be passed. 



NIAGARA IN WINTER. 

The thermometer was hovering about 
zero, as the train from Buffalo slowed up 
at Niagara Falls aud allowed us to stop 
over and view these celebrated falls. Alter 
a good breakfast we engaged a team and 
were driven to the bridge above the falls, 
that connects Goat Island with the Ameri- 
can shore, and here stopped a few minutes 
to look up the rapids. At this point the 
river is over four thousand feet wide, and 
we looked with surprise up onto acres of 
rushing, tumbling water that extended up 
as far as the eye could reach, and was 
broken here and there by huge boulders 
and cakes of ice. After a few minutes we 



crossed to Goat Island and drove to the 
point overlooking the American Falls ; here 
a grand view is obtained of these falls that 
make a direct plunge of one hundred and 
sixty-five feet; in a few minutes we de- 
scended and crossed a small bridge to a 
large ledge, called Lunar Island ; here we 
stood with notliing but a slight rail between 
us and that terrible fall, while everything 
we touched was thickly coated with ice, 
formed from the spray that blew in all 
directions ; as we stood there in silent 
admiration the sun came from behind a 
cloud and shot its rays into that cold, 
biting spray, forming a beautiful rainbow. 
Words fail to express the grandeur and 
beauty of the wild winter scene. 

Reluctantly we turned away and were 
driven to the other side of the island, where 
we obtained a fine view of the Canadian or 
Horse-slioe Falls, in the distance ; soon we 
passed up stream and crossed on the foot- 
bridge from one Sister island to another, 
till we reached the farther side of the 
Third Sister island, and witnessed the fas- 
cinating rapids above the Canadian falls. 
Here a person could sit for hours, watching 
the water pile itself into huge heaps, as 
though driven by some mysterious power ; 
half a mile away, across these raging- 
waters, the Canadian shore is visible ; the 
spray blows with stinging effect in our 
faces, — still we stand lost in silent admira- 
tion, — at last the severity of the cold com- 
pels us to leave this point and we return to 
our team and drive around the upper cud 
of the island, back over the bridge, onto 
the American shore ; then we pass down 
stream to prospect point that overhangs 
the American Falls. Here we stop a few 
minutes and watch the cakes of ice float 
over tiie falls ; see them descend with the 
spray and then notice the bits of ice below ; 
soon we pass on down to the suspension 
bridge — here we are informed that the 
bridge is one hundred and eighty-seven feet 
above the surface of the water, aud that 
the river is about as deep for a number of 
miles — the surface looks as calm as a mill- 
pond, but what a current there must be 
below. We drive slowly over the bridge 
and obtain a fine view of both falls ; the 
icicles hanging on the perpendicular banks 
on both sides attract our attention, some of 
them weigh tons ; the river gorge is nine 



miles long; soon we reach the Canadian 
shore, and drive up stream opposite the 
Canadian Falls. These falls are the largest 
and the greater bulk of water passes over 
them ; it is estimated that a sheet of water 
forty feet thick passes over that ledge aud 
falls one hundred and fifty feet; the spray 
hangs like a cloud over these falls, some- 
times shooting up higher than the falls, 
while the sun's rays form beautiful rain- 
bows in the mist ; ail surrouudiiig objects 
are thickly coated with ice. Can language 
do justice to such a scene? Men can only 
stand and watch iu silence, overawed by 
the grandeur, and then say to others "go 
and see." After watching this grand scene 
we leave it, feeling unable to appreciate it 
all, and return to the American shore. 

Next we pass down to the Whirlpool 
Rapids and descended those perpendicular 
banks to the water's edge ; here the current 
comes to the surface with a mad rush and 
piles itself into heaps ; hei'e Capt. Webb 
lost his life a few years ago. It was sublime 
to stand there and watch those rushing 
waters ; below we could see t^e Whirlpool, 
which is caused by a sudden bend in the 
river, up stream the lailroad suspension 
and cantilever bridges are outlined against 
the sky. After purchasing a few views we 
returned to the station feeling amply repaid 
for the time and money spent. 

E. P. F. 



AN ARGUMENT IN THE NEGATIVE. 

Should all who enter the M. A. C. be 
obliged to stay four years to complete the 
course ? 

There are manj- who enter this college 
vyith a detoimination to complete the 
course. A few soon after entering see 
their way clear to do all the required work 
in three years. Such men, if fortunate 
enough to secure the good-will of the Fac- 
ulty may succeed in accomplishing their 
desire. Some men who enter the M. A. 
C. have had the benefit of a first class iiigh 
school education, and are thus fitted to 
take a higher position than the average ap- 
plicant for admission. So far as ability 
goes then, he has a right to an advauced 
position. 

There is another class of students known 
as grinds. They are often poor iu pocket 
aud cannot afford to spend four years iu 



82 



AGGIE LIFE. 



accomplisliing that which it is possible for 
them to do in three. Who would wish to 
hindei' such men from trying to gain the 
desired end? Evidently they are able and 
willing to do the work and know that "Sa- 
tan finds some mischief still foi' idle hands 
(and minds) to do." They believe that 
hard work is good for a man and that you 
can hardly put more work on him than he 
can bear. "It is worry, not work, that 
kills a man." Grinds are incited to great- 
er activity by having just a little more 
work than they can accomplish with their 
present activity. Study is their delight. 

But some one says, if such men were 
allowed to gradually work their way 
through and finish the course in three years, 
we should have no class distinction or feel- 
ing among those who enter college the 
same year. Those who speak thus forget 
that of the large number who enter each 
year, only a few are grinds or men who 
have enjoyed superior educational advan- 
tages. Then too, such men are not in- 
clined to break up class pride ; they are 
too independent and too absorbed in their 
studies to be meddling with class politics. 

The numerous ' commercial schools 
throughout the United States are in gen- 
eral run on the principle of giving each 
man opportunity for development according 
to his own free will and ability. This 
method does not create classes and hence 
no money or energies are expended in 
maintaining class honors. There is a 
unity of the whole however, which is par- 
ticularly pleasing to observe. In these a 
certain amount of work must be done be- 
fore a certificate of sufficiency can be ob- 
tained ; yet it makes no difference whether 
a man is able to arrive at that stage in six 
months or a year ; he gets his diploma 
when the work is accomplished. Nothing 
but the individual's energy and ability will 
give him the right to a diploa;a. No man 
is borne along or kept from advancing by 
a class ; but he must stand on his merits, 
and gain what he does by himself and for 
himself. 

The three years course proposed for the 
nevv Chicago University will allow greater 
indivual freedom. It is proposed to govern 
the institution so as to bring about : great- 
er concentration on the part of the student ; 
permit the admission of students to the 
university atseveral times during the year ; 
make it possible for the summer months 
to be employed ;• provide against the pre- 
sent method of passing !ill men, the good 
and poor alike through the same course ; 
raise tlie standard of work ; furnish greater 



stimulus and incentive ; secure greater in- 
timacy between instructors and students ; 
encourage an independent feeling on the 
part of all who share the advantages of 
the university. 

The above has met the approval of the 
best educators of the country, being en- 
dorsed by the professors in all our leading 
universities and colleges. 

Such men as Pres. Eliot of Harvard are 
beginning- to advocate a three veais course 
in the academic department of the univer- 
sity so that professional training may be 
begun earlier. The professional training 
seems to the youth and his parents the 
prime necessity. And if both college and 
professional training cannot be afforded 
the former is to be the one neglected. The 
statistics show that the number of students 
in American colleges has not increased 
proportionally with the population at large. 
This may be because so much time is re- 
quired to be spent in the college course be- 
fore the young men are allowed to enter 
the professional schools. The report of 
the Harvard Faculty on the advisability of 
shortening the college coures to three years 
showed that 34 were in favor and 28 op- 
posed to the change. One reason for a 
shorter course is that the public schools 
are furnishing better prepared young 
men. 

The majority of the Faculty think the 
college should facilitate an optional short- 
ening of the time spent on its course lead- 
ing to A. B. This last statement is what 
is particularly applicable to the case of 
certain men here who on entering desire 
to spend a shorter time on the course of 
study leading to B. S. It seems advisable 
to them that those who are able and will- 
ing to complete the course in three years 
should be allowed to do so. More young 
men would be encouraged to enter college 
and be more apt to finish the course. 

H. M. A. 



"SHALL THE STANDARD OF AD- 
MISSION TO THE MASSACHU- 
SETTS AGRICULTURAL COL- 
LEGE BE RAISED?" 
The question of raising the standard of 
admission to the Massachusetts Agricultur- 
al College brings into consideration : 

First, the class of applicants, their pre- 
vious training, and their out look for the 
future. 

Second, the effect of such a change 
upon the success of the college. 

Those who apply for admission are, from 
the very nature of the purpose of the col- 



lege, drawn largely from farming districts 
where preliminary educational advantages 
are few. We also meet a class of appli- 
cants, who, not caring to enter regular 
classical colleges, yet desire practical 
training for useful life work beyond that 
furnished in early school years. 

At the present time, changing to a higher 
standard of admission, would necessarily 
debar a large percentage of these appli- 
cants from entry, and the number of stu- 
dents would dwindle to a dangerously low 
figure, such as would probably seriously 
cripple the enterprise. 

Being a college devoted to Agriculture, 
"the course of stndy" — to quote from 
Pres. Goodell — "is intended to give thor- 
ough and practical instruction in the five 
departments, assisting to give a better un- 
derstanding of: 

I. Agriculture, theoretical and practi- 
cal stock-breeding, drainage and irrigation, 
special crops, etc. 

II. Botany, including horticulture, mar- 
ket gardening, aboriculture, care of green 
houses, etc. 

III. Chemistry, in its application to 
agriculture and the industries, practice 
work in the laboratory, geology and mineral- 
ogy, so far as relating to the composition 
of soils, mineral constituents, etc. 

IV. Animal life, zoology, entomology, 
veterinary science, human anatomy and 
physiology. 

V. Mathematics and physics, including 
practical work in surveying, road making, 
laying of tiles, etc. Meteorology, in the 
relation of climate to crops, etc. 

It is to be regretted that with existing 
conditions, it is impossible to thoroughly 
cover this ground within the prescribed 
time ; but with our ever progressing meth- 
ods along all lines of educational work, the 
date is possibly at hand, and will be hailed 
with joy, when a more thorough and prac- 
tical preliminary education will be given. 

Then those who apply for training in 
special directions will be better prepared 
to enter upon such labor. 

Then the standard of admission may 
be raised without danger ; and such an in- 
stitution as the Massachusetts Agricultur- 
al College may devote much valuable time 
now given over to general elementary 
study, to its own special work. 

Charles E. Young, M. D. '8L 



This question was quite warmly discussed 
at the last annual meeting of the associate 
alumni at Amherst. A rather ambiguous 
resolution vv'as proposed, endorsing the fac- 



AGGIE LIFE. 



83 



iilty's efforts to raise the standard of ad- 
mission and the percentage reqnired of 
students dnring tlie college course. The 
resolution was carried, but by a very small 
majoiily. 

The strongest argument brought out 
in favor of raising the standard of admis- 
sion was : That young men examining the 
catalogue of M. A. C. and of Amherst 
College find that the latter contains a much 
stiffer examination, and hence (?), Am- 
herst is a better institution. 

My argument is in favor of leaving things 
alone, and I will briefly give the reasons 
for my conservatism. 

1st. We know what the present standard 
of admission does ; we do not know what a 
change will effect. The institution is turn- 
ing out a fine body of educated men ; I do 
not say there is no room for improvement ; 
far from that; the recent acquisition of 
chairs of Veterinary Science and of English 
are warmly welcomed. 

But what do the graduates accomplish? 
Three hundred and nineteen have received 
the degree of Bachelor of Science ; twelve 
are dead. Of the three hundred and seven 
living, we find that forty-five are farmers ; 
nine are in commercial pursuits connected 
with agriculture ; ten are florists, orange 
growers or butter makers ; two are agricul- 
tural editors, while thirty-eight are con- 
nected with Agricultural Colleges and Ex- 
periment Stations ; nine graduates are prac- 
ticing law, fourteen medicine, seven vete- 
rinary, one dentistry, while four are clergy- 
men, and si.x have received the degree of 
Doctor of Philosophy. Examine the re- 
maining one hundred and sixty odd, and 
you will find "no dead beats." 

All these things show that the graduates 
are competing successfully with the gradu- 
ates of classical institutions. 

The second part and also the end of my 
argument is : 

The Massachusetts Agricultural College 
was not established on the same basis as 
Williams or Amherst College. It was 
fonnded to fill a need which undoubtedly 
these institutions did not; therefore, I 
think it absurd to say that we must com- 
pete with Amherst College. Indeed, it is 
just as absurd to say that Amherst College 
must compete with our Alma Mater. 

Of the eighteen items required in Yale's 
terras of admission are ; eight in Latin, six 
in Greek, three in Mathematics and one in 
French or German. 

Brown and Williams require English 
composition ; the latter, also, Modern and 
Ancient Geography. 



Oui' humble College requires English 
Grammar, Geography, Arithmetic, Alge- 
bra to quadratic equations, the metric sys- 
tem, and History of the United States. 

The object of study is to educate ; knowl- 
edge without wisdom is nothing. Scientists 
said it was impossible to send four messag- 
es over one wire at the same time ; the in- 
ventors of the Quadrnplex had not enough 
knowledge to answer their opponents in 
writing, but they had the wisdom to send 
four messages at one time on one wire. 
So the dictum of knowledge was upset by 
wisdom. Would it not have been more 
wise for these scientists to have remem- 
bered Paul A. Chadbourne's definition of 
a science, " a collection of facts pertaining 
to any one subject?" The inventors of 
the Quadruplex had obtained some new 
facts as to electricity that made the science 
greater and broader. 

Lieut. C. A. L. Totten's great argument 
"Our Race — the romance of History," 
makes plain to us that the Anglo-Saxon 
race is the dominant factor of the world 
and that America is the greatest of all An- 
glo-Saxon countries. 

As the political and economic conditions 
of America are better than those of all 
other countries, so the institution that 
places the study of American History in its 
requirements for admission Is more patri- 
otic and of greater value to its country 
than the institution that requires a knowl- 
edge of the histories of dead races and of 
dead letters. 

I claim that an education in the natural 
sciences gives as much, if not more, wis- 
dom than a study of the dead languages, in 
that it teaches one to observe and how to 
use the things observed. 

If eternity vvas not near we could spend 
our time in learning all things but as we 
must for a short time only see " through a 
glass darkly," it is well that we use our 
time to the best advantage. 

Professor Luther Whiting Mason, the 
founder of the public school musical sys- 
tem in America, is now in Berlin, and un- 
der date of Jan. 6th, 1891, he writes a 
most interesting testimony obtained while 
with Prof. Virchow, the world's greatest 
pathologist, whom he visited with a card 
of introduction from the wiiter's father, to 
show him as a cured case of consump- 
tion of the lungs achieved in 1878 by 
American methods ; and let me say paren- 
thetically, for the sake of America's insti- 
tutions that his evidences of cure were re- 
ceived with respect even during the time 
when the excitement over Koch's promise 



to cure consumption was greatest. Prof. 
Mason writes : " I was very fortunate in 
having my Japanese friend. Dr. Taraaka, 
with me. Dr. Virchow is a member of Par- 
liament and is the leader of educational re- 
form ; he seems to be carrying the day 
with the emperor. The great point he 
makes, it I understand the mattei', is, that 
so much time spent in the ancient languag- 
es and mathematics does not advance the 
modern ideas as to scientific research, and 
in the Parliament he has taken the Japan- 
ese students who have been with him as 
outrunning all other nations, and they are, 
most all of them, ignorant of Greek and 
Latin. 

My inductions are : 

1st. The institution does not want those 
that reject it, because the examination is 
not stiff enough to suit them. 

2. Our Alma Mater is a State and Na- 
tional institution for young men who are 
anxious to gain an education but who can- 
not afford to spend years and money in 
making the "fit" required by classical in- 
stitutions. 

3. This subject is loaded and it is well 
in discussing it to consider many sides ; 
truth is a crystal with many faces ; each 
face divided into many facets ; sometimes 
one sees the the light reflected from only 
one facet and thinks it is the whole truth. 

/John A. Cutter, M. D., '82. 

1730 Broadway, New York. 



The writer of the foregoing has taken a 
slightly twisted view of this subject. It is 
not the intention or the purpose of any 
right-minded friend of the college, to intro- 
duce languages more extensively into the 
curriculum as entrance requisites, but 
rather to require a more advanced exami- 
nation in the English branches, for it is 
found in nearly every instance that there 
were opportunities of taking a portion of 
the studios pursued here the first year, at 
the High School, at a much less expense to 
the student than for the same time spent 
upon them here, while the time taken up by 
them might be much more profitably spent 
in a more thorough and extended course in 
the higher sciences. — [Ed. 



New York, February 26, 1891. 
I cannot but believe that tiiis question is 
the most serious of any that could be 
asked, and that it vitally affects the future 
and destiny of our college. Bearing the 
seriousness of consequences of any change 
in the curriculum in mind, I must confess 

[Continuetl on page 88.] 



84 



AGGIE LIFE. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Published B'ortnightly by the Students of the 
Mass. Agricultural College. 



Terms $1,00 per year, in advance. 



Single copies, 10c. 



Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 

BOAJBD OJ? JEDITOMS : 

E. P. FELT, Editor-in-Chief, 
O. v. B. "LAGE, Business Manager, 
A. G. EAME.S, '91, H. N. LEGATE, '91, 

J. L. FIELD, 'Ifi, G. E. TAYLOR, '92, 

G. F. CURLET, '9S. 



Address all communications to the Business Manager. 



We would remind our readers that all 
the papers in the reading room are pur- 
chased by different persons, and as owners 
they have a right to the whole of their 
property. We hope that meu who desire 
a certain clipping will consult with the 
purchaser of the paper and thereby avoid 
any ill feeling. 



We are glad to publish several articles 
from the alumni this week. Certainly, as 
a college paper, we should be willing to 
devote space to the discussion of problems 
thai effect the future of the college. We 
hope that none of the alumni will be back- 
ward in cxpi'essing their views, either on 
this question or some other. 



through the fingers, and the unnecessary 
strength put forth to hold the piece in place 
will tend to promote unsteadiness, and this 
alone would oifset the appearance of the 
hands. Tlierefore, greater excellence in 
drilling can be attained by simply throwing 
gloves out of the question, would it not be 
advisable to do so at once? 



There will be a general court martial 
composed of members of the Senior class 
on Friday next, in Lieut. Cornish's recita- 
tion room, to investigate the cause of the 
discomfiture of Co. D on the evening of 
the competitive drill. It is to be hoped 
that the members of the court will leave all 
previous knowledge of the case and per- 
sonal considerations behind them, and be 
guided to a decision entirely by the evi- 
dence. 



Occasionally at drill we hear a captain 
sharply commanding a man to put on his 
gloves. This is perfectly' right and proper, 
as white gloves are a part of the uniform. 
But why has this man ventured to come on 
drill without them? Ask him and he will 
tell you he can drill bettei' without them. 
This same answer would, I think, be given 
by the majority of students. Almost every 
prize drill is carried on without gloves on 
the contestants. Now, if men in this posi- 
tion can drill better with bare hands, it 
stands to reason that the difference would 
be equally marked in every day companv 
drill. It may look nicer to sec white 
gloves throughout the battalion at dress 
parade ; but even then the guns will slip 



The Mary Howe conceit on the evening 
of Monday, the 2d, was greeted by as 
large an audience as the hall could seat. 
The members of the troop were all artists 
of the first order. Mr. T. Adaniowski 
was unfortunately prevented, by illness, 
from taking part in the concert, but his 
numbers were played by his brother. Mr. 
Schnecker's performance on the harp was 
masterly, and that it was appreciated by 
the audience was manifested by the num- 
ber of times he was encored. Some claim 
to have been disappointed with the per- 
formance of Miss Howe herself, but we 
should be slow to criticise so widely recog- 
nized a celebrity. The fact that Miss 
Howe was tired out, having sung for sev- 
eral consecutive nights and made long 
journeys by day, ought to excuse any 
noticeable lack of the sweetness and ani- 
mation which usually characterize her sing- 
ing. That her voice has a wonderful range 
and that she has it most perfectly under 
control, must be patent to all who attended 
the concert Mondav evening. 



That individual prize drills tend to raise 
the standard of the whole corps, no one 
can deny who witnessed the exhibition in 
College Hall, Saturday evening, Feb. 28. 
The improved excellence in individual drill 
over the exhibition of last year was only 
equalled by the greater esprit de corps 
shown by the members of each company. 
The fact that the two companies that came 
out respectively third and fourth iu the 
last drill for the colors, came first and 
second in this, means more than a mere 
reversal of the orders. It was Ihe result 
of hard work by both these companies, and 
that without any deterioration on the part 
of the other companies. The fact that one 
of these latter companies came to grief 
was, undoubtedly, due rather to an un- 
toward train of circumstances than to inefii- 
ciency in marching or manual. Leaving 
out this accident, the work of the whole 
battalion has improved gieatly in the last 
two montlis. The sabre squad made a 
good show for the length of time spent in 
practice, but the hall was too small to 
allow perfect freedom of motion for so 



many files. It was encouraging to see so 
many competitors on the floor in the drill 
for the medal. In behalf of the college we 
wish to thank Fr. Drennan for the inter- 
est he displayed in the battalion, by offer- 
ing this medal. We also congratulate Mr. 
Curley, the victor, on his success. 



If the schedule in the catalogue recently 
issued is followed, the Senior class will 
have twenty-one hours recitation per week, 
during the Spring term. Tliis is an inno- 
vation which we cannot too severely con- 
demn. It has been the custom to make 
the studies of the last term of the Senior 
year less arduous than those of other terms. 
This is as it should be, for there is so 
much to be done in preparing for Com- 
menceinent, that the Seniors do not have 
as much time to devote to the regular 
studies of the course as they have previ- 
ously enjoyed. There are Commencement 
theses and military essays to be written, 
and if a man is fortunate enough to secure 
an appointment for Commencement, his 
work will be greatly increased. Up to the 
present year this condition has been recog- 
nized, and the Senior class has had only 
twelve or fourteen hours recitation. Iwen 
then, to use a slang phrase, they have not 
had a " soft snap." But if the schedule in 
the catalogue is adhered to, they will enjoy 
the unenviable distinction of being the 
hardest worked class in college. It is folly 
to expect that a man who is driven by 
work up to the last moment, will be able 
to do full justice to himself on the Com- 
mencement stage. We hope that some 
arrangement will be made before the begin- 
ning of the next term whereby the class- 
room work of the Senior class can be 
reduced. It does not seem impossible to 
do this, and it is certainly a change imper- 
atively demanded by the circumstances of 
the case. 



As the winter term is almost over and 
Spring with its associations of out-door 
exercise and sport is near at hand, it is 
perhaps timely to begin the discussion of 
matters connected with base-ball. Every 
Spring there are games between the differ- 
ent classes, which are supposed to be for 
the College championship. But as these 
are arranged by challenge and do not have 
official sanction the result is not all that 
could be desired. At the end of the sea- 
sou there are usually two or more classes 
claiming the championship, each of which 
presses its claim with an amount of vocif- 
eration proportional to the weakness of its 



AGGIE LIFE. 



8S 



cause. It seems to us that if the base- 
ball iiiauagenieut would take hold of these 
class games and arrange a regular series 
for the college championship, a two-fold 
result would lie obtained. 'J'he champiou- 
ship system would, for ouce, be definitely 
settled and these games would also serve 
as a valuable means for developing men 
for the college team. Many men would 
play in them who would not otherwise 
appear on the ball field, and it would be 
strange, indeed, if some valuable material 
for the college team could not be found 
among them. There are always two or 
three weeks at the beginning of the season 
when there are no college games. If the 
class games could come off then they would 
not interfere with the practice of the col- 
lege team and would serve as a sort of 
training school for the college players. 
They would also serve the purpose of 
arousing the interest in base-ball early ij 
the season. The trouble has been in the 
past that we did not wake up and become 
enthusiastic about base-b.ill until the sea- 
son was nearly over, and anytbing that 
would tend to remedy this should be 
heartily welcomed. In offering these sug- 
gestions to the management, we feel that 
the sentiment of the college is with us and 
hope soon to hear of some action being 
taken in the matter. 



GLEANINGS. 

March 4, Stockbridge claims to have had 
a kiss. 

Prof. Fernald visited the Hub last Wed- 
nesday. 

Where are the centre lamps in the read- 
ing room? 

Miss Stratton returned to her duties 
last week. 

Feb. 26, — '93 takes a novel bolt on 
Prof. Maynard. 

Ask W. A. Brown if Miss W washed 

his face last week ? 

Feb. 28 — Howard, '93, reviews the bat- 
talion by gas light. 

Guns are now to be made at Worcester 
Institute of Technology. 

The twenty-eighth annual re|)ort of the 
college appeared last week. 

Keith, '94, being ill, was obliged to 
return to his home last week. 

Horner, Higgins, Parker and DufHeld 
were on the sick list last week. 

This term closes Thursday, March 26th. 
Are you ready for examinations? 



Shores and Felt returned last week 
Tuesday from their western trip. 

H. E. Crane, '92, has now fully recov- 
ered from his recent eye trouble. 

The Seniors seem to find plenty of sub- 
jects for dissection at the farm barn. 

Did you notice that Legat(e)ion from 
East street in the balcony, Feb. 2.8? 

We regret the misfortune that led Put- 
nam, '94, to be without a piccolo, Feb. 28. 

The annual report of the President of 
Boston University was issued Jan. 12,1891. 

White, '94, has reformed and now r.p- 
pears at the boarding club three times a 
day. 

Barton '94 tried to wake the dead last 
week, while declaiming. Plenty of noise 
there. 

Lieut. Cornish lectured before the Lev- 
erett Farmers League Friday evening, 
Mar. 6. 

Pictures of the late H. B. Learned may 
be had by leaving order at No. 1, South 
college. 

The Reading Room Tax for this term is 
fixed at 75c. Every man should pay up 
at once. 

Pres. Gates of Amherst college has made 
a score of 278 out of a possible 300 at 
bowling. 

Delegates of the fair sex from North- 
field Seminary were present at the recent 
prize drill. 

Ninety thousand cows have to be milk- 
ed twice a day to supply London alone. 
Water big business it is ! 

Jones & Co., ai'tistic photographers. 
State Experiment Station. Satisfaction 
guaranteed, or money refunded. 

Her little hand so soft and white, 

Ah, liow I longed to win it. 
I called upon her Pa last night, 
And now I am not in it. 

F. W. Park '94 took the first prize at the 
Poverty ball last Friday evening. The 
prize, a cigarette case, is truly a symbol of 
poverty. 

Athletics, Saturday, March 7th. Hori- 
zontal bar, Tinoco '93 1st; Perry '93 2nd. 
Quarter-mile run, Hull, '91, 1st, Fletcher 
'92, 2nd. 

Rev. Austin B. Bassett, formerly pro- 
fessor of mathematics at the Mass. Agr'l 
College, is now pastor of a Congregational 
church in Ware. 

The singing school is quite well attend- 
ed just at present. The introduction of 
College Song books makes the exercise 
doubly interesting. 



Prof. Warner being unable to attend to 
his duties Feb. 26 and 27, the I<"reshnian, 
Junior, and Senior classes were met by 
Lieut. L. W. Cornish instead. 

The bill I'elatiug to the transfer of the 
military property to the trustees of the 
college has passed both houses and only 
awaits the Governoi''s signature. 

A business meeting of the I\I. A. C. A. 
C. M. has been called for March 13. at 4 
o'clock p. M., at the office of llie Secretary 
of the State Board of Agriculttire. 

We notice tl)at the suuw-plow from the 
Botanic Department goes around before 
bieakfast, whenever there is need of it. 
The Farm Management might well profit 
by the good example set them. 

March 4th, Prof. Warner delivered a 
lecture in the town hall. His subject was 
" Meteorology and the Farmer," and he 
seemed to have been favored with a prac- 
tical illustration of its operation. 

Last Friday an Amherst student was 
here selling tickets for their mock trial of 
Mar. 6. If they expect us to patronize 
them in their entertainments, we have at 
least the right to expect a like compliment 
of them. 

The fourth general convention of the 
Phi Sigma Kappa fraternity was held Feb. 
20th, at the rooms of Beta (formerly 
Alden March) chapter at Albany, N. Y. 
G. B. Willard was delegate from Pi 
chapter. 

Last Thursday evening, at the Y. M. C. 
A. E. P. Felt gave a short report of the 
conference of Volunteers held recently at 
Cleveland, Ohio. There were between four 
and five hundred delegates in attendance, 
besides about thirty Missionaries from the 
foreign field and the Secretaries of tlie va- 
rious Foreign Missionary Boards. 

The Mass. Institute of Technology has 
petitioned the Legislature relative to the 
sum of money received from the United 
vStates, now in the hands of the State 
Treasurer, for the benfit of agriculture and 
the mechanic arts. The matter is still in 
the hands of the Committee on Education 
and no hearings have yet been held. 

At a meeting of the Natural History 
Society, held Feb. 24, Dr. Paige gave an 
interesting lecture on dissection. He took 
as a subject, a cat. All through his talk 
he endeavored to show that this line of 
work is very interesting and he succeeded 
in holding the attention of all throughout. 
At the close he was warmly applauded. 



86 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Base-ball practice is can-ied on quite 
vigorously at the drill hall every day. This 
building is not as convenient a place to 
practice in as might be expected. Tlie 
cement floor proves a detriment to base 
balls and shoe leatlier. It also prevents 
the talcing of several other valuable exer- 
cises such as sliding bases. We hope some 
day in the near future to have a cage in 
which to do all our practicing and thus 
lessen the expense incurred by tlie use of 
so many balls, by broken windows and by 
the unnecessary amount of shoe-leather 
uow spoiled. 

At a meeting of the \V. I. L. S., held 
last Friday evening, the question discussed 
was : Resolved that education is a better 
qualification for suffrage than property. 
1st affirmative, F. H. Henderson, 2nd af- 
firmative, E. W. iSIorse, 1st negative, H. 
F. Staples, 2nd negative, A. C. Curtis. 
Weight of argument and merits of the 
question were decided in the affirmative. 
H. J. Fowler gave a declamation, and C. 
L. Brown read an essay. An extempora- 
neous speech was delivered by W. H. 
Eanney. It was voted that the next 
meeting should be the last one of the term. 
The question for the next meeting is : Re- 
solved, that the coloring of oleomargerine 
to imitate butter should be prohibited by 
law. 1st affirmative, W. A. Brown '91, 
2nd affirmative G. F. Curley '93, 1st neg- 
ative, H. M. Howard '91, 2iid negative, 
E. J. Walker '93; declamation, C. P. 
Lounsbury '94 ; reading, F. S. Hoyt '93 ; 
essay, H. G. Stockwell '94. 



PRAYER MEETING TOPICS. 
March 12. Out of the Darkness into the 

Light, Col. 1 : 12-14 ; Rom. S : 1, 38, 

39. H. T. Shores. 
March 15. Excuses, Mat. 22 : 1-15. C. L. 

Brown. 
March 19. How strength is given, John 

15 : 1-8 ; II Cor. 12 : 9. C. H. Barton. 
March 22. The two ways, Mat. 7 : 13, 14, 

24-27. E. P. Felt. 



ALUMNI NOTES. 

Prof. Brooks gave a lecture last Wed- 
nesday on the "Winter Course for Far- 
mers," at the University of Vermont at 
Burlington. 

Dr. H. J. Wheeler '83, chemist for the 
Rhode Island Experiment Station, Mr. 
Coggshall, a member of the Board of Man- 
agers of the same, and Mr. Cushman, 
Apiarist, visited this college recently, and 
expressed tlieniselves as much pleased witli 



the general management of the Station 
here and of the college. 

Prof. R. B. Moore of Ihe Mass. Agr'l 
College of Amherst, gave a valuable and 
interesting address upon '-Stock raising" 
^^''e(Jnesday evening, before the Farmers 
and Mechanics Association. — Worceslei' 
Spy. 

We quote the foregoing from the West- 
minster items of the above paper. Well, 
Robbie, you have a handle for your n.ame 
haven't you? 

P. M. Harwood '75, Supt. of Crystal 
Lake Farm, Ravenna, Ohio. 

Pres. Alvoid and a delegation of Trus- 
tees of the Maryland Agricultural College 
were here week before last. 

J. E. Holt "88, of Suffield, Conn, spent 
March 1st at Aggie. 

Col. H. Kendall '76, of Providence, was 
one of the judges at the prize drill Feb. 28. 

H. Myrick '82, editor of the New Eng- 
land Homestead, represented his paper at 
the prize drill. 

A. L. Miles '89 is secretary of the Rut- 
land Farmers' Club. 

Geo. B. Simonds '90 is secretary of the 
Ashby Grange. 

T. R. Breeu '87, care of Carnegie, 
Phipps & Co., Limited, Munhall, Pa. 



ARCHERY. 

From Cupid's bow an arrow flew 
And pierced the heart of a maid — 

A gallant swain the maiden knew, 
Who gladlj' proffered his aid. 

He took the maiden's hand and said, 
" You may recover from this ;" 

But when in love he saw her dead. 
He stole from her a kiss. 

As Cupid turned and looked again 
From his hiding-place above, 

He drew his bow and shot the swain ; 
Then laughed at the "dead in love." 

Ex. 



THINGS ARE NOT WHAT THEY 
SEEM. 

The day's work is over, the lessons are learned, 
The midnight oil burns low. 
And quiet reigns in Aggieville, 
As it did long years ago. 

Absolute silence prevails, nothing tends 
to disturb the last lingering thoughts, even 
the fierce wind that has been driving the 
snow against the window-pane has ceased. 
[ sit in my chair with elbovvs on the desk 
and meditate complacently on the impor- 
tant and insignificant affairs of our college 
life. I imagine I can see the tide of time 
before me, and I observe how. infallibly we 
are all carried along in its resistless current. 




Business ib bu<^nies» FRANK WOOD will get up 
Spreads for the Boj s this wnitei Send your oiders 
right along to get there first. 



Go to BLODGE IT & CLARK 
for CLOTHS or FURNISHING 
GOODi'. 

They keep the best line and use 
the students well. 

Take youi- laundry to them Mon- 
day or Wednesday morning and 
you will get good work. 

ELOPgETT ^ 6Lft!{K 

JOHN MULLEN. 



-DEALER IN- 



MEATS and PROVISIONS, 

VEGETABLES OF ALL KINDS IN SEASON, 

FISH AND OYSTEES, FOREIGN 

AND DOMESTIC FRUITS, 

AND CANNED 

GOODS. 

Palmer's Block, Main Street. 



E. R. BENNETT, 
Jeweler, 

Optician, 

Watchmaker. 

FINE GOODS! LOW PRICES! 

GOOD WORK WARRANTED. 

First Door from Post Office. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



87 



IF YOU WANT TO GET OYSTERS IN ANY 
STYLE GO TO 

E. B. ARNOLD'S 

ormwx m¥K 

students are attended at siiort notice, 

Open all days of the week until 12 o'clock. 
Sundays from 9 a. m. to 12-30 P. M., and from 
7 P. M. to 11 p. M. 

William's Block, Merchants' Row. 



The title page of this book w;is drawn and engraved by 

John S'^^^i^Sj 

6 Davis Street, BOSTON, MASS. 

The various publications of Bates, Bowdoiu, Colby, 
Tufts, Mass. Agricultural College, Wellesly and Yale 
have used his work. He will submit sketches and cari- 
catures for your approval. 



OFFICE OF 



EDWARD A. THOMAS, 

Flf|E/!(D Life IpRANCE-/GEf(T, 

REAL ESTATE EOR SALE AND TO LET. 



O0ve, CooJcs Block, Amherst, 3Tass, 



GEO. GRAVES, 



DEALER IN 



Pai:nteiis' Supplies 

Personal attention given to Frescoing, Dec- 
orating and Paper Hanging, and all 
Interior and Exterior 
House Painting. 

Pleasant St,, near L, J, Spear's Shop, 



AMHERST COLLEGE 

CO-OPERATIVE 8TEi LAUiBY 

and Carpet Renovaving [stablislinient. 



Aggie Agent, H. M. HOWARD, "91 . 



Work taken Monday delivered Wednesday. 
" " Wednesday delivered Saturday. 

OFFICE AT BRINE'S. 

H. A. UTLEY, Manager. 



Finally my mind wanders upon our future 
work. I think of them who arc al)out to 
start out in life's struggle, and then my 
thoughts are turned to that class which I 
have learned to love so well, and I see that 
they have already commenced to ciioose 
their professions. Son)e aie Botanists, 
quite a few ai'e expert Zoologists, and quite 
a goodly number have determined to be 
chemists, but the question arose in my 
mind, what professions will the otiier part 
of the class pursue, and instantly the 
answer flashes aci'oss my mind, they will 
be musicians, they will work on a hirger 
scale tlian is found in books. But 1 had 
nearly fallen asleep when the faithful old 
clock reminded me that the day was past, 
and I began to realize that the arras of 
INIorpheus were silently drawing me into 
the immediate pro.ximity of Dreamland, and 
I deemed it only fitting and proper that I 
should patronize my bed, where 1 was an- 
ticipating a well-earned rest. I soon lost 
consciousness and much to my discomfort 
I found that I was dreaming. I realized 
that it was a great misfortune but I was 
powerless, and the truth dawned upon me 
for the first time that I have made a mis- 
take in eating a whole mince pie for supper. 
But, alas, I was conscious of everything 
that happened, and the furniture and the 
ornaments on the wall never looked more 
natural, and for a moment my eye rested 
on the splasher over the commode, which 
my best girl had given me, and behold the 
ever familiar motto was missing, and in its 
place the following : 

"Tell me not in mournful numbers 

Life is but an empty dream, 
We have slept on milk and mince pie 

And it did not empty seem." 

And I, for once, thoroughly realized the 
authenticity of this motto, but I had not 
lam long in this hypnotized state, when I 
heard a faint sound. I listened, and I 
heard the sound of a muffled drum and the 
tramp of feet. What was going to happen? 
what were they doing? were the thoughts 
that flashed through m}' mind with wonder- 
ful rapidity. I did not have long to wait, 
however, for soon I heard them stop before 
my door and hold a short consultation. 
Yes, he is the man, I heard them say, and 
silently, one by one, the creatures entered 
my room and assembled around my bed, 
forming one of those wonderful parabolic 
curves that are so hard to describe. .Such 
a sight I had never seen and I was filled 
with terror, for before me stood twelve of 
the most hideous beings imaginable, each 
dressed in gaudy apparel and eacl: cariying 
a lai'ge musical instrument. They spoke 



never a word. At the foot of the bed 
stood a man considerably larger than the 
rest, anil I judged him to be their leader 
for in a moment he waved his hand and 
they all commenced to play, and such in- 
spiring music I had never listened to. In 
fact, it lessened my fear, and I gained 
courage to glance at the title of the music, 
and I read, " Come and join onr b»nd." 
When the music ceased and the last plain- 
tive melody had died away, the leader, with 
a very prepossessing air, began to address 
me in words that even excelled the superb 
utterances of our noted literary men. I 
cannot repeat them verbatim, but this i.s 
the substance of them. You are one of the 
manv men of this dormitory, who are not 
in sympathy with those who desire to make 
things uui'leasant for their neighbors, by 
practising on some musical instrument, and 
as this is an age of oi-ganization and co- 
operation, we have organized this band, 
and we must have the cooperation of every 
student, for examination time is coming 
and by playing continually we will greatly 
benefit those who desire to study. He 
reasoned that the united baud could not 
visit every student, but by having the indi- 
vidual members scattered around in various 
parts of the college the desired results 
might be easily accomplished. As he con- 
tinued I became more and more interested, 
and I began to scrutinize more closely their 
general make up, and I saw that all had 
wings in different stages of maturity, and 
then I knew they were good men, and as 
they played the partiug selection my heart 
was filled with sadness, and as the}' filed 
out, one by one, I made a vow that I would 
do all in my power to promote their general 
welfare. How long a space this occupied 
I know not, for soon I awoke and looked 
around me, it was morning, the sun was 
just peeping over the eastern horizon, and 
a voice within me seemed to say, what a 
glorious opportunity to study before break- 
fast. But my thoughts had scarcely passed 
away, when the monotonous sound of a 
drum broke the silence of the morning, the 
trombone and the bass drum caught the 
influenza and added their musical accompa- 
niment. The daily programme had com- 
menced and my dream and the vow I had 
made flashed vividly across my mind, as I 
tried to concentrate my thoughts upon the 
topics of the day. I was filled with anger, 
and I swore in my heart that there would 
be eternal war between me and my adver- 
saries, especially the mince pie and musi- 
cians, as long as I remained in Aggie. 

H. E. C. 



88 



AGGIE LIFE. 



[Continued from page S3.] 

that it is with extreme reliiclance that I 
give my views on this subject, leeliiig that 
however iiuqualified I maj' be as far as the 
college, jser se, is concerned to render a 
decision, I am too nuich interested in its 
welfaie to abstain from spealving the 
thoughts that I believe will affect our col- 
lege for the best, and assure its higlier and 
stronger position in the world of Education 
ill tiie future. I do believe in raising the 
standard, not of admission alone, but of 
everytiiing else. The very nature and aim 
of this institution is to raise and advance, 
and build for the belter, the young men of 
the state; to make the coming generation, 
abler, nobler and fitter men for this life's 
work than their pi-edecessors have been, 
and to continue, step by step, to build the 
human life of all who come under their 
care, to the goal of perfection in Man. 
Practically considered, the P'aculty them- 
selves, or they and tiie Trustees combined 
must decide, whether or no the raw mate- 
rial on hand is good enough and plenteous 
enough to bear the additional threshing 
process, and leave a suflflcient number 
of students qualified for admission. That 
is a question of "better results vs. possi- 
bly decreased revenues" (but only pos- 
sibly) that they must be the arbiters of, 
and shoulder the responsibility of deciding. 
I believe the young men of to-day are 
better qualified to pass a higher examina- 
tion than their predecessors were, say ten 
years ngo. I believe the public schools are 
doing more of the work now toward pre- 
paring the students for a collegiate life 
than they did then. I believe tho general 
mass of young men are more desirous of 
attaining a higher education, and do more 
to fit themselves for it than they did a 
decade ago. Believing this, I feel it 
wro'Jg to hamper a Faculty and an institu- 
tion charged with such good and much 
needed work with the lower and more ele- 
mentary studies, which do not properly 
belong in its curriculum, and which absorb 
entirely too much time, precious time, 
which is needed for the clo?e study of, and 
attention to the branches of the sciences 
for which this institution properly exists. 
I do not believe in mediocrity. Better 
have fewer graduates, but have every one 
of them an able and thoroughly efficient 
and properly educated man for iiis sphere, 
than many graduates of whom only a few 
attain a high position and in those cases 
mostly by a post-graduate course. 

Advance ! Advance boldly ! State your 
position ! State the facts ! Raise the stand- 



ard of admission ! Let the young men 
who come to you for their learning be 
taught only what the institution is there 
to teach them. The Sciences ! Let them 
get their school education in the schools. 
If they want the classics, let them go 
to the colleges for that work and learn 
it there. Stick to your line of work ! ! 
Make your students come piepared to take 
up that work, but do not waste half or an 
entire year in teaching elementary studies 
that it is not your province to teach. Of 
30ur class of colleges — you stand in the 
van ! Keep youi- position now and in the 
future, as you have in the past, the fii'st 
and best Agricultural College ! To ask 
of a soldier of the line duties that his offi- 
cers cannot perform is absurd. So here — 
Raise the standard ! Raise your class of 
studies, but keep to your line of work. 
You will raise j'our students with yt>n, and 
together, combined and united in the good 
work you are doing, you will help the 
world to its higher ideal, by laying many a 
solid stone in the grand edifice of Educa- 
tional Progress and Reform. 

Alfred W. Ldblin, '84. 



ATHLETICS, 

Saturday, Feb. 28th. 
Broad jump — E. T. Clark '92, 1st ; J. B. 

Hull '91, 2d. 
Potato race — J. B. Hull '91, 1st; E. T. 

Clark '92, 2d. 



MAILS. 
Mail leaves college for P. O. at 1 p. m. 
and 7 p. m. on week days. On Sunday it 
leaves at 4-45 p. m. At the P. O. mails 
close as follows : 

Boston. 

7-45, 8-30,10-15 a.m. ; 4-00, 6-45, 7-45p.m. 

Neiv York. Western and Southern States. 

7-45, 10-16 A. M. ; 4-00. 6-45, 7-45 p. m. 

Northampton. Springfield and Western 

Massachusetts. 

7-20, 10-15, 10-45 A. M. ; 6-45 p. m. 

Northern way. N. L. Northern. 

8-30 A. M. 

The treasurer will be at his office from 4 

to 5 p. M. on .Saturdays throughout the 

term . 

The museum of natural history will be 
open to visitors from 1-30 to 3-30 each 
afternoon excepting Satuixlay and Suuday. 
The college library will be open from 2 
to 4 p. M. and from 6 to 8 p. m. each day, 
excepting Saturday ann Sunday. On Sat- 
urday it will be open from 9 to 12 a. m. and 
from 2 to 4 p. m., and on Sunday from 2 
to 3 p. M. 

President Goodell will be at his office 
from 2 to 4 p. m. every afternoon except 
Saturday and Sunday. 



K B, DKKII]SOI], D, D, S, 



KELLOGG'S BLOCK, 



AMHEEST, MASS. 



Office Hours, 9 to 12 a. m., 1-30 to 5 p. M. 



JK^Etber and Nitrous Oxide Gas administered when 
desired. 



.A-i: TUB 



jlMHERST GASH SHOE STORE, 

Tou can i?et tlie most for your money. 
BOOTS AND SHOES, RUBBERS, OVER- 
SHOES, SLIPPERS, TRUNKS, 
AND BAGS. 



REPAIRING NEATLY DONE, 
HAWES & STINSON, 

CASH EOW, AMHEEST, MASS. 



AMHERST HOUSE 



LIYERY, FEED, /ND SALE STABLE, 



T. L PAIGE, Prop'r 



HACKS TO AND FROM ALL TRAINS, OM- 
NIBUSES, HACKS, DOUBLE AND 
SINGLE TEAMS FURNISHED 
AT SHORT NOTICE, 
CAREFUL DRIVERS. FAIR PRICES. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



Sheet Mnsic, 



Miasic TBookf^, 



String's 

FOll THE VIOLIN, BANJO, GUITAR, 



Ciishman's Music Store, 



A.IvIMBE.ST. 



WAITE k SON, 



»TTERg M]B ¥\]miM% Books and Stationery, 



F7OWES ^ I^BIiLOGG, 



1>KALKUS IN 



-^■2TfUDEr]T'S SUPPLIE?/-:- 

FANCY GROCERIES, (:R0(■KE1^Y, ('[(i.MiS, 

CIGARETTES, TOBACCO. FRUITS 

AND CONFECTIONERY, 

M-n^P gOODS fiI]D KEP^OSEI]E OIL, 

3Do(ir.i Urmth of J\ O., - AMaERST, MASS. 



EDWIN NELSON. 



AND IJHALKltS IN 



Hats, Caps, Furs, Trunks, Bags, Furnisliini Goods, 

Latest Styles in Furnishings. Agent for 

Knox's and Youman's Hats. Sole 

Agent for Pittsfield 

Laundry. 

Hats Repaired Furs Renovated 

Give us a call bclovi^ purchasing. 

NO, i> macxTx row, amjibh^t, mass. 



%m\m^i Mouse, 



AjrHERST, MASS. 



The undersigned is pleased to announce 
to his former patrons and others desiring 
Game Spreads or Dinners, that he is always 
prepared to accomodate (at short notice) 
lai'ge or small parties. 

Ample dining room capacity for 200 peo- 
ple. 

LORENZO CHASE, Prop'R, . 



.<t. DENTISTS. ^5,., 

C. S. GA'1\ES, D. D. S. 
T. G. HUNTmCr TON, D. D. S. 

cuTi.EJt's ht.ocii, AMiiEitsr, mass. 



OFFICE HOURS: 
' D .^^. is/s:. TO 5 I=. iwr. 

Etiier and Nitrous OxUlc adiniiiistered ■\vlieii 
<lcKh'ecl. 



Next door to Fost Office, 
AMHERST, MASS. 



WOOD'S HOUSE 

Htirt DrtEgsiijg E.oorr]g, 

Eazors Honed and Shears Sharpened at 
short notice. 

ABIirERST, MASS. 



G. R KENFIELD, 

-»JEWELE1^,«^ 



t \ / I 



H 



H 



pieicM Tailor, 



-A-D^HEIIST, 



3VC.A.&3S, 



ll'on(7'.s- nliirk. 



.i niln'fstf Mftsa. 



A Stem WimI .-11111 Set ^^^■lltll;lnl, H;im|iilcn. ICIs'in ov 11 
linois ininonu'iit in a (mjIiI Filled (Jii-st,- Cur s^l.'j.Od. 



Umbrellas covi'red ^vtiilc you \v:\\t. also dralcr 
ill Guns. RitlfS. Aiiiiiiniritiuii niiil Sporliini' Goods 
of all kinds. .ViiiateMii' I'liotoi;i-apliic (_)nt(its and 
Supplies. \'iL-\vs and Fictures taken -wlu'ii de- 
sired. A'ie"\vs of Amherst and Vicinity for sale. 
Call and see before purchasinj; clscAvliere. 

iB'WATCH Ar« CLCCK REPAIRmG A' SPECIALTY. JSir 



J. T.. LOVELL, 

^PHOTOgpPHBI^,^ 

DRY PLATES, COMPOUND DEVELOPER 

AND SEN'SITIZED PAPER, READY 

FOR USE. 



PRINTING FOR AMATEURS 



Done in the best manner. 



tMllEJtsr, ,VASS. 



el. p. F^AWSON, 



DEALKI! IN 



WMgSES, SLOgKS, JEWELI^Y 

FINE POCKET CUTLERY, SILVER AND 

PLATED WARE, OPTICAL GOODS 

CANES, SP(JRT'ING AND 

FANCY GOODS, 

Gold Pens, Fine Stationery 



REPARING NEATLY and PROMPTLY DONE. 



AMHERST, MASS. 



DWIGHIP ffiOOI^E, 



BILLIARD AND POOL 



Jr^.A-JrwX_iCI5±^, 



3 I'Jtwnix Moir (Up-atairs )f 
AMHERST, MASS, 



Massachusetts Agricultural College, 



•m 







iVxxi^hoi^^st, J\J]o^«»^i 




VOL. I. 



AMHERST, MASS., MARCH 25, 1891. 



NO. 13. 



k 



E, 



AMHERST, - - MASS. 



Mass, AcfjicuLTURAL College, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHERST, MASS. 

We would iufonu the friends of the college, 
and the pnblio generally, that we are prepared 
to supply 

FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND 
SHRUBS, SMALL ERUITS AND 

PLANTS, 
true to name, also 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 
all at the lowest price. 
For Trees, Plants, Shi'ubs, Flowers and Small 
Fruits, address. 

Prof. S. T, Maynard, 

AMHERST. MASS 



THE AMHERST 



FURIilTURE /ND CARPET STORE, 



A complete line of goods suited to the students' 
wants. 



BEDSTEADS, MATTRESSES, PILLOWS, 



STUDY DESKS AND CHAIRS, 
LOUNGES 



C, H. SANDERSON k CO,, 



CASH DEALER,S IN 



Hats, Caps, Umbrellas.'AND Gents' 
Furnishing Goods. 



CASH. ROW, 



AMHERST. 



SyiNDEI|SOH k 

0.\Sn UEALI 

Dry and Fancy Goods, 



0.\Sn DEALERS IN 



HOSIERY, RIBBONS, 'AND SMALL 
WARES OF ALL KINDS. 



AMHERST, MASS. 



BOOTS#SHOES 

FOR EVERYBODY. 



WINDOW SHADES, DRAPERIES, 

CARPETS, RUGS, ETC., ETC. 



iU t/afjtfs Sfrlcth/ Cash and nt Tjinvest fvifes. 



J^l D. MARSH, 



10 rucENix now, 



AMHEUST, M.ASS. 



A riSK UNE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, 
BALS. AND CONGRESS, 

A FULL LINE OF 

liTJBBEI?, C3-OOI3S, 

l''()()T-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 

Repairing Done Promptly. 
T, \V. SLOAN, 

2 THCENIX MOW. 



S, J, SULLIVAN, 

JEAT.ER IN 

Second' Hand Clothes 

AND 

FURI^ITUEE. 

JE^Orders promptly attended to.,^ 
I'. 0. Box. aU) AMHERST, MASS. 



■WHERE DO YOU BOY m\ 

Meerschaum Pipes? 
Erencli Briar Pipes ? 
Choice Tobacco? 
Sponges? 
Soap? 

Hair Brushes from 25 cts. up? 
Combs from 5 cts. up? 
Clioice New Yorli Confectionery? 
Sliaving' Mugs? 
Sliaving Soap? 
Lather Brushes? 

Cigarettes, fresli every two weeks? 
Tlie Best Soda in America? 
Tlie Best Bay Rum? , 
Imported Perfumes? 
Prescriptions xjrepared by licensed pliarmacists? 
Imported Domestic Tooth Bruslies? 

If yon have not obtained tliese necessaries at 
DEUEL'S DRUG STORE, you have begun 
wrong. Denel's is tlie leadiiig Drug Store in 
Western Mass., and keeps the largest assort- 
ment of goods at bottom prices. 



DEUEL'S D1& STORE, 

Amherst House Block, Amherst, ilass. 



HENRY ADAMS, 

PHARMACIST. 

NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, - - AMHERST, MASS. 

Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

EANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORT- 
ED AND DOMESTIC CIGARS, 
CIGARETTES, ETC., 
MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, 
FISHING TACKLE AND SPORTING GOODS, 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, and Sporting 
and Springfield Rifles. 

Sunday and night calls responded to at resi- 
dence, first door'west of Wood's Hotel. 

(Drugs, Medicines, 

TOILET ARTICLES, 

CONPEC'l'IONBRY, CIGARS, CIGARETTES 

AND SMOKERS' GOODS. 



rifysicrixs' I'jtitSCJtirrioxs cake- 
puT.i-r conrroirNDED, 



% PHfti^npgY, 



C I'HOSNIX ROW. 

(Irdcr your COAl here. 



AGGIE 




VOL. I. 



AMHERST, MASS., MARCH 25, 1891. 



No. 12 



A REFLECTION 

All is silent and still when the old town clock 
Strikes the midnight hour so slow, 
■ And the moon sends its beams from a cloudless 
sky 
On the sleeping earth below. 

As I hurry along through the entry, 

My eyes glance beneath the stair, 
And I see mid the gloom and the darkness 

The letter-box standing there. 

I remain for an instant to ponder 

As the minutes quickly fly 
On this time-honored object before me, 

This relic of days gone by. 

And I think of the hundreds of letters 

Dropped into the box every day, 
Letters for home and for loved ones, 

Letters for lands far away. 

There is often a message of gladness. 

Cheering one's heart as it goes. 
And again come the cries of the weary, 

And tales of sorrows and woes.' 

When our college life here is completed, 
And we are encompassed by cares, 

Ah, who will think then of the letter-box. 
In the entry under the stairs. 

C. F. W. 



THE MIND ITS OWN EDUCATOR. 

There is a vague notion widely prevalent 
that colleges are able, by a power inherent 
in themselves, to fill the mind with learn- 
ing ; or, that knowledge is to be received 
inertly, like.tlie influence of the atmosphere, 
by a mere residence at the place or! instruc- 
tion. This idea is apt to exist in the 
minds of many when they first enter col- 
lege. But it is a sad mistake. Something 
in this way, doubtless, tnay be effected, as 
a person cannot pass his time, for a few 
years, in college, without catching some- 
thing from the inspiration of the place. 
But, comparatively, it amounts to but little. 

It is a fact, that the most elaborate and 
manifold methods of instruction can impart 
nothing of importance to a passive and 
inert mind. 

The processes of instruction are, at best, 
but means and aids, of immense impor- 
tance it is true, but they presuppose in 
the mind to which they are applied an 
active, self-moving co-operation. If all 
the means of education, which are scat- 
tered over tlie world, and if all the philoso- 
phers and instructors of ancient and modern 
times, were to be collected together, and 



made to bring their combined efforts to 
bear upon an individual, all they could do 
would be to afford the opjyortimity of im- 
provement. They could notgive him a sin- 
gle valuable tiiought independent of his own 
exertion. Knowledge must be gained, if it 
isgaiued at all,by the stiain upon one's own 
sinews, by the indomitable resolution of 
the will. 

To increase the field of knowledge, this 
rule, as stated by Rev. C. B. Hulbert, must 
be followed, " Use the power you have, if 
you want more, use it normally ; use it up 
to the point of bearing and not beyond." 
This is the law of development by use, and 
to deny this law is to confront a divine 
decree. Thus it is evident if one wishes to 
make the most of his college course, he 
must work ; he must pursue his object per- 
severingly and remorselessly. 

C. H. J. 



ORIGINALITY. 

Originality of thought. What is it? 
The word orignal as applied to man signi- 
fies one who has new and striking ideas ; 
one who has the power and boldness to 
penetrate new lines of thought. He does 
not create anything, but discovers new 
combinations and adaptations of the exist- 
ing bodies of knowledge. 

The discovery of the Western World 
was due to the originality of an aspiring 
young man who, declining to accept the 
reasoning of others as conclusive, but 
thinking for himself, and acting on his 
convictions, accomplished a feat which to- 
day the nations of the globe unite to 
celebrate. 

Originality is the source of invention as 
well as of discovery. If a man is to make 
the world better for his havug lived in it, 
if it becomes his fortune to add to its ca- 
pabilities and resources, it will be through 
his faculity of original thinking. 

Whence comes the present development 
of the science of Mathematics but from the 
originality and inventive genius of such 
minds as those of Archimedes, Euclid, De 
Morgan and Todluinter. By a new com- 
bination of the elements of truth, — the 
square, the triangle, the hypotheneuse — a 
new proposition in geometry is discovered. 
The originality consists in looking at the 
lines and angles in a certain new relation. 



and then drawing the conclusion. And 
what would be the condition in the scienti- 
fic field of the botanist wei'e it not for the 
studies and researches of men like Tourne- 
fort, Linnses, Darwin and Humboldt? 

So in the various other departments of 
science — chemistry, geology, zoology, ento- 
mology and veterinary science ; they have 
all been built up by the tlioughtful earnest- 
ness and perseverance of men, who, after 
acquiring the known facts in their respec- 
tive branches augment them little by little 
from the fruits of their own indefatigable 
labors. 

And so we see the sciences occupying 
an important place in college courses that 
men may be trained to observe and reason, 
and go into the world to discover new facts 
and reveal new relations of cause and 
effect. 

The shallow- minded man does not 
trouble his brain with the why and where- 
fore of a thing and when he wishes to im- 
part to another the knowledge of some- 
thing lie has heard or read, he is obliged 
to confess that he failed to comprehend the 
idea and now ho is unable to remember ex- 
actly what it was. One feels that it is a 
waste of time to attempt conversation with 
such a man and his company is not sought. 
On the other hand, he who absorbs facts 
and, pondering upon them, discusses their 
relations and importance in practical life, is 
always entertaining and eagerly consulted 
by those in search of truth. 

Originality of thought may be cultivated 
by studying every subject that comes up 
and turning it over in the mind until some 
definite conclusion is reached regarding it. 
Whether a newspaper article, or a defini- 
tion from the text book, it was not brought 
to your attention, as food to the little feath- 
erless open-mouthed bird to be swallowed 
whole regardless of its character, but rather, 
if worth reading at all, it should be weigh- 
ed, classified, and tested as to its truth and 
logical significance. 

Idleness is an enemy most minds have 
to fight, and a good weapon is some speci- 
al line of thought with which to engage the 
attention. The mind of the original man 
is ever active and on the alert for new re- 
lations, and always has something novel 
and interesting to offer. He whose origi- 
nality does most for the world's progress 



go 



AGGIE LIFE. 



is an intense thinker. It is said that Dan- 
iel Webstei' sometimes thought witli so 
much rapidity and earnestness over his 
powerful angumeuts that his forehead be- 
came as cold as marble. 

Great things have been accomplished by 
this art of making new arrangements and 
combinations, and reasoning into new 
fields. The apple falls ■ upon your 
head in vain unless thought grapples with 
the facts and makes them tell the stor^' of 
terrestrial gravitation. One generation 
takes up the work where tlie preceding 
one left off. Our present civilization is but 
the result of the advance made by original 
thinkers gone before. One original step 
leads to another. A Grecian shepherd 
drew a string over a hollow box and strik- 
ing it, produced a tone. A Roman think- 
er improved upon the shape of the box and 
adding another string, named the instru- 
ment a cithara. A Spaniard changed it 
to a guita ; a Frenchman lo a spinnet ; an 
Italian to a harpsichord ; then as the re- 
sult of a German's originality, we have the 
piano. Who shall say what shall come 
next? 

"And step by step, since time began, 
We see the steady gain of man." 
Whatever the vocation in life there un- 
doubtedly remains much in the way of de- 
velopment that still awaits the hand and 
brain of original thinkers ; there are yet 
myriads of questions to be settled, causes 
to be discovered, notions to be exploded, 
and victories to be won ere we can have 
any idea of perfection. 

W. A. B. 



A BOOK. 

"Of the making of books there is no 
end." One realizes the truth of this quo- 
tation as he sees a newspaper item stating 
that in 1890 there were 4,5.59 new books 
published in or imported into the United 
States. 

Of tliis great number 3,180 were new 
books, the rest new editions and importa- 
tions. Did you ever think of the amount 
of labor necessary to make one book, to say 
nothing of this vast number? Probably 
our Index editors can appreciate this if no 
one else can. 

To make even a third-class book a man 
must have n thorough knowledge of the 
English language, of the rules of rhetoric 
and besides this a special knowledge of 
the subject on which he is writing. 

It takes time, labor, and money for the 
accumulation of material, time and labor 
for the writing the first draft, and then 



there is the labor of finishing, correcting 
and polisliing off. 

It would seem that the author's labor was 
now done, bat he still has to find a pub- 
lisher, a hard uudertaking for a young 
writer especially, and perhaps he has to 
read the proof. Besides this there is the 
anxiety as to how the public will receive 
his work. So much for the author. 

Leaving the work of making the paper, 
ink, type and presses out of consideration 
we come to the compositors' labor. Any- 
one who has frequented printing offices 
knows what a comparatively slow job that 
is. After the proof is read and the neces- 
sary corrections have been made there is 
the labor of making up the book, that is, 
arranging the matter so that the pages 
shall come in properly. Then the great 
press is set to work, some times after ster- 
eotype plates have been cast, sometimes 
with simple type. After this comes the 
folding, binding and cutting of the book 
before it is placed on the market. If there 
are illustrations, they have to be designed, 
drawn, and engraved at a great expense. 

Thus we see that the production of a 
book demands the united efforts of many 
men for a long time. The statistics of the 
labor necessary for the manufacture of the 
literature of the world for a year would be 
interesting. 

But to return to our newspaper item. 
Wc find that of the 3,180 new books nine 
hundred and thirty-five were works of 
fiction. It wonld be safe to say that near- 
ly one-half of these were utterly useless, ex- 
cept to kill time. Of the remaining five 
hundred probably less than fifty will be 
known a century hence. 

But these books are here and are an in- 
dex of the character and tastes of our peo- 
ple. Although it is not a good plan to 
read new literature exclusively or even to 
read much of it, still we should try to read 
some of the best of the recent publications 
in order to know the present age and the 
subjects that interest the people. It is 
coming to be a fashion, to write novels for 
the purpose of discussing the problems of 
the day. 

Of the other than flclictious works, as a 
general rule the latest are the best, especi- 
ally in scientific books. Of course many 
of our older histories, biographies, books 
of travel, etc., will never be surpassed but 
on the whole the av erage work of each 
year is better than that of the preceding. 
Of the whole number of books published 
in a year no man can read a tithe or scarce 
a hundredth. In what we do read therefore 



we should take great care to get only the 
best and that which will be a benefit to us 
in years to come. 

F. L. G. 



STUDENT AIDS. 

There is probably no student here at 
Aggie who does not desire to stand well in 
his class, and who does not wish to derive 
all the benefit possible during his college 
course. Therefore we are always on the 
lookout for anything that will aid us in our 
work. We do not always take advantage 
of these helps, but to a certain extent we 
make use of whatever we think will help 
us. If a student thinks that hard study 
will aid him, he studies hard, or at least 
makes an attempt at it. If he thinks thai 
by taking an active part in athletic sports 
he will improve in health so as to be able 
to bear the strain of excessive brain work, 
he acts accordingly. And so on down the 
list even to "cribbing." If he thinks that 
"cribbing" is going to help him, he "cribs." 

Now there are some helps for us which 
many fail to realize the importance of, and 
so fail to reap the benefit which might be 
gathered from them. If a student knows 
of any of these helps, he should tell other 
students about them, hence the object of 
this article. There has been one thing 
which has been a great help to the writer 
since he came to Aggie, and it is one of 
those helps which some of the students do 
not take advantage of. I refer to the 
Bible study every Sunday morning at 9-15, 
under the direction of Prof. Mills. The 
attendance is not as large as it should be 
but I think that those who do attend are 
well repaid, and so every student in college 
would be, whether a Christian, or not, as 
Prof. Mills draws out the points in the les- 
sons so that we can apply them practically 
to our work here in college. 

Perhaps some will say that they cannot 
spare the time ; that Sundaj' is a short day, 
and they must use what little time they 
have in writing letters, reading, or — in 
studying lessons assigned for Monday. 
Most of those who do attend can testify 
that it is time well spent, and that Monday 
morning they can go to their studies with 
a more cheerful spirit and with a stronger 
determination to do their best than if that 
hour had been spent in studying the week- 
day lessons, and consequently they are able 
to make more progress than they ohterwise 
would. So much for looking at it as a help 
for a higher standing in our classes. But 
we have come here for a far greater object 
than to stand well in our classes ; we 



AGGIE LIFE. 



91 



have come here iu order to acquire 
knowledge, bath practical and theoretical, 
so that we may, as fully as possible, be 
prepared for the work which lies before lis 
when we leave Aggie College. la order to 
prepare for that work, no one will say that 
we can afford to neglect our moral training. 
Where can we better obtain that training 
than by studying the Bible, with Prof. 
Mills to assist us? 

To those who think that they can do 
better than to employ their time in attend- 
ing these Bible studies, I will say that there 
are a number of us who would be much 
obliged for information as to how you em- 
ploy it, that we may take advantage of it 
and employ our time more profitably than 
we now do, if such a thing is possible. But 
if you think that you cannot do better, we 
cordially invite you to be present with us 
hereafter every Sunday morning whenever 
possible. 

E. W. M, 



COMMENCEMENT. 

In the course of a morning spent in por- 
ing over pages devoted to the early history 
of our college, we found a program of a 
prize contest, in original orations, by mem- 
bers of the Junior class, held during the 
year 1871, the year when the "pioneer 
class" of this institution graduated. By 
whom this prize was offered and why com- 
petition in rendering original theses was 
discontinued we do not know, nor can we 
conceive of any reason why a practice 
that would give incentive to excellence in 
so useful a department of education should 
be abolished. 

We have, every year, it is true, public 
contests in declamation, but these are mere- 
ly elocutionary, consisting of rendering the 
productions of others, and necessitating 
no original thought and comparatively lit- 
tle mental endeavor. Again, we have con- 
siderable practice in expressing our 
thoughts in writing, but the only induce- 
ments to become good writers held out to 
men before the Senior year are editorships 
on the Index and Life boards. Now while 
positions on these staffs are in every way 
desirable and are being earnestly sought af- 
ter, they entail too much work after they have 
been attained to incite very many of the 
fellows to their highest endeavors in order 
to become editors. The honor exacts pay- 
ment in advance, as one may say, and a 
rental as it goes along. 

In the Senior year there begins to be 
some competition and Commencement parts 
are held up as the end in view,butis it prob- 



able that in the fourth year the student will 
become proficient in that which he consid- 
ered a necessary evil iu the three years 
previous? If he be ambitious he keeps to 
the work as best he may, but as the 
time for entering on the labors incident 
to writing his graduation thesis draws 
near he begins to wish that his literary 
instruction had been more thorough. 
Nor does the trouble end when the 
essay is complete. It is far easier to de- 
liver the product of some other man's pen 
than of one's own. One's own thoughts 
sound insipid and lifeless when put into 
words, and this insipidity only wears away 
with continuous practice, not of one such 
writing, but of many. But as far as our 
regular college duties are concerned Com- 
mencement Day is the first appearance in 
public of our student to deliver an original 
thesis. 

What is needed to elevate our literary 
standard is some emolument to animate 
the lower classes to higher etfort in this 
line. Our Faculty are doing all that they 
can for us under the circumstances, but a 
prize for excellence in combined writing 
and speaking would have a most telling ef- 
fect. Here is a chance for some patriotic 
Alumnus. 

The Seniors have already enough to do, 
and as the Kendall Prize Speaking termin- 
ates the year for both lower classes a 
prize could be most appropriately offered to 
the Junior class, for in the Junior year the 
interest in these branches is at the lowest 
ebb, and any thing that .will kindle this 
interest anew will be of incalculable value 
in the Senior year. 

A. G. E. 



COLLEGE ORGANIZATIONS. 

One of the characteristics of the people 
of the nineteenth century is their love of 
organization. The truth of this statement 
is evident to every practical observer of the 
present condition of society throughout the 
world. Everywhere is the power of organ- 
ization felt and heard, both in civilized and 
uncivilized countries. Every trade and 
occupation, every stage of social or politi- 
cal life, the strong and weak, the rich and 
poor, the good and bad, each has its own 
peculiar organizations by which it advances 
its own interests. It is a recognized fact 
that many tilings whicli a number of men 
are unable to accomplish by their individual 
efforts, they may accomplish by combining 
their energies and acting as a single body 
for a single cause. 



Whether or not the world would be better 
off without organizations is a question that 
may be disputed. There probably was a 
time, long before the age of history, when 
every man lived for himself, and depended 
on his own individual efforts for his subsis- 
tence, -but such a state of affairs can never 
again exist, unless there should be a radical 
change in the present laws governing 
society. 

That organization has done much 
good, there is no doubt. That it has 
also done much harm is not to be disputed. 
The present condition of Ireland and of 
Russia gives good examples of ihe power 
of ])olitical organization. Headed by the 
ablest men of society, supported by the 
earnings of thousands of dependents, these 
organizations, created for the express pur- 
pose of antagonizing each other, often 
conflict which causes a great loss of time, 
extensive destruction of property, and not 
infrequently sad loss of life. 

But by no means is organization confined 
to politics alone. Look at the struggles 
between labor and capital ; have we not a 
similar condition of afl^'airs? Nor is organ- 
ization confined to the business world alone ; 
have we not, scattered all over the land, 
societies and clubs whose sole object is the 
further instruction of its members in liter- 
ature, art, or the sciences? Trulj' can we 
say that the coming century will be an era 
of organizations throughout the whole civ- 
ilized world, and that it will rest upon the 
leaders, whether or not the human race 
will thereby be benefited. 

In the college world the power of organ- 
ization is felt no less than in public life. 
Upon his entrance to college the student is 
called upon to examine into the merits of a 
large number of clubs and societies, each 
with its particular object. He must decide 
first, whether or not it would be advisable 
for him to connect himseft at all with any 
such body ; and, secondly, if so, which 
would be most profitable for him to select. 
In answering these questions he should 
clearly realize that the men who will be 
called upon to govern the organizations of 
the twentieth century are novr students in 
our colleges, and that the man who will 
successfully lead his fellow citizens will be 
the man who has had the most experience 
in that direction during his college course 
— the man who has learned how to mingle 
with his fellows, who has the sympathy and 
insight to seize upon the new ideas which 
have within them the power to move the 
world to action ; this is the man that will 
lead. C. F. W. 



92 



AGGIE LIFE. 



PublisliecT Fortnightly b.y tlie Students of the 
Mass. Ao'ricultural College. 



Terms $1,00 per year, in advance. 



Single copies, 10c. 



Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 



BOAjm OJT MDITOMS : 

E. P. FELT, Editor-in-Chief, 
O. V. B. LAGE, Business Manager, 
A. G. EAMES, '91, H. N. LEGATE, '91, 

J. L. FIELD, '92, G. E. TAYLOR, '92, 

G. F. CUELEY, '93. 



Address all communications to the Business Manager. 



When commenting on the prize drill, in 
last issue, one matter in connection with it 
so absorbed our attention that the perform- 
ance of the college band that evening was 
overlooked. We hope tiie members of that 
organization will excuse us. The band 
was certainly a feature of the evening. It 
was its first appearance in public and it 
acquitted itself with honor to its members 
and the college. It was too bad that the 
piccolo was left behind, however, for Put- 
nam's performance on that was missed by 
all who have heard the band practice. 



A WORD to contributors may not be out 
of place, and may make it easier for the 
editor and the printer. In the first place, 
when you write an article, choose a subject 
3-ou know something about and then write. 
Next read your article carefully aud correct 
all mistakes, then look it over and see 
what it means, and if it cannot be stated 
in a more clear, concise manner, copy it 
•plainly on good paper, writing on one side 
only, and hand it to the editor at least one 
week before you expect to see it in print. 
Every man should go through the foregoing 
process, at least,' twice a term. If your 
articles are not piinted, keep at it until you 
can produce such articles as the editor will 
be glad to accept. Very few men are born 
writers. A genius is usually oue of the 
hardest working men on the face of the 
earth. If you would succeed as a writer, 
do not be afraid of hard work. 



Through the exertions of Pres. Goodell 
an arrangement has been made which will 
enable us to have access to the Amherst 
College library. This is a library more 
than four tiuies the size of our own, and rich 
in volumes on literature aiid the fine arts, 
branches in which our own is lamentably 
deficient. Access to this collection cannot 
fail to be of gi'eat value to those desiring 
to pay particular attention to literature. 
Amherst students will be allowed to draw 



books from our library on the same terms 
that we are subject to in drawing from 
theirs. Our library, though deficient in the 
arts, is peculiarly rich in the sciences and 
especially in chemistry, so the advantage 
will not be wholly one-sided. We are 
indebted to President Gates for the liberal 
and progressive spirit which he has shown 
in the matter, and with President Goodell 
he should share the gratitude of the stu- 
dents of both institutions. 



The vacation is n.ow at hand, and it re- 
mains for us to decide how we shall use it. 
Some of the more needy ones will, perhaps, 
from force of circumstances, improve their 
time in working, thus earning something 
for a start on the coming term. More of 
us will undoubtedly consider it a proper 
and convenient time to work up on some 
subjects which we neglected during the 
term. But the old adage bidding us "let 
the dust settle on the books in vacation," 
seems to me to be advice which ought to 
demand our attention. 

After three months of persistent research 
the mind is really in need of rest, the body 
is more or less fagged out and the whole 
system demands repose'. If we do not take 
advantage of the opportunities offered for 
this purpose, then these demands will be 
useless and a wearing on the constitution 
will be the result. While some may be 
strong enough to stand the strain of cease- 
less labor the whole year, the majority of 
us would break down under the strain. 

So if you have due respect for your health 
you will go homo this vacation, have a 
good joyful rest, aud come back the first 
day of the term feeling refreshed and read}' 
to enter upon the assigned duties with re- 
doubled vigor. 



Next tei m the paper passes into new 
hands, and as the old board retires it gladly 
resigns the editorial chair to others, 
yet, while Aggie Life has demanded time 
from other things and kept her editors 
very busy, still they leained to love Ihe 
work, and it is with a tinge of sadness that 
they give way to others. The retii'iug 
editors wish to thank the students for the 
honor confei'red upon them as the first 
board of editors, aud not only for the 
honor, but for the hearty support received 
from all. While the board has made many 
mistakes, still the students have ever stood 
by their paper. The new board of editors 
will do their duty, but they must have the 
support of the whole college, in order to 
reach the highest success. The failures of 



the retiring board should be carefully con- 
sidered and avoided in the future. But 
even the new board of editors cannot write 
the whole paper, aud in fact they should 
hardly be expected to do any writing, as 
there is work enough for them aside from 
writing articles, the news column, the edi- 
torial page and the proof reading properly 
belongs to them, and this is much less sat- 
isfactory work than the production of arti- 
cles. Next term is a short one ; the weeks 
will fly, but let every student determine to 
hand in at least two articles during the term. 
A number of men should prepare articles this 
vacation and have them ready for the first 
issue. Again, though the honor of being 
an editor of a college publication should 
stimulate a man to his best efforts, remem- 
ber that no man is perfect, and flavor your 
criticism with consideration. 



It has lately come to be a custom in 
some colleges for members of the Faculty 
to give short talks on topics of the day, 
after chapel before the classes go to recita- 
tions. This custom has a good effect in 
many ways. The ordinary topics of every 
day interest are presented to the students 
in a manner which is calculated to arouse 
their interest and set them to thinking for 
themselves. They are in this way led to 
read the papers and keep well informed on 
matters of daily interest. This, of its«lf, 
is no small thing, for we see many students 
who, immersed in study, read nothing but 
text books and are woefully ignorant of 
even the most important events which are 
taking place from day to day. It may be 
objected that time would be required for 
this which should be given to study and 
recitation, but once or twice a week would 
make but little difference in the long run. The 
time might easily be made up by a little in- 
cre.ase in the speed of the lectures, and even 
if it were wholly lost the good received would 
more than compensate for the harm done 
in this way. We see with what enthusiasm 
the occasional communications directly 
concerning the college are received by the 
students, and it seems probable that the 
same interest would be manifested in the 
case of the talks referred to. .The aim of 
the college should be not to graduate 
specialists, but well informed and intellect- 
ually symmetrical men. It seems to us 
that short lectures, such as we have spoken 
of, would aid materially to bring about 
such a result and we hope that the Faculty 
will give the matter their careful considera- 
tion. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



93 



GLEANINGS. 

ATHLETICS FOR THE TERM. 

One-half Mile Run : 

1st, Clark '92 ; time 2 min. 32 sec. 

3ud, 
Running Bigh Jump : 

1st, Sanford '94. 

2ik1, Taylor '92, 
Mile Walk: 

1st, Paige '91 ; 8 miu. 45 sec. 

2iid, Legate '91 ; 8 min. 55 sec. 
High Kick : 

1st, Hull '91 ; 8 ft. 11 in. 

2nd, Crane '92 ; 8 ft. 10 in. 
Standing Broad Jump : 

1st, Clark '92 ; 9 ft. 6 in. 

2nd, Hull '91 ; 8 ft. 11 in. 
Potato Race: 

1st, Hull '91. 

2ud, Clark '92. 
Horizontal Bar : 

1st, Tinoco '93. 

2nd, Perry '93. 
Quarter Mile Run : 

1st, Hull '91 ; 1 min. 11 sec. 

2nd, Fletcher '92 ; 1 min. 13 sec. 
Running and Flying Rings : 

1st, Davis '93. 

2nd, Bartlett '93. 
Quarter Mile Walk : 

1st, Paige '91 ; 1 min. 51 sec. 

2nd, Crane '92 ; 1 min. 53 sec. 
Points Won by Classes: 

Seniors, 19; Juniors, 18; Sophomores, 

10 , Freshmen, 3. 

This applies now : 
Of all sad -words ever spoken or writ, 
The saddest of these is "please remit." 

Next term begins Tuesday, April 7th. 

Private Plumb has been transferred to 
Co. A. 

Those corn cribs are rather small. Pop 
corn is cheap. 

The next issue of this paper will be pub- 
lished April 15lh. 

Boardman, '94, is just recovering from 
an attack of tonsilitis. 

Hawkes, '93, and Henderson, '93, will 
be missed in the choir. 

There is some talk of reducing the Bat- 
talion to three companies. 

Mar. 16. '94 had its class pictures taken. 
Kenfield took the contract. 

The ice has rapidly disappeared from the 
campus in the last few days. 

Melendy, '93, will carry the mail next 
term. Sawyer, '91, is his substitute. 

March 10th. J. D. W. French lectured 
on Ayrshire cattle before the Seniors. 



Bicycles are once more seen on the side- 
walks. This certainly looks like spring. 

March 19. W. Fletcher, 92, crushed the 
fingers of his right hand quite severely in a 
door. 

Carpenter, Parke and Parker are recov- 
ing from the colds that are so prevalent 
just nwv. 

Curtis, '94, now rooms at the Plant- 
house, and is running the Plant-house fires 
in place of Thomson, '92. 

The speeches of Pres't Goodell have 
been an important feature at several recent 
Williston alumni meetings. 

March 13th. '91 inspects the meteoro- 
logical observatory. There is certainly a 
fine lot of instruments there. 

H. E. Crane, '92, was obliged to return 
to his home last Thursday, having had an- 
other attack of ulcerated sore throat. 

Prof. Warner moved out of his house 
last Wednesday. Members of the D. G. 
K. fraternity are now moving into it. 

Mar. 13. R. B. Moore gave a lecture at 
the Experiment Station to some of the stu- 
dents. His subject was " Milk Analysis." 

Sedgwick, '93, has been at home the 
past week. He will be here next term, 
having refused the position offered by the 
gypsy moth commission. 

Rev. J. P. Harvey of Ware exchanged 
with Dr. Walker last Sunday. His text 
was Mark 11 : 9, from which he preached 
a good, practical sermon. 

In Germany they have schools where 
girls and young women are trained for 
dairv and farm housework. Travelling 
teachers of husbandry are in demand. Ag-. 
ricultuial schools held evenings during the 
winter are well attended. 

Previous to the debate, a declamation 
was given by H. G. Stoekwcll, '94, a read- 
ing by F. S. Hoyt, '93, and an essay by C. 
P. Lounsbury, all of which were especially 
deserving of commendation. 

The new Board of editors for Aggik Life 
chosen by the Seniors of the present Board 
are as follows : '92 — H. E. Crane, R. H. 
Smith, G. E. T.aylor, G. B. Willard; 
'93- G. F. Curley, B.Sedgwick; '94— 
C. F. Walker. 

March 24, '93 elected its officers for thj 
coming term. They are as follows : presi- 
dent, F. .S. Hoyt; vice-president, C. A. 
Goodrich ; secretary and treasurer, F. A. 
Smith ; class captain, E. H. Lehnert ; base- 
ball captain, G. F. Curley. 



The following men are at work in Med- 
ford, trying to exterminate the Gipsy 
Moth: '92, J. B. Knight, F. G. Stock- 
bridge, H. M. Thomson ; '93, J. Baker, A. 
E. Hawkes, F. H. Henderson ; '94, F. L. 
Green, I. C. Green, C. P. Lounsbury. 

The N. H. Agricultural College will 
probably be removed from Hanover to 
Durham, shortly. Agricultural education 
should stand on its own merits and be 
purely agricltural, and not be made an in- 
ferior branch of some other institution. 

March 16. A large number of the stu- 
dents listened to the words of President 
Gates of Amherst College as he delivered 
his lecture at the Town Hall. He showed 
himself to be very easy and interesting in 
speech as well as pleasing and graceful in 
manner. 

After three sittings the Court Martial 
found Corporal Plumb guilty, through lack 
of interest, of causing disorder in Com- 
pany D at the Competitive Drill held Feb. 
28th in College Hall. At Dress Parade 
last Friday his. sentence was published. 
He is reduced to the ranks and will remain 
in that grade while a student in this insti- 
tution. 

Marriage: March 17th. Sis of his fra- 
ternity brethren and former classmates at- 
tended the wedding of Allan M. Belden 
and Miss Rose Higgins at Northampton. 
H. T. Shores officiated as best man. The 
ceremony passed off smoothly and all re- 
ported a pleasant time. The couple will 
live in Springfield, where Mr. Belden has 
gone into the milk business. 

Marcli 10th. Tlie Natural History So- 
ciety had a very interesting meeting. W. 
W. Gay, '91, read an essay on the life of 
Louis Agassiz. The topic under consid- 
eration was " Preparation for Spring 
Work." K. P. Felt, '91, gave a few hints 
to the entomologists. I. C. Green, '94, 
spoke a few woids about collectii'g birds. 
This was followed by a general discussion. 

jSlarch 13. The W. I. L. S. held its last 
meeting for the term. The question was: 
Resolved, that the coloring of oleomargerine 
in .imitation of butter should be prohibited 
by law. The debate was opened in the 
afiirniative by Mr. Riiggles '91, and in the 
negative by H. M. Howard '91, closed in 
the affirmative by G. V. Curley, '93 ; in the 
negative by E. J. Walker, '93. 'J'his ques- 
tion being particularly interesting to so 
many, was discussed in a lively manner. 
Weight of argument was decided in the 
affirmative, the merits of the question in 
the negative. 



94 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Owing to the sickness of several men, 
base-ball practice for the last week has 
been somewhat less than might he desired. 
To have good results next term it will be 
necessary for the team to work hard, and 
work as a team entirely obeying the cap- 
tain. We should at least expect as many 
victories as we had last year, and our am- 
bition ought not stop here. We certainly 
have as good material as we had last 
spring. 

March 21st the M. A. C. Boarding Club 
held its regular meeting for the election of 
the officers for next term. The following 
men were elected to membership : E. H. 
Alderman, A. J. Morse, R. E. Smith, C. 
H. Spaulding, li. D. White, all '94 men. 
The following are the officers for next term. 
W. H. Ranney '93, 1st Director and Busi- 
ness Manager; H. M. Howard '91, 2d 
Director and Vice President ; M. Ruggles 
'91, 3d Director, Secretary and Treasurer; 
B. Sedgwick '93, 4th Director, F.I.Parker 
'94, 5lh Director. Price of board for the 
term $2.45 per week. 

The manager of the ball nine wishes 
every student to return after the vacation 
with a full pocket-book. The subscription 
paper will be circulated at the beginning of 
next term and every one should subscribe 
as liberally as possible. For the last two 
or three years the ball team has not been 
properly supported, looking at it from a 
financial standpoint. It has been difficult 
to raise the small sum of $200, and $75 of 
that is subscribed by the faculty and grad- 
uates. This makes an average of only one 
dollar for each student. The average at 
Dartmouth, as published in their college 
paper, is about $4.20. We do not expect 
the students here to subscribe as liberally 
as at Dartmouth, but we should be able at 
least to raise $300. 

In order to play the usual number of 
games and meet expenses, we must have 
more money and it is to be hoped that the 
students will not shun the subscription pa- 
per this spring, as has been the case for the 
last few years. 

G. B. W. 



COLLEGE NOTES. 

Commencement at Amherst College June 
25. The inauguration of Pres. Gates June 
24. 

Brown University has voted to form a 
base-ballleagne with Trinity and Wesleyan. 

The Amherst base-ball team has been 
invited to play at West Point during Com- 
mencement week. 



Three laboratories, chemical, physical 
and biological, will be built at Williams 
College by F. F. Thompson of N. Y., at a 
cost of about $100,000 each. 

Edward Couant bequeathed $100,000 to 
Harvard. 

New Haven papers demand the whole of 
the Morrill grant fund for the Agricnltural 
College. The farmer will have his rights. 

Grants and allowances from 1860 to 
1890 : 

Institute of Technology, $661,673.36 

Mass. Agricultural College, 667,012.56 
Mass. Agr'l Col. Scholarships, 80,000.00 
Agr'l Exp. Station, 99,250 

Museum of Zoology, 355,707.67 

Williams, 100,000 

Tufts, 50,000 

Wesleyan, 47,298.04 

Mt. Holyoke College and Sem., 40,000 
Amherst, 27,000 



ALUMNI. 

G. B. Simonds, '90, is a selectman, over- 
seer of the poor and assessor of Ashby. 

F. W. Mossman, '90, gave an address 
before the Farmers and Mechanics Associ- 
ation of Westminister on " What crops to 
grow." 

Edward N. Dyer, '72, died at Holliston, 
March 17, of Bright' s disease. 

Truman P. Felton, '90, Supt. of farm at 
Sandwich. 



Y. M. C. A. PRAYER MEETINGS. 
Apr. 9 — Consecration. Ex. 32: 29 and 

Rom. 12 : 1, 2. B. Sedgwick. 
Apr. 12 — The Atonement. Rom. 5 : 1-13, 

18-21. F. S. Hoyt. 
Apr. 16— The Faithful Few. Judges 7 : 

1-25. C. A. Smith. 
Apr. 19— Cheerfulness. Prov. 17: 22. 

Stockwell. 



MANY YEARS HENCE. 

[From the Daily Bulbul.'] 
Our readers will be pleased to hear of 
the arrival in Cairo of our illustrious fellow 
countrymen Shaym Eased and Buhl 
Hedded and their party of explorers. 
These hardy adventurers set out more than 
two twelve-months ago to explore that vast 
country over the sea, once inhabited by a 
strange race called Americans. Our joj' 
at their safe return is none the less that it 
was feared that the sea had swallowed them 
up, that the plague that depopulated that 
land had seized upon them, or that some 
chance survivors of the denizens of the 
country had fallen upon them and slain 




Business i> Ijusiness. FEANK WOOD will get up 
Spreads for the Boys this winter. Send your orders 
right along to get there first. 



Go to BLODGETT & CLAEK 
for CLOi'HS or FURNISHING 
GOODS. 

They keep the best line and use 
the students well. 

Take your laundry to them Mon- 
day or Wednesday morning and 
you will get good work. 

BLODg-ETT ^ QAi&^- 



JOHN MULLEN, 



-DEALER IN- 



MEATS and PROVISIONS, 

VEGETABLES OF ALL KINDS IN SEASON, 

FISH AND OYSTERS, FOREIGN 

AND DOMESTIC FRUITS, 

AND CANNED 

GOODS. 

Palmer's Block, Main Street. 



E. R. BENNETT, 
Jeweler, 

Optician, 

Watchmaker. 

FINE GOODS! LOW PRICES! 

GOOD WORK WARRANTED. 

First Door from Post Office. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



95 



IF YOU "WANT TO GET OYSTERS IN ANY 
STYLE GO TO 

E. B. ARNOLD'S 

students are attended at short notice, 



Open all clays of the week until 13 o'clock. 
Suudaj's from 9 a. m. to 12-30 P. M., and from 
7 p. M. to 11 p. M. 

William's Block, Merchants' Row. 



The title page of this book was flrawn and engraved hy 

John S'^^i'^'Sj 



6 Davis Street, 



BOSTON, MASS. 



The various publications of Bates, Bowdoin, Colby, 
Tufts, Mass. Agricultural College, Wellesly and Yale 
have used his work. He will submit sketches and cari- 
catures for your approval. 



OFFICE OF 



EDWARD A. THOMAS, 

Fii}E/i^D Life If urance /ge^t, 

KEAL ESTATE FOR SALE AND TO LET. 



Office, CooTcs Hlocky Amherst, Wass, 



GEO. GRAVES, 



DEALER IN 



Painters' Supplies 

Personal attention given to Frescoing, Dec- 
orating and Paper Hanging, and all 
Interior and Exterior 
House Painting. 

Pleasant St, near L. J, Spear's Shop. 



AMHERST COLLEGE 



Cfl-OPERAIIf[ SIM LAUiBY 

and Carpet Renovaving Establisliment, 



Aggie Agent, H. M. HOWARD, '91. 



Work taken Monday delivered Wednesday. 
" " Wednesday delivered Saturday. 

= A.TISF-A-C!TIOISr C3-XrA.E,.A.:N"TBBI3. 

OFFICE AT BRINE'S. 

H. A. UTLEY, Manager. 



tlieni. Perlia[)9 our readers will be inter- 
ested in an incident of their travel as de- 
scribed in an extract from a letter from 
Fased to his friend Fuzzi Heysede. 

"Thou, O He3'sede, art much versed in 
ancient lore and have sate at the feet of 
our wise men, and thou must needs liave 
heard much concerning these Americans 
and knowest what credence to attach to 
tales of their prowess. 

It was once a mighty land, if we may 
judge by the ruins of its cities, but why 
O Fuzz', did these people, with so much 
land at their disposal, persist in piling 
their dwellings up till from their tops one 
could almost reach out and pluck the stars? 
No wonder that a pestilence made their 
memory to perish like a path in the sands 
of the desert. 

The city in whose deserted harbor we 
cast anchor was one of the oldest. Buhl 
Hedded, who had learned much of lore and 
had read books concerning these people 
said it was called Boaston or Boasting and 
sometimes Hhubb, the former presumably 
because the people were so fond of boast- 
ing of their tribal prowess, but the name 
Hhubb is inexplicable. 

Many a time did we find, now in a cit}', 
now in a ruined village, a field at either 
end of which was a framework of wood 
much resembling a gibbet. Sometimes 
additional was a space, in shape like a dia- 
mond of the Desert, with on the corners 
and sides and in the center, places much 
worn, as if men had stood there continu- 
ously. These fields much mystified us. 
Sometimes they stood alone, sometimes in 
the neighborhood of ruins of once costly 
buildings of stones and tiles. Hedded, by 
his superior knowledge, said that these 
buildings were what remained of those 
places where the youth of the nation were 
sent to sit at the feet of wise men, to pore 
over volumes of written lore and become 
scholars. 

In a ruinous structure in one of these 
old places of learning did we find that 
which threw much light on the question 
which we had asked ourselves, as to what 
these fields with their gibbets and peculiar 
markings were. It was in an apaitment 
apparently once occupied by some scholar 
of taste and wealth, that we found on the 
crumbling walls tablets, many of wliich we 
had found in other places, bearing repre- 
sentations of persons and landscapes, but 
here were two which attracted our atten- 
tion especially. They hung on opposite 
sides of the apartment. In the one was 
represented a field at either end of which 



was one of those gibbet- like structures, 
while in the midst of the field was por- 
trayed a group of struggling men. Their 
faces seemed to indicate that they were 
animated by some fierce emotion, while 
that of a man on the ground, held down 
by the rest, was the embodiment of despair 
and chagrin. It then burst upon me that 
this man had perpetrated some horrid 
crime, had fled, been pursued, overtaken, 
and was about to expiate his fault on one 
of these gibbets. But how wicked, O my 
Heysede, must have been these people, 
when in the midst of places of wisdom and 
learning it was necessary to have, not one, 
but two such awful structures. 

On the other tablet was represented one 
of these diamond shaped markmgs which 
we had seen on some of the fields. On 
the worn spaces and outside the figure 
stood men in various attitudes. In the 
center stood a man with arm upraised as if 
to hurl a missile at one of his fellows who 
was standing at one of the corners holding 
athwart his body a club. Behind the latter 
worthy stood, or rather stooped, one wear- 
ing a peculiar helmet which covered only 
the face. His hands were up'ifted as if in 
supplication. I was at a loss to interpret 
this, but Buhl Hedded, ever fertile of 
imagination, said that it could be onlj- a 
sacrificial scene, that the wretch with face 
covered by the helmet was probably the 
victim, to be beaten to death with the club 
when the high priest in the center should 
give the signal by throwing the missile. 

The setting sun, Fuzzi, warns me to 
draw my epistle to a close. Perchance at 
some no distant day I will relate to thee 
further tales of what we encountered across 
the sea, but ponder well on what I have 
told thee. The scenes portrayed on those 
two tablets left a deep impression on me. 

Believe me thine till Nile shall cease to 
flow. Fased. A. G. E. 



TRIALS OF AN EDITOR. 
When a fellow gets elevated to the posi- 
tion of an editor of his college paper, he is 
apt to feel pretty big. He sees a brilliant 
future now opening up before him. Very 
i.ikely he thiriks that in the past he has not 
been recoguized, as he ought to have been, 
as the most brilliant fellow in his chiss^ but 
finally his chance had come to show the 
fellows that he is somebody. Let them just 
wait until they see some of his writings in 
print, and then he will get the credit which 
he deserves and ot which he has been so 
long deprived. Why, he would send in 
such material as would boom the paper up 



96 



AGGIE LIFE. 



so that the subscription list would be more 
than doubled before two numbers were 
issued. He would reserve the next Tues- 
day evening, the night before the paper 
went to press, for writing up a few thoughts. 
He would write a four column article on 
some leading topic of interest ; he would 
just scratch off tliree or four editorials on 
matters calling for reformation, so that the 
old college would shake to the very founda- 
tion ; and, if he felt like it, he might add a 
contribution to the poetic department in the 
shape of a poem rivalling those of Tenny- 
son or Longfellow. O, he would fix them ! 
He would show the fellows that he was 
nobody's fool. 

Tuesday comes, and he hurries his 
studying along so that he can have the 
evening to devote to his work as an editor. 
Evening comes, and at about seven o'clock 
he is ready for work. He would write off 
the four column article first, then the edi- 
torials and later the poem. The first thing 
to do is to think of a topic. What shall 
he write about? Shall he discuss Eecipro- 
city? A good topic, but hardly suited for 
a college paper. No, he would not take 
that. He scratches his head. He tries to 
think. The evening passes on. Shall he 
take the College Farm? but that is already 
written to death. Perhaps he might write 
on Co-ed. — one, two, three — eleven o'clock 
and nothing done yet. Well, he would put 
this off for a little and tackle the editorials 
for they must be written up in good shape, 
anyway. Here again, what shall he write 
about? He might rebuke the authorities 
for the undesirable weather of the past 
week, but that would probably do little 
good. Or he might suggest improvements 
upon the manner of ringing the college 
bell, but that is rung to perfection now. 

At last, about one o'clock, tired, crushed 
in spirit, dreams of fame all gone, he 
climbs up the back stairs to bed, having 
ready for the paper a composition written 
Freshman year, entitled "Value of a Scien- 
tific Education to the Farmer" ; a short 
editorial, soliciting contributions of mate- 
rial for the paper ; and a poem, " Dreams 
of Love," taken from a magazine published 
five or six years before. Among his other 
prayers, Ihat night, he puts up one for all 
editors, past, present and future. 

If you are seeking a place on the Board 
of editors, we would not discourage you. 
Nay, we would encourage you, for if you 
were meant for an editor you will find it 
out, and if you were not meant for one you 
will also find it out, which will be worth 
something to you. J. 



PROOF READING. 

Even the hardest work has some redeem- 
ing feature and proof reading is no excep- 
tion to this rule ; that it is hard work, no 
one of experience will deuj'. 

In nature we find that the most showy 
flowers have little odor while the small in- 
conspicuous blossoms often have the sweet- 
est smell, and, what is more, this law 
applies not only to flowers but also to man 
and his occupations. 

The previously stated law applies to a 
certain extent to the proof reader, who is the 
the man that is required to apply himself 
closely to his work, and, as if in compen- 
sation for this rigid application, he is the 
man who reads many jokes, uuvvittuigly 
made by the compositor ; sometimes these 
jokes are good enough to give to the pub- 
lic, but many of them can only be appre- 
ciated when read first hand, and, therefore, 
it is only occasi<;nally that we read alist of 
humorous typographical errors ; the most 
of them belong to the proof reader, and no 
man can vrrest this pleasure from him. 

Then if more recreation is desired, the 
proof-reader has simply to pause a moment 
and laugh at his fellow laborer as he strug- 
gles wildly with misplaced letters and uses 
forcible, if not elegant, language about 
compositors in general, and the one in par- 
ticular, who "set up" the article he is now 
reading. Of course, if he has no compan- 
ion the latter pleasure is impossible. The 
type seems to have a special adaptation for 
the wrong place, and ever since the inven- 
tion of printing, typographical errors have 
enjoyed n well earned notoriety. If print- 
ing had been known at the beginning of 
time, the pig would have been long out- 
stripped as the type of obstinacy by type 
itself, and even with the longer record on 
his side, the pig h fast being overhauled 
by type. 

At the present time men have learned 
through sad experience not to trust type. 
Editors have adopted proof reading as a 
means of self-protection from indignant 
writers ; they have found that arguments 
were of little value in the presence of an 
excited author, whose feelings had been 
aroused to their highest pitch, by some 
shocking typographical error. 

Though the work is hard they try to look 
on the bright side of life and enjoy it while 
Ihey can. If you suffer from a typographi- 
cal error, blame, not the editor or compos- 
itor, but that soulless type. 

E. P. F. 



E, B, DI(5KII2gOI2, L.D.g- 



^■DEI]TftL i{OOII]S,-^- 



KEX^LOGG'S BLOCK, 



AMHERST, aiASS. 



Office Hours, 9 to 12 a. m., 1-30 to 5 p. m. 



4£«rEther and Nitrous Oxide Gas 'administered wlien 
desired. 



A.T TEiB 



jlMHERST CASH SHOE STORE, 

You can get tlie most for your money. 
BOOTS AND SHOES, RUBBERS, OVER- 
SHOES, SLIPPERS, TRUNKS, 
AND BAGS. 



REPAIRIN^NEATLY DONE. 
HAWES & STINSON, 

CASH ROW, AMHERST, MASS. 



AMHERST HOUSE 

LIYEBY, FEED, /ND SALE STABLE. 



T. L PAIGE, Prop'r 



HACKS TO AND PROM ALL TRAINS, OM- 
NIBUSES, HACKS, DOUBLE AND 
SINGLE TEAMS FURNISHED 
AT SHORT NOTICE. 
CAREFUL DRIVERS. PAIR PRICES. 

AMHBJiST, MASS. 



Sheet IVIiisic. 



Music Books, 



String's 

FOR THE VIOLIN, BANJO, GUITAR, 



DKALEItS IN 

•■STUDENT'S SUPPLIES 



■Ksg- 



Cushman's Music Store, 



.A.lS/i:iaE!E,ST. 



J, M, WAITE k SON, 



AND DEALERS IN 



Hats, Caps, Furs, Trunks, Bags, Furnistiiii Goods. 

Latest Styles iu Furnishings. Agent for 

Knox's and Youmau's Hats. Sole 

Agent for Pittsfield 

Lanudry. 

Hats Repaired, Furs Renovated. 

Give us a call before, purchasing. 
NO. 5 PH(ENIX ROW, AMSEJRST, MASS. 



%m\jitxBt Mouse, 



o 

AMHERST, MASS. 



The undersigned is t)leased to announce 
to his former patrons and others desiring 
Game Spreads or Dinners, that he is always 
prepared to accomodate (at short notice) 
large or small parties. 

Ample dining room capacity for 200 peo- 
ple. 

LORENZO CHASE, Prop'R. 

^ — . — . — k 

,.(^ DENTISTS. ^^., 

C. S. GATES, D. D. S. 

T. G. HUN^TINGTON, D. D. S. 

CVTZER'S BTjOCK, AMlIEItST, M.iSS. 



OFFICE HOURS : 
9 A.- ]V[. TO 5 -p. :ivn. 

Ether and Nitrfms O.xide administered when 
desired. 



FANCY GROCERIES, CROCKERY, CIGARS, 

CIGARETTES, TOBACCO, FRUITS 

AND CONFECTIONERY, 

MrQP gOODg MIT) KB^02EI]E OIL, 

SDonrs South of p. O., - AMHERST, MASS. 



EDWIN NELSON. 

Books and Stationery, 

Next door to Post Office, 
AMHERST, MASS. 



WOOD'S HOUSE 

HMJ^ D^ESSII^g KOOHiS, 

Razors Honed and Shears Sharpened at 
short notice. 

FERID. r.A.ISrEXJ3P, 

AMHERST, MASS. 



C. R. KENFIELD, 



Wood's Jlloclc, 



Amherstf Mass. 



SPECIAL. 



A Stem Wind aud Set ^Yaltham, Hampden, Elgin or II 
linoi.s movement in a Gold Filled Case loi' $1'}.UU. 



Uniln-ellas covered while yon wait, also dealer 
in Guns. Rifles, Ammunition and Sporting Goods 
of all kinds. Amateur riiotographic Outfits and 
Supplies. Views and' Pictures taken when de- 
sired. Views of Aniher.st and Vicinity for sale. 
Call and see before purchasing- elsewhere. 

«®-WATCH AND CLOCK REPAIRING A SPECIALTY..:.338f 



J. L. LOVELL, 

'^PH0T0gpPHE!?,6^ 

DRY PLATES, COMPOUND DEVELOPER 

AND SENSITIZED PAPER, READY 

FOR USE. 



PRINTING FOR AMATEURS 

Done in the best manner. 



AMHERST, MASS. 



I \_y I 



H 



H 



Haiit Tailor, 



.A.3VEia:EE,ST, 



nvc-A-SS- 



el. p. FJAWSON, 



DEALISK IN 



WST0HE^, 0LO2KS, JEWBLI^Y 

FINE POCKET CUT:^ERY, SILVER AND 

PLATED WARE, OPTICAL GOODS 

CANES, SPORTING AND 

FANCY GOODS, 

Gold Pens, Fine Stationery 



REPARING NEATLY and PROMPTLY DONE. 



AMHERST, MASS. 



DwiGHfp CQoor^B, 



BILLIARD AND POOL 



F.A.PLI_.OPL, 



3 Pha'nix Jtow (X^x*-sfftirs), 
AMHERST, MASS, 



Massachusetts Agricultural College, 



;v->r ■ ■■;;'**':-;;-: 



'WiWy.' 



i, - "' , ,V^' v-'^.-W^fl 




JVtrxla^jf^^t, ^^j;sLl»«s« 



y^t^r/. u . ^. /W<^t.^i>^^ 




VOL. I. 



AMHERST, MASS., APRIL 15, i8gi. 



NO. 13. 



4f 



PRIMTERS,* 



AMHERST, 



MASS. 



Mass, Agi|icultui]al College, 

Botanical Department, • 

AMHERST, MASS. 

We would iuforiu the friends of the college, 
and the public generally, that we are prepared 
to supply 

FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES ANI") 

SHRUBS, SMALL FRUITS AND 

PLANTS, 

true to name, also 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

all at the lowest price. 

For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and Small 

Fruits, address, 

Prof. S. T. Maynard, 

AMHERST. MASS 



THE AMHERST 



FURNITURE /nd CARPET STORE, 



C, H. SANDERSOt(& CO,, 



CASH DEALERS IN 



A complete line of goods suited to the students' 
wants. 



BEDSTEADS, MATTRESSES, PILLOWS, 



STUDY DESKS AND CHAIRS, 
LOUNGES 



WINDOW SHADES, DRAPERIES, 

CARPETS, RUGS, ETC., ETC. 



All {foods Strictlff Cash and at T^otwest J^rices, 



p]. D.. MARSH, 



10 I'HCENIX HOW, 



AMHERST, MASS, 



PII]E gLOTHII^S, 

Hats, Caps, Umbrellas, ■ and Gents' 
Furnishing Goods. 



CASH ROW, 



AMHERST. 



Sy\NDEpt{ & THOMPSOI^, 

CASH DEALEHS IN 

Dry and Fancy Goods, 



WHERE DO YOU BUY 



Meerschaum Pipes? 
French Briar Pipes? 
Choice Tobacco? 
Sponges? 
Soap? 

Hair Bru,shes from 25 cts. up? 
Comlis from 5 cts. up? 
Choice New Yovii Confectionery? 
Shaving Mugs? 
Shaving Soap? 
Lather Brushes? 

Cigarettes, fresli every two weeks? 
Tlie Best Soda in America? 
The Best Bay Rum? 
Imported Perfumes? 
Prescriptions prepared by licensed pharmacists? 
Imported Domestic Tooth Brushes? 

If you have not obtained these necessaries at 
DEUEL'S DRUG STORE, you have begun 
wrong. Deuel's is tlie leading , Drug Store in 
Western Mass., and Iveeps the largest assort- 
ment of goods at bottom prices. 



HOSIERY, RIBBONS, 'AND SMALL 
WARES OF ALL KINDS. 



AMHERST, MASS. 



BOOTSi^SHOES 

FOR EVERYBODY. 



A FINE UNE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, 
BALS. AND CONGRESS, 

A FULL LINE OF 

E.XJBBEB- C3-OOX5S, 

l<H)(rr-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH I'RICES. 

Repairing Done Promptly. 
T. W. SLOAN, 

3 FBfENlX now. 



S, J, SULLIVAN, 



DEALER IN 



Second-Hand Clothes 

AND 

FUENITURE. 

{^Orders promptly :ittended to.^^ 
1'. O. Box, ,319 AMHERST, MASS. 



DEUEL'S DRUG STOR 

Amtierst House Block, Amlierst, lass. 



HENRY ADAMS, 



PHARMACIST, 



NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Pure Drags and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORT- 
ED AND DOMESTIC CIGARS, 
, CIGARETTES, ETC., 
MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR I-IPES, 
fishing" TACKLE AND SPORTING GOODS, 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, and Sporting 
and Springfield Rifles. 

Sunday and night calls responded to at resi- 
dence, first doorVest of Wood's Hotel. 



(brugs, Medicines, 

TOILET ARTICLES, 

CONFECTIONERY, CIGARS, CIGARETTES 

AND SMOKERS' GOODS. 



jfnrsicTAifsi' rjtESCJtiyrioNs cake- 

PUI.Z.Y COMFOXiNDlSD, 



(i I'llCENLX ROW. 

Onlcr your COA£ here. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



VOL. I. 



AMHERST, MASS., APRIL 15, 1891. 



No. 13 



LEARNING TO WRITE. 

The art of learning how to write a liter- 
ary production that will reflect some credit, 
at least, upon the writer, is an accomplish- 
ment which every student should do all in 
his power to procure. To be able to ex- 
press one's thoughts in language which will 
give them the sense and beauty that is 
produced in the writer's own mind, is an 
art which will always repay the student 
ten fold for the time he may give for its 
acquirement even though it be but partially 
obtained. 

The young student, often wretchedly 
deficient in any such branch, has his failing 
forcibly brought to his mind by the rhetor- 
ical requirements of his college course. 
His success in his new study depends on 
several important points, all equally essen- 
tial for the production of a literary work 
however slight may be its pretentions. 

Upon the style that characterizes an 
author's writing does the literary ability of 
the writer largely depend. Too much 
stress cannot be laid upon the importance 
of acquiring a good style. This art of a 
pleasing manner of expression is, however, 
by no means easily obtained. Few have 
it as a natural gift. To the great majority 
it must be drawn out of the person himself 
and this can only be done by the most 
applied study and practice. It is that ele- 
ment of writing which cannot be imitated, 
that mode of expression which is alike in 
no two persons, that a young writer should 
draw into his composition in such a man- 
ner as to give it a distinguishing and char- 
acteristic effect. A great deal depends 
upon the manner and carefulness with 
which this should be done so that the 
writer may obtain a pleasing style of 
composition. 

The systematizing of the thoughts in 
such a manner as to give clear expression 
proves a stumbling block over which all 
toa many would-be- writers fall. Possessed 
as one is of a multitude of thoughts and 
facts, each one perhaps well developed in 
the mind and ably constructed, the ques- 
tion comes as to how these products of the 
mind are to be arranged as to make a 
readable article. This too in its details 
must be learned by the writer. One of 
the best ways to get ideas of systematizing 
is by the reading of other books. Digest 



the work of some good standard author, 
word by word, sentence by sentence, until 
the manner of construction has become 
perfectly familiar, and the mind has a 
clear perception of the way in which the 
fragments of original thought are moulded 
into the complete expression. 

Preference of words is another founda- 
tion upon which the writer must build liis 
literary work. This is an accomplishment 
in itself and can only be obtained by strict 
application to study. It is said of Choate 
that he always knew the right word to use 
in the right place. The word which would 
give the sentence the exact sense wanted 
always seemed to be in his power to use. 
He had a peculiar natural power of dis- 
cerning between synonyms in such a maj- 
ner as to use every word in its own partic- 
ular sense. In the common writer an 
approach even to such a power can only be 
gained by great patience and increasing 
practice. Some of our greatest English 
writers have spent hours in the rendering 
of a single word and have been well repaid 
if, after days of concentrated study, the 
sentence at last reached the perfection 
desired for it by the writer. 

Another element to be taken into con- 
sideration when a persjn is learning to 
write, and one especially essential to 
young aspirants, is that of giving plenty 
of time to the preparation of the produc- 
tion. It was no credit to that college 
Senior of whom it was said that he 
wrote his commencement thesis in one 
evening. Such haste and neglect is unex- 
cusable. Everyone, no matter how poor a 
writer, can at least give time to the prepar- 
ation of his composition. A hastily writ- 
ten production is worse than none at all. 
Give the written production time and 
thought in every particular. Especially to 
writers who have not the faculty of easily 
placing their thoughts on paper is this of 
great importance. 

A literary production of any pretentions 
at all will always show the labor spent on 
it even though it may have no especial 
merit. Let the writing taste of hard 
brain work. This every writer can give to 
his work, while every such carefully writ- 
ten essay is an improvement on the one 
before as well as strengthening the writer's 
mind for future work. 



Often a student says as he attempts to 
begin one of the numerous compositions 
required of him that he has no ability 
to write and there is no use in his trying 
to improve in that line of work. But out 
of apparent nothing something does come 
oftentimes, and, when this something has 
been developed and worked out, it may 
prove to be the person's fortune. 

R. H. S. 



HINTS TO SENIORS. 

Every Senior must have commenced his 
thesis by this time, Ijut a few suggestions 
as to its treatment may not come amiss. 
The subject, whether a happy selection or 
not, is your own selection and should be 
one' in which you are interested and on 
which you can write without fear and 
trembling. The rule for this year seems 
to be to choose an economic or political 
subject or choose none. It might be better 
for more to write on subjects more closelj' 
connected with the course of study. As it 
now is very few write on subjects that even 
suggest the course of study which they 
have just completed. Do not slight this 
first, last, and only chance you will have 
to graduate as an honor man. Write 
something that can be easily delivered and 
of so spirited a nature that your audience, 
on that warm June morning, will nut go to 
sleep, during the few minute.'* that you 
occupy the platform. Treat your subject 
as comprehensively as possible and jet do 
not try to settle any great problem of the 
day. Remember that you are but a young 
man and have not seen so much of this 
world as the wiseacres before whom you 
are to speak. Keep your own judgment 
in abeyance, and do not settle once for all 
any question in finance, religion or affairs 
in general. Try to treat the theme in a 
practical matter-of-fact style which can be 
easily comprehended. A plain demonstra- 
tion which the audience can understand 
will be far more appreciated than any daz- 
zling rhetoric. Do not write anything just 
to fill up, nor should you feel it necessary 
to exhaust the subject. 

Let industry and cheerfulness mark the 
remainder of your stay at Aggie. Let no 
unkind deed or rash act mar the pleasure 
of these few weeks. Make the most you 
possibly can of the remainder of this term 



98 



AGGIE LIFE. 



so that you may merit the plaudit, "Well 
done good aud faithful student, enter ye 
into your festivities." 

It would not be a bad idea to get those 
herbariums into order so that they may be 
properly exhibited. There ought to be 
more corapetitiou in that line of work so 
that one man cannot carry off the prize for 
best herbarium without outdoing an oppon- 
ent. 

It seems that there will be little time to 
review in agriculture in the lecture room 
this terra. It would be a good thing to 
looii over all those notes and get the nug- 
gets brightened up again so that they will 
shine at the prize examination in June. 



A THOUGHT. 



Alone hi the dusk at my window, 
When the evening sun was low, 

I watched how the wild wind wantonly 
Blew the dead leaves to and fro. 

All the tints of the earth had faded 
To one cold and cheerless gray. 

And this seemed a fit, dark ending 
For a dull, unhappy day. 

My thoughts took the same sad tinting. 

Of the scene I looked upon. 
And I called my school-days weary ones. 

And almost wished them gone. 

I thought of the tasks unfinished. 

The vain day left behind, 
And the deeds that should have been there 

I sought, but could not find. 

When, through the frame of my window, 

Across the darkening sky, 
I saw a flock of little clouds 

Sedately floating by. 

At first they were gray and sombre. 

Then over them were passed, 
Softly, and very slowly, — 

But to me it seemed all too fast, — 

Two with the color of rose leaves — 

Struck by the sun's last rays. 
And I said to myself — they are symbols 

Of these bright college days. 

They glide with their slow, sure fleetness 
From days, into months and years. 

And are gone from us forever : 
So why, with foolish tears, 

Do I mourn because a few gray tints, 

Are mingled with the rose. 
That a few of my days are stormy 

And the wind to roughly blows. 

When the gray clouds had floated onward 

And faded from my sight, 
On the dark back-ground of the heavens 

These others glowed, cheerily bright. 



Thus, when from my mind have faded 
All the days which gave me pain, 

The bright aud happy ones only 
As memories shall remain. 

Then let us think of the glad days 
They are long and they pace but slo w- 

Of the dark ones— though not swiftly. 
Yet steadily past they go. 

Swarthmore Phoenix. 



SPECIAL STUDY IN ELECTRICITY. 

Since there is a probability that the col- 
lege will receive a part if not the whole of 
the appropriation made by the United 
States Congress for the benefit of state col- 
leges ; there is a possibility that the col- 
lege will have eleotives, since all the 
officials are in favor of them and are only 
awaiting the decision of the legislature in 
the matter before taking any decisive steps 
in drawing up a list of electives. 

Among those electives, why not have 
one in electricity? There is an old 
saying that "money makes the world go 
round". This may be ever so true yet if 
we study closely into tlie occurrence and 
power of electricity we would be able to 
assign electricity the same function. Most 
persons on the first impulse are apt to 
underrate the value of this force. As 
physicists and meteorologists pry open 
the mysteries of nature they always find 
electricity in one form or another at the 
bottom of them. It occurs in greater or 
less quantities in all bodies of matter found 
in the earth, on the earth or above the 
earth. Its presence is manifested tons by 
the production of light, heat and sound. 

A large proportion of the new machinery 
and greater inventions that have been 
naade during the last ten to fifteen years 
are directy or indirectlj- operated by this 
comparatively unknown and mysterious 
force, electricity. 

In the preceeding I have reference to the 
inventions of the telephone, phonograph, 
electric lights and electromotion, besides 
the chemical phenomena produced \>y the 
passage of an electric spark. It has a pow- 
erful influence on the growth of vegetation 
and also in cases of certain diseases of 
mammals the effect of an electric current 
has been brought to bear upon the patient 
with very desirable and beneficial results. 

Electricity is also being used by the U. 
S. government in the war department but 
especially in connection with the navy, as 
motor power, lighting (including its search 
lights) and in the manipulation of its guns 
and torpedo boats. 



Therefore on account of the prominence 
of this force should not a graduate of this 
college understand at least the fundamen- 
tal principles of the source of so many 
striking phenomena? To be sure we get a 
smattering of this subject in our present 
course of physics ; but, this is not sufficient 
for the college graduate in the time of the 
present advancement of science. 

Therefore let us all use our influence, 
little or great as it may be, in the securing 
of the appropriation for our institution, in 
order that an elective study in electricity 
may be offered to the students of the 
college. 

R. 



EDUCATION. 

To educate means to lead forth, to bring 
up, to train, to improve, to add new or 
stronger energies to the powers originally 
possessed by the individual. A great 
many men mistake schooling for education. 

It has been truly said that simple school- 
ing can no more constitute education than 
simple eating can constitute health. In 
fact it is a very small proportion of real 
education that comes from formal schools 
of any kind. The common public schools 
all over this land simply start a man 
towards getting an education. Forexample 
John C. Calhoun was a much more thor- 
oughly schooled, but a far less educated 
man than Abraham Lincoln, and this is 
but one example out of a great many that 
might be given. 

Not very many years ago a young man 
in order to be a professional man of any 
sort or before he could be admitted to high 
society had to go through a college where 
he could get a thorough kuowlege of Latin 
and Greek aud all these higher branches 
of learning. But those are requirements 
of the past and Latin and Greek no longer 
constitute an education for a professional 
man. 

Scholarship alone never made a man, al- 
though it is indispensable in this age for 
evolving true manhood. 

Now let us notice the difference between 
schooling and education. The first pro- 
vides a drill of more or less value for the 
development or education of the lower fac- 
ulties of the soul, the mere intellectual. 
But education is the proper development 
of all the faculties of the whole being, phy- 
sical and mental, intellectual, moral, and 
spiritual. Books we must have but we 
should strive to make them our means, 
not our end ; our servants, not our mas- 
ters. We could not get rid of them if we 



AGGIE LIFE. 



99 



would and we would not if we could, but 
we should learu to use them as they were 
meant to be used when they were given to 
us. Education in its broadest significance 
cannot be confined to the narrow limits of 
its acquisition to youth. A raau never 
ceases attaining an education as long as he 
is connected with this life. Education 
gives men the power of observation and it 
is through observation tliat all great inven- 
tions have come. For instance, many 
men saw the steam coming from a tea- 
kettle but it was James Watt who saw the 
power of that steam and made it useful to 
mankind. 

In getting an education a man wants to 
get enough to be able to make it useful to 
others as well as to himself. No matter 
how good an education a man may have, if he 
cannot impart his knowledge to others, it is 
of comparatively little value. 

C. L. B. 



LETTER. 



Dear Editors : — Thinking perhaps a 
short description of our work on the Gypsy 
Moth Commission would interest your 
readers, I am prompted to write this short 
letter. 

At present we are at work on the eggs. 
These are found in masses enclosed in 
yellow hairs on the side of tree trunks 
from the top of the ground to near the top, 
on the under side of the larger branches ; 
on stones and fences, generally on the 
sheltered side and in cracks ; on buildings 
under the edge of the clap-boarding, under 
the piazza floors and doorsteps and in 
barns. Old tomato cans on dumps are 
often lined with eggs. If there is a dirty 
place about the buildings or a crack where 
it is difficult to get at them, there they are 
often found. 

Each town in which the moth is koown 
to exist is divided into sections of about 
one square mile. Each one of us has 
charge of the work on one section ; the 
remaining sections are given to the most 
competent men from the force. We are 
called inspectors. 

The first work is to inspect carefully, 
with what men we can use to advantage, 
which number varies with section and 
inspector, from two to ten, generally about 
five, every tree, fence, wall, and building, 
and mark every place where the eggs are 
found with white paint. As soon as one 
has inspected his section he goes over it 
the second time and removes all the eggs 
and burns them. 



In securing the eggs we have a great 
many interesting experiences. One or two 
have threatened to shoot the inspector if 
he came into his yard. Many inquire 
about the work and wish us success. 
Upon going into a yard — " Well, what do 
you want here?" "Gypsy moths?" " There 
isn't a Gypsy moth on the place," is often 
the first salutation. 

In districts where the eggs are abundant 
we are obliged to go under all piazzas, to 
take the base boards off from picket fences, 
or sometimes to take a fence down entirely. 

In these cases the owners often object, 
sometimes with quite strong language, but 
when they see we pay no attention to them 
they give us no trouble. We have author- 
it}' to enter any place and to do whatever 
we think necessary to destroy the eggs. 

H. M. T. 



'WAY BACK IN PELHAM. 

"'Twas 'long 'bout '72, 1 think, when 
father, having become struck with the idea 
of sendin' me, his pet boy, to college, de- 
cided to do suthin' about it right off. Wal, 
at this time I was as pretty a boy as you 
would care to look at, and I warn't scarcely 
tvrenty-five. I never dressed very nobby 
you know, but then my style of beauty, my 
harnsome flgger, and mj' fine manners 
kinder stuck me up above the other fellers 
in the village; meaniu', of course, in the 
eyes of the gals, for in fact the masculine 
gender seemed sorter jealous on me. 

"Father, he didn't seem to realize this 
state of things. He didn't take into 
account the many ties that held me home, 
the many hearts that would be broken if I 
should leave. These ideas struck me all 
the same, so I just brought my foot down 
and says. No ! If by goin' to school I shall 
make life not wuth livio' to the people of 
this, my native Pejham, then I shall not go. 

"I didn't say nothin' about this conclu- 
sion to father, as he was rather sot on my 
goin'. How in the world he could bear to 
part witii me was more than I could guess. 
To me the idea of leavin' my paternal an- 
cestor was always one sufficient to draw 
my bitterest tears. 

" However, one mornin' along in spring, 
just before Christmas or town-meetin', I 
forget \yhich, father says to me, just as the 
sun was gloriously settin' over the western 
hills, 'Azariah, my boy, you have always 
been a good child to me, and it now be- 
comes my duty to help you, and I am 
resolved to do it.' So takin' a worn pocket- 
book from some hidden nook in his vest, he 



unbuckled tlie long strap and drew out a 
two-dollar bill, sayin' at the same time, 
'There, take that money, go round to all 

the colleges in the stale, see which one you 
like best, and then go. I'll pay your way,' 
says he, as he gently tapped the side of his 
rusty but well-fed pocket-book. 

" Wal, 1 was rather took back by the 
old gent's generosity, butwitii put-on reluc- 
tance I accepted the two spot and conclud- 
ed to take the trip. 

" I started right off in my best suit of 
clothes. I couldn't help wonderin' all the 
wa}' down to the keers what father would 
do without me. You see plantin' was a 
comin' on and no plowin' had yet been 
done. But I just pushed aside these sad 
thoughts and struck out for a good time. 
The nighest college was in Amherst, so I 
strayed for there. When I approached the 
buildin's I saw a crowd on a field yellin' 
pretty loud at times, and I couldn't make 
out what the}- were doin'. I asked a young 
chap and he said it was a game ol round 
ball. I guess the feller meant three old 
cat, 'cause we always used to play that with 
a round ball when I went to school. 

" They had four sticks stuck up in the 
ground, makin' a square. Side of each 
stick was a man, with pants on arter the 
fashion of those worn by Gen. Washington 
in the revolutionary war. I guess they 
must have been celebratin' his birthday. 
There were three men in a row behind the 
man with the bat and there was several 
men farther out on the field all dressed in 
that old fashioned way. The batter made 
two vicious whacks at the ball and didn't 
hit it. This made him madder than thun- 
der, and he did considerable talkin', seekin' 
to make out that the pitcher was a-tryin' 
to fool him. Well, at last he got to the 
first stick, and I tell you, he was a dis- 
agreeable sort of a feller. He got into 
some argument with the man stationed 
there, and when the little chap acted as if 
he was goin' to do some fightin' that blamed 
coward started to run like fiu-y toward the 
man at the next stick, as if for protection. 
He didn't get very far though before the 
pitcher, thinkin' he would have a hand in 
the matter, just shot the ball through the 
air and picked the cranky cuss under the 
ear. I tell you, I was mighty glad on it. 
Some one then yelled 'OMi',and I guess the 
feller was just a little out. He turued 
around and slunk off lookin' a trifle dazed 
like, and I didn't see him for quite awhile. 
That was a hard played game, I swan ! 
They all got mad after a while and spotted 
each other like fury. I just made up my 
mind that my features were far too valua- 
ble to be spoiled in that manner. That 
was one point against my goin' to college. 
I stayed in tliaf town almost two days, 
when the thoughts of father and the plantin, 
almost drove me crazy, so I skipped for 
home. Father, he caught me in his arms, 
and says 'Azariah, don't leave me again.' 
You can bet I didn't, but just settled right 
down on the farm in dead earnest. 

G. F. C. 



100 



AGGIE LIFE. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Published Fortnightly by the Students of the 
Mass. Agricultural College. 

Terms $1,00 per year, in advance. Single copies, 10c. 



Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 

BOARD OF MIHIOMS : 

n. E. CRANE, '92, Editor-in-Chief, 
G. B. WILLARD, '92, Business Manager, 
G. B. TAYLOR, '92, E. H. SMITH, '92, 

G. E. CURLEY, '93, B. SEDGWICK, '93, 

C. F. WALKER, '94. 



Address all communications to the Business Manager. 



tV^^tU-^t^ T), W.tl'J.tV.QNi^t^ ^?.\H-^t9.S. 



After a short intermission the Life again 
makes its appearance, but under a new 
management. The former board has laid 
its work aside, and it now falls upon us U> 
carry it forward. When they entered upon 
their work they endeavored to fall back 
upon their predecessors for a policy, 
but unfortunately, they had none- We 
can look back with a feeling of joy and 
gratitude to the former editors, for they 
have indeed left us a policy, one that is re- 
liable, and can be depended upon, and by 
their forethought have placed the new 
board in a position where they may suc- 
cessfully carry the Life forward. The re- 
tiring board is to be congratulated for the 
interest aud perseverence that has been 
necessary to carry forward this work so 
successfully, and it has been successful, 
for it has kindled an interest in literature, 
and through its columns many have ex- 
pressed their thoughts and developed their 
literary ability. We realize that in the re- 
tirement of our senior editors we have sus- 
tained a severe loss, but by making extra 
exertions we hope to survive it. One thing 
we desire to impress upon the minds of the 
students ; it is your paper, aud on you 
rests considerable responsibility, for with- 
out the co-operation of every student we 
cannot hope to gain tlie best results. Every 
student should make it a point to write 
every terra, for plenty of material tends to 
increase the quality of the paper to a high- 
er degree of excellence. We shall make 
no elaborate changes this term, but con- 
tinue essentially as our former board. 
Time will probably bring improvements, 
but just now we can do no better than to 
follow the plans that have been laid out for 
us. We have no excuses or explanations 
to offer, and we present to you the first 
spring issue of Aggie Life, hoping you 
will justly criticise its merits and demerits. 



The contemplated field-day should not 
be forgotten. Do not stop with the prep- 
aration of last term. Those men wlio are 
not actively engaged in base-ball should 
devote their time to practice for the coming 
field-day. This is a somewhat new line of 
work, and because it is new, let each man 
take hold and make the first field-day a 
success. 



The last term's work of the Natural 
History Society was largely restricted to 
subjects of no special signiQcance and to 
preparation for coming work. This term 
will be the time for solid work. This so- 
ciety offers a splendid chance for individ- 
ual research and its members, having the 
hearty co-operation of so many members of 
the faculty, will, by their work, not only 
benefit themselves, but the scientific world 
at large. 



We understand that there is a feeling of 
discouragement among members of the 
college band, with the loss of one and pos- 
sibly two of their members. This will cer- 
tainly cripple them somewhat, but no one 
who heard them play will say that their 
work of last term was not a success, and it 
will be so this term, even with loss of mem- 
bers, if those remaining keep up their 
wonted enthusiasm. Bear in mind that 
next commencement will be the time for 
public display of your merits, and to do 
yourselves justice at that time, keep up 
your courage and practice faithfully. 



It is said that nature i.s full of poetry 
and indeed it is, and to those not initiated 
into student life, it would seem that poetic 
inspiration would fill the breast of every 
member of the M. A. C. One would think 
that poetry might flow from their pens as 
freely as money from their pockets. But 
the contributions received by us seem to 
be sadly deficient in this useful article of 
furniture. Wliether from diffidence on the 
part of the youthful poets, or from other 
causes we are not prepared to say. But 
we would say that all contributions in this 
line will be very thankfully received. 



Where is the half dollar I paid the 
Athletic Association for gymnasium appa- 
ratus? This is a question asked by some 
persons every now and then, and a very 
feasible one too. Not doubting in the 
least but that the money is in safe hands, 
we ask why some use is not made of it? It 
was the wish of the college that some new 
apparatus should be put in and so the tax 
was laid. The boys have been waiting- 



some weeks for the appearance of little 
improvements, now and then, but have 
failed to discover any, even yet. This is 
certainly not the way to insure the future 
generosity of the students. The excuse is 
sometimes given that half of them didn't 
pay. This may be an exaggerated truth. 
The matter is, to a certain extent, left to a 
man's honor. If he hasn't the spirit himself 
to go in and do something to elevate col- 
lege athletics, the least he can do is to fur- 
nish the little money that is required of him 
through the year to support these interests. 
But allowing that half didn't pay in this 
instance, is the other half never to see any 
results in the gymnasium? If not, then 
justice is not done them. Then right here 
we would say, it is about time for the 
schedule of field-day sports to be published. 
If the fellows knew just what there was to 
be, they could go to work with more deter- 
mination, and consequently there wbuld be 
better showings when the day arrived. 



The difficulty of obtaining water during 
the recent fire suggests the inquiry, should 
there not be a hydrant placed near the 
boarding-house? In order to obtain water 
to wet the roof of the boarding-house it 
was necessary to lay the hose from the hy- 
drant just west of north college and carry 
it across the ravine. The friction in so 
long a line of hose was so great that there 
was not force enough at the nozzle to carry 
water to the roof. It would seem from 
this that another hydrant, connected with 
a main, of sufficient size, should be placed 
in such a position that water may be readily 
obtained in case of another fire. It also 
seems that some waj' should be provided 
for getting at the bell to give an alarm, in 
case of fire. At present the door opening 
into the old gymnasium is kept locked for 
the safety of the collection of Japanese 
tools kept there, and only the bell-man and 
janitor have keys. In case a fire starts 
during their absence there is no way of 
getting at the bell to give an alarm and 
such was the case during the recent fire. 
Another important question is, why have 
we had no fire drill? True, the fire order 
has been conspicuously posted, but if we 
have no drill how can we be expected to 
work together? At a fire prompt action is 
necessary, and each companj- should know 
just what its duty is and should perform 
it. A few fire drills would enable each 
compauy to become familiar with its parts 
and insure prompt action in case of fire 
Can we not then have at least one fire 
drill ? 



AGGIE LIFE. 



lOI 



SCHEDULE. 



GENERAL EXERCISES. 



1-15 A.M., Chapel. | lO-.TO a.m., Church, Sunday 

8-30 A.M., Insp. rooms. Sat. | 4-15 P.M., Drill, M. Th. F. 



CLASS EXERCISES. 



SENIOR. 



JDNIOK. 



8-30. Const. History. English Literature, T. 

Chemistry, W. 
Landsc. Gardening, Th. 
Rhetoricals, F. 
9-30. Ag'culture, T. W.Th. Landsc. Gard., M. T. Th. 
Chemistry, or j -.r -pi Chemistry, W. 
Geology, j lu. r . Agriculture, F. 



10-30. Veterinary Science. 
11-30. Geology or Chem. 

P. M. 

1-45. Military Science, M. 

SOPHOMORE. 
A. M. 

8-30. Agi'iculture. 
9-30. French. 



Entomology. 

Physics or Entomology. 

Chemistry, M. T. 
Landsc. Gardening, F. 

FRESHMEN. 

Latin, M. T. \V. Th. 
Geometry, M. T. W. Th. 
English, .F 
Agriculture. 



10-30. Survey, T. W. Th. F. 

Rhetoricals, M. 
11-30. Survey, T. W. Th. F. Botany, 
p. M. 
1-45. Horticul., M. T. W. Rhetoricals, Th. 



GLEAMINGS. 

Play ball! Flay Ball! 

Major Ruggles returned last Friday. 

The new back stop needs a coat of paint. 

Mr. David Barry '90 spent Sunday at 
M. A. C. 

Base-ball and tennis are prohibited in 
the drill hall. 

Major Ruggles inspected rooms last 
Saturday morning. 

M. H. Williams, '92, has not yet 
returned to college. 

Hereafter, all unexcused absences from 
drill will be made up on Saturday. 

Keith, '94, who went home last term on 
account of sickness has returned. 

Has anj' one seen those agricultural cats 
that belonged to the doomed barn ? 

Mr. One has left the boarding club owing 
to the inclemency of the weather. 

The Juniors this term have laboracory 
work in both chemistry and zoology. 

Wm. H. Eanney has moved his stock of 
students' supplies to the boarding house. 

Go up up to the plant house some moon- 
light night and hear those cabbages grow. 

The last bulletin of the Hatch Experi- 
ment Station was edited by Prof. Fernald. 

Duffield, '94, has left college and obtained 
a position with the would be gypsy moth 
exterminators. 

Prof. Fernald will lecture at the Grange 
April 17. Subject : — " Intelligence in the 
Lower Animals." 

Prof. Maynard gave the Junior class an 
interesting lecture on Horticulture last 
Monday morning. 



The back net of the Q. T. V. tennis 
court suffered among other things in the 
recent snow storm. 

Tlie removal of the D. G. K's to their 
society house results in several unoccupied 
rooms in South college. 

H. C. West, '92, will be obliged to 
remain out of college for some time owiug 
to trouble with his eyes. 

The Washington Irving Literary Society 
has adjourned indefinitely owing to the 
pressure of other duties. 

Now is the time for the Freshman and 
Sophomore orators to be thinking of the 
Kendall Prize Speaking. 

We hail with pleasure the sight of our 
campus which for many weeks has been 
deeply covered witii snow. 

Last Wednesday tlie Juniors had two 
hours off recitation, owing to a bolt 
obtained on Prof. Maynard. 

The State Experiment Station will soon 
issue a bulletin on the composition and 
value of commercial fertilizers. 

At the first base-ball game let every 
man yell Eah! Bah! Rah--Rah-Rah! 
A-g-g-i-e ! Bah ! Bah ! Bah-Bah-Bah ! 

The room in North college lately vacated 
by the D. G. K. Fraternity has been 
repaired and made ready for occupancy. 

Chemistry has been dropped from the 
Freshman course for this term owing to the 
unusual number of hours recitation it would 
necessitate. 

We regret to record the illness of Pres. 
Goodell which has prevented him from 
assuming his duties. Prof. Ma^'nard is 
acting President. 

Last Friday afternoon the diamond was 
smoothed and rolled and a new back stop 
constructed to resist the onslaught of the 
mighty base-ball. 

The class of '91 held a meeting Monday 
and voted to have their class pictures 
taken at Greenfield Saturday. Hull was 
elected base-ball captain. 

The bridge in the botanic path has come 
to grief. Some person unacquainted with 
the condition of this structure will do the 
same if he attempts to cross it some dark 
night. 

A large show case has been placed in 
the botanic museum. Among the curiosi- 
ties it will contain is the renowned squash 
that attracted so much attention a few 
years ago. 

Last Thursday afternoon the first prac- 
tice game of base-ball was played on the 



campus, but the ground was so wet and 
the ball so slippery that little could be 
accomplished. 

Who raised sucli havoc in the drill hail 
last vacation ? We sincerely hope there is 
no one in college who would degrade him- 
self to so great a degree as to become 
engaged in such- disgraceful woi-k. 

The campus was in very good condition 
for ball playing during the first part of the 
vacation, and had it not been for the heavy 
fall of snow we should have heeu able to 
practice out of doors at the beginning of 
tlie term. 

The class of '94 has elected tlie following 
officers for the term: Pres., L. Manley ; 
Vice-Pres., T. S. Bacon; Sec, A. C. Cur- 
tis; Treas., R. E. Smith; Class Cap't, J. 
E. Gifford ; Historian, E. W. Morse ; Serg. 
at Arms, E. L. Boardman. 

The following are the most promising 
candidates for the base-base team : — Paige, 
Ruggles, Hull, Legate, Crane, Willard, 
Fletcher, Curley, Howard, F. A. Smith, 
Parker, Barton, Sanford, Dickinson. 

The D. G. K's are now settled in their 
new home, being the first society in college 
to inaugurate the use of society houses. 
We wish that instead of one, four houses 
might be seen upon the college grounds. 

The College Shakespearean Club elected 
officers for the term last Saturday night as 
follows : Pres't, E. P. Felt, '91 ; Vice-Pres., 
H. B. Emeison, '92; sec, C. F. Walker, 
'94 ; treas., H.F. Staples, '93 ;lst director, 
M. Ruggles, '91 ; 2d diiector,C. S. Graham, 
'92 ; 3d director, G. T. Curley, '93. 

The class of '92 held a meeting directly 
after the mass meeting Fridaj' morning, 
and elected the following officers: Pres., 
W. I. Boynton; Vice-Pres., E. T. Clark; 
Sec, H. B. Emerson; Treas., E. B. Hol- 
land; Class Cap't., W. Fletcher; Base- 
Ball Captain, W. Fletcher. 

The following base-ball games have been 
arranged for the coming season : 
April 25th, Monson A'c'd at Aggie, 
May 2d, Aggie at Tufts, 
May 9th, Aggie at Trinity, 
May 16th, Wilbraham at Aggie, 
May 23, Aggie at Wilbraham, 
June 6th, Tufts at Aggie. 

Other games are to be arranged. 

A paper was lately read before the State 
Board of Agriculture by Mr. Wm. H. 
Bowker, member from the Worcester north- 
west society, entitled " The Massachusetts 
Board of Agriculture and the Agricultural 
Societies." The article, which has been 



102 



AGGIE LIFE. 



published in pamphlet form, endeavors to 
point out the defects in the present system 
of management, and gives many valuable 
suggestions for its improvement. 

Through the kindness of the faculty a 
mass meeting was held in the old chapel 
the first hour Friday morning. The resig- 
nation of H. E. Crane as treasurer of the 
Base-Ball Association was accepted, and E. 
Rogers elected to fill the vacancy. E. H. 
Lehnert was elected Sophomore base-ball 
director, to take the place of J. Baker. 
The matter of raising a larger sum of 
money than in former years was discussed, 
and it was voted to follow the custom of 
other colleges by asking for pledges from 
the students in the meeting. The sum of 
five dollars was named and then a smaller 
sum until all had pledged themselves for 
some amount. Two hundred and thirty 
dollars were raised in this way among the 
students and it is hoped the amount will 
reach three hundred dollars by the subscrip- 
tions of the faculty and alumni. A. H. 
Cutter was elected Freshman director of 
the Athletic Associaiion to fill the place of 
I. C. Green. H. B. Emerson was elected 
secretary and treasurer of the Tenuis Asso- 
ciation, C. A. Goodrich sophomore director, 
F. S. Hoyt director of Reading Room Asso- 
ciation. It was voted that the four class 
base-ball captains arrange a schedule of 
class games to be played if possible next 
week. 



THE FIRE. 



Early in the evening of April 4, the last 
Saturday of vacation, the few occupants of 
the college dormitories were suddenly 
startled by the cry of "Fire!" Flames 
were discovered issuing from the building- 
known as the "Hatch barn," situated north 
west of the boarding house, and although 
but few persons were on the grounds, the 
alarm was spread as rapidly as possible. 

When discovered, the fire had gained 
such headway as to render it impossible to 
save either the building or its contents, and 
so every effort was made to protect Prof. 
Walker's house and the boarding house, 
which were in danger. Fire ladders were 
brought from the South College basement, 
and the roof of the boarding house was 
wet as rapidly as possible by the use of 
buckets. 

After some delay the college hose was 
laid from the hydrant west of North Col- 
lege, through the ravine and back of Prof. 
Walker's house, fifteen lengths being re- 
quired to reach the desired spot ; but when 



at last a stream of water was turned on the 
roof it was evident the danger was over. 

Meanwhile, word had been sent down 
town, and the fire organizations from there 
and from East Street soon arrived on the 
scene, but happily their help was not 
needed. 

The building being of wood and contain- 
ing combustible material, burned very 
rapidly, and the sight of the fiames brought 
a great crowd of spectators from every part 
of the town. 

The barn was new, being built about 
two years ago by the Hatch Experiment 
Station, and has been used by the agricul- 
tural department. Its loss is to be regretted 
not only for its pecuniary value and tlie 
delay it will necessitate in the work of the 
station, but because the building and its 
surroundings was an object of interest to 
every visitor to the college. 

The origin of the fire is not known. The 
building was closed but a few hours before. 
Although there had been a fire in the office 
during the day there was none when the 
barn was closed, while the evidence of 
those who were first on the scene tends to 
show that it must have originated in the 
fertilizer room or on the floor. There was 
in the building at the time a quantity of 
fertilizer, ensilage, and other crops, also 
farm and dairy tools. The loss is well 
covered by insurance. 

This is the first fire that has occurred on 
the college grounds since that memorable 
morning of October 22, 1887, when the 
third floor of North College west entry was 
burned out. That an equally long time 
may elapse before we are again visited by 
such a catastrophe, we can only hope. 



PRAYER MEETING TOPICS. 

April 16th.— The Faithful Few. Judges, 

7:1-25. C.A.Smith. 
April 19th.— Cheerfulness. Prov. 17:22. 

H. G. Stockwell. 
April 23rd. — Our Individual Responsibility 

to God. Luke 19:12-27. 

W. H. Ranney. 
April 26th.— Our Example. Matt. 5:16. 

A. H. Kirkland. 



ALUMNI NOTES. 

H. E. Woodbury, '89, until recently 
Assistant Horticulturist at the Hatch Ex- 
periment Station, Amherst, has accepted a 
position as principal of the Northboro 
High School. 

At a meeting of the Mass. Agricultural 
College Alumni Club of Massachusetts, 
held at Boston, March 3, it was voted that 




Business is business. FRANK WOOD will get up 
Spreads for the Boys this winter. Send your orderi 
right along to get there first. 



Go to BLODGETT & CLAEK 
for CLOTHS or FURNISHING 
GOODS. 

They keep the best line and use 
the students well. 

Take your laundry to them Mon- 
day or "Wednesday morning and 
you will get good work. 

BLODSETT § 0Lft]^K 



.JOHN MULLEN. 



-DEALER IN- 



MEATS and PROVISIONS, 

VEGETABLES OF ALL KINDS IN SEASON, 

EISH AND OYSTERS, FOREIGN 

AND DOMESTIC FRUITS, 

AND CANNED 

GOODS, 

Palmer's Block, Main Street. 



E. R. BENNETT, 
Jeweler, 

Optician, 

Watchmaker. 

FINE GOODS ! LOW PRICES ! 

GOOD WORK AVARRANTED. 

First Door from Post Office. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



103 



IF YOU WANT TO GET OYSTERS IN ANY 
STYLE GO TO 

E. B. ARNOLD'S 

0Y2TER gftPE, 



Students are atteiitoljt short notice. 

Open all da}'s of the week until 12 o'clock. 
Sundays from 9 a. m. to 12-30 p. m., and from 
7 p. M. to 11 p. M. 

William's Block, Merchants' Row. 



The title page of this book was drawn and engraved by 

John S"fcur;^is, 

6 Davis Street, BOSTON, IVIASS. 

The various publications of Bates, Bowdoiu, Colby, 
Tufts, Mass. Agricultural College, Wellesly and Yale 
have used liis work. He will submit sketches and cari- 
catures for your approval. 



OFFICE OF 



EDWARD A. THOMAS, 

h^}^ Life IpRANCE /ge^t, 

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE AND TO LET. 



Office f CooTcs JBlochf A-mJierst^ Mass. 



GEO. GRAVES, 

DEALER IN 

Painters' Supplies 

Personal attention given to Frescoing, Dec- 
orating and Paper Hanging, and all 
Interior and Exterior 
House Painting. 

Pleasant St,, near L J. Spear's Shop, 



AMHERST COLLEGE 

CO-OPERATIVE STEi LAUNDRY 

and Carpet Renovaving Establishment, 



ie Agent, H. M. HOWARD, '91. 



Work taken Monday delivered Wednesday. 
" " Wednesday delivered Saturday. 

S.A^TISF.A.CTI03Sr O-XJA.Il.A.ISr'rEIBia, 

OFFICE AT BRINE'S. 

H. A. UTLEY, Manager. 



a meeliiig of the cUib be held at Amherst 
Commencement week, and tiiat the details 
of arrangement be left to the lioard of 
diiectors. Tlie club now numbers one 
hundred and twenty-two members of which 
five are honorary. 

F. L. Taylor and J. S. West, both of 
'90, are vvitli the Gypsy Moth Commission 
near Boston. 

A. C. McCloud and D. Barry gave a 
very pleasant entertainment, March 28, at 
their hotel in Lynn, to their college friends 
living in the vicinity of Boston. 

J. S. Loring, '90 has received the ap- 
pointment of Assistant Horticulturist of 
the Hatch Experiment Station at Amherst. 

A. C. McCiond and D. Barry, who have 
been at Lynn in the employ of the Thom- 
son-Houston Electric Company, have 
moved to Boston, where they are employed 
by the same company. 

Williams College has formed a dramatic 
association. No less than two plays are 
to be presented during the year and a prize 
is olTered for the best piece of dramatic 
literature written by a student. 



NEW YORK MATHEMATICAL 

SOCIETY. 
New York City, April 3, 1891. 
Dear Sir : 

I have the pleasure to inform 
you that you have this day been elected a 
Member of the New York Mathematical 
Society. 

Very respectfully yours, 

Thomas L. Fiskb, 
Secretary. 
Professor C. D. Warner, 
Amherst, Mass. 



THE AMHERST GIRLS. 

The Amherst girl, 

Like a stylo pen, 

Subject is to fits and starts. 

Her style is good. 

But you know not when 

She'll work in trim, be free from darts 

And sudden spirts, like the flowing ink, 

Which from the pen should smoothly glide. 

And it sometimes does. 

But one has to think 

To shake that it may slide. 

Thus local maids 

The scepter wield 

In a manner that is quite deft. 

The youth is slow 

His heart to shield, 

And ere he knows it he is left. 



AN ORCHESTRA. 

There is a movement on the part of a 
few students to start an orchestra. Too 
mucii cannot be said in favor of forming 
such an organization, wlien there is cer- 
tainly talent enougli In college to carry the 
thing through successfully. At present we 
have two violins, a cornet, clarionet, pic- 
colo, slide trombone, and will soon have a 
bass viol. Now vvith these parts, we sliould 
be able to form an orchestra which with 
time and practice would be a credit to the 
institution. One point in its favor is that 
tlie men who handle these instrninents will 
undoubtedly remain in college two or three 
years more, so there will be ample time to 
work for good results. The work could be 
done, too, without taking any appreciable 
amount of interest from other departments. 
Any movement of this sort should receive 
the encouragement of each and every 
student. 



COLLEGE NOTES AND EXCHANGES. 

Yale is to have an $85,000 dormitory. 

Delaware College is to have a chair of 
Agriculture. 

Harvard's base-ball schedule for April 
contains thirteen games. 

The annual gymnasium exhibition at 
Trinity was held April 7th. 

The Harvard Overseers have voted 
against the faculty's proposal for a three 
years' course. 

The Amherst students are planning for 
a "mock town meeting" which will be held 
early in the term. 

Harvard's athlete, Shaw, was drowned 
last week while out with the college crew 
on the Charles River. 

The University of Chicago, of which 
Prof. Harper of Yale is to be president, 
will open Oct. 1st, 1892. 

The Dartmouth Freshman base-ball suits 
are of Yale gray with green trimmings, 
green sweaters and stockings. 

The third mouth SvKirthmore Phoenix 
contains interesting sketches of the lives 
of her two former presidents. 

Oberlin, with all her seventeen hundred 
students, has no secret societies. All the 
societies of the institution are purely 
literary. 



104 



AGGIE LIFE. 



The eightieth birthday of Ex-Presideut 
McCosh of Princeton was celebrated by 
the faculty and students of that institution, 
April 1st. 

President Jordan of the State University 
of Indiana has been appointed president of 
the Leland Stanford University, California, 
at a salary of $10,000. 

In many students' rooms can be seen 
posted on the walls such resolutions as 
these : "I will, 1st, rise at 7 ; 2d, break- 
fast at 7-30 ; Sd, go to chapel at 8 ; 4th, to 
recitations at 8-30."' — Willistonian. 

Oh ! if certain students here at Aggie 
would only post such an article in their 
rooms and live up to it. What a refresh- 
ing surprise it would be to the rest of us. 

The new president of Rutgers proposes 
to have some of the professors of the State 
College go through the state lecturing on 
agriculture and mechanics. He also in- 
tends that the studeuts be required to do 
practical work in agriculture. 

A CHEMICAL ROMANCE. 
Said Atom unto Moly Cnle, 
"Will you unite witli me?" 
And Moly Cnle did quick retort : 
"There's no affinity." 

— Purdue Exponent. 

The following from the Swarthmore 
Phoenix is very suggestive, and we think 
its sentiment will be echoed by our '94. 
"The Profs, sit up till morning light 
And sternly tough exams, they write, 
That would reach from here to Jericho, 
And are full of things that we don't Ivuow." 



BASE BALL. 



We are fortunate this year in having 
some very good material and if it is only 
properly developed we can have a nine 
here that can make a creditable showing 
against some of our larger colleges, for 
experience has verified that it is a detri- 
ment and even a disgrace for a college of 
our standing^ to play games with these high 
and preparatory scliools about us, for the 
team loses snap and plays with a lifeless- 
ness characteristic of no respectable nine. 

Let us look higher, no matter if we do 
not succeed in winning every game, for it 
will be au incentive to the players to work 
harder and secure greater honors. Now 
our nine must have the cooperation of all 
the studeuts. You have responded nobly 
to the call for money and you may still 
help in many ways. You may not have 
the ability to play on the first nine, but if 
you have au inclination to play ball there 
is usually an opportunity for you ou the sec- 
ond nine, this will help along greatly. 
Again by your presence on the field, and a 
hearty cheer for every good play, you may 
help again, and it is earnestly desired this 
year that every student witness the prac- 
tice games, but be just in your critisisms 
and remember that no ball player is per- 
fect. By this means and careful practice 
ou the part of our nine we may be assured 
of a successful season. 

H. E. C. 



The spring term opens with base ball as 
the principal sport, and it is certainly very 
gratifying to our enthusiasts to be able 
once more to practice out of doors. 

During the winter term our candidates 
for the nine have as a rule practiced quite 
faithfully everything taken into considei'a- 
tion, and no little credit is due the Cap- 
tain for the interest and'perbisteucy he has 
shown in carrying the work forward. In 
many cases they have been obliged to prac- 
tice under some very discouraging circum- 
stances, but under his able guidance we 
feel that more has been accomplished this 
year than iu the past for absolute harmony 
has prevailed and nothing has occurred 
that would tend to pi'omote jealousy or ill 
feeling. 

We may reasonably hope this year to 
have a nine that will play good ball and 
represent the college in a gentlemenly man- 
ner when they visit other institutions. 



MAILS. 
Mail leaves college for P. O. at 1 p. m. 
and 7 p. m. on week days. On Sunday it 
leaves at 4-45 p. m. At the P. O. mails 
close as follows : 

Boston. 

7-45, 8-30,10-15 a.m. ; 4-00, 6-45, 7-45 p.m. 

New York, Western and Southern States. 

7-45, 10-15 A. M. ; 4-00, 6-45, 7-45 p. m. 

Northampton, Springfield and Western 

Massachusetts. 

7-20, 10-15, 10-45 A. M. ; 6-45 p. m. 

Northern way, N. L. Northern. 

8-30 A. M. 

The treasurer will be at his office from 4 

to 5 p. M. on Saturdays throughout the 

term . 

The museum of natural history will be 
open to visitors from 1-30 to 3-30 each 
afternoon excepting Saturday and Sunday. 
The college library will be open from 2 
to 4 each afternoon, except Sunday, and 
from 6.30 to 8 each evening, except Sat- 
nrdaj- and Sunday. Also Sunday after- 
noon from 1 to 3. 

President Goodell will be at his office 
from 2 to 4 p. m. every afternoon except 
Saturday and Suudav. 



K B, DISKIIJSOI], D, D, S 



KELLOGG'S BLOCK, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Office Hours, 9 to 12 a. m., 1-30 to 5 p. M. 



4S='Ether and Nitrous Oxide Gas administered when 
desired. 



.A.T TEaEl 



/MHERST CASH SHOE STORE, 

Yon can get the most for your money. 
BOOTS AND SHOES, RUBBERS, OVER- 
SHOES, SLIPPERS, TRUNKS, 
AND BAGS. 



REPAIRING NEATLY DONE. 



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CASH EOW, AMHERST, MASS. 



AMHERST HOUSE 



LIYEBIEEED,7\ND SALE SABLE, 



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HACKS TO AND FROM ALL TRAINS, OM- 
NIBUSES. HACKS, DOUBLE AND 
SINGLE TEAMS PURNISHED 
AT SHORT NOTICE. 
CAREFUL DRIVERS. FAIR PRICES. 

AMMEItST, MA.SS. 



Slieet Music, 



Music Books, 



String's 

FOR THE VIOLIN, BANJO, GUITAR, 



Cushman's Music Store, 



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DBALKUS IN 



FANCY GROCERIES, CROCKERY, CIGARS, 

CIGARETTES, TOBACCO, FRUITS 

AND CONFECTIONERY, 

LftlQP GOODg MID KEI{OSEI]E OIL 

SDoors Soutn of r. O., - A3IHBMST, MASS. 



AND DEALERS IN 



Hals, Caps, Furs, Truoks, Bags, Fiiriiisliiog Goods, 

Latest Stj'les in Furuishings. Agent for 

Knox's and Youmau's Hats. Sole 

Agent for Pittsfield 

Laundry. 

Hats Repaired. Furs Renovated. 

Give us a call Ijefore purchasing. 
NO. 5 l^jaaSNIX MOW, AMSJEJRST, MASS. 



AMHERST, MASS. 

The undersigned is pleased to announce 
to his former patrons and others desiring 
Game Spreads or Dinners, that he is always 
prepared to accomodate (at short notice) 
large or small parties. 

Ample dining room capacity for 200 peo- 
ple. 

LORENZO CHASE, Prop'R. 



.(.DENTISTS.^^).. 

C. S. GATES, D. D. S. 
T. G. HUKTIN^GTON, D. D. S. 

CUTLES'S BLOCK, AMBUnST, MASS. 



OFFICE IIOUES : 
9 A.. 1>/L. TO 5 I». 3WE. 

Ether and Nitrous Oxide adnihiistered when 
■desired. 



EDWIN NELSON, 

Books and Stationery, 

Next door to Post Office, 
AMHERST, MASS. 



WOOD'S HOUSE 

HftlJS D5Eg2II]S 500IIJS, 

Razors Honed and Shears Sharpened at 
short notice. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



PHOTOGRAPHS. 

The place to go for photographs is at 

® I^ENPIELD'S SfPUDIO * 

AMITY ST., AMHERST, MASS. 

TINTYPES TAKEN. 

CABINJSTS at $2.00, .fiS.SO and $3.00 per dos. 

All worli warranted first class and satisfac- 
tory. Sittings made without regard to weatlier. 
Instantaneous process used. 

0. R. KENFIELD, 

PHOTOGRAPHER. 



I V_>' I 



H 



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WftT(5HB2, SLOKKg, JBWELI^Y 

FINE POCKET CUTLERY, SILVER AND 

PLATED WARE, OPTICAL GOODS 

CANES, SPORTING AND 

FANCY GOODS, 

Gold Pens, Fine Stationery 



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AND SENSITIZED PAPER, READY 

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PRINTING FOR AMATEURS 

Done in tlie best manner. 



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Massachusetts Agricultural College, 




A.mlierst, ^MeiiSiS. 



-^ T^ 6. //'. K^^.^.c^a^l^ . 




VOL. I. 



AMHERST, MASS., APRIL 29, 1891. 



NO. 14. 



k 



I 



*ERlMTEiRS,* 

AMHERST, - - MASS. 



Mass. Agricultural College, 

■ Botanical Department, 

AMHEEST, MASS. 

We wonUl iiifonii the friends of the college, 
and tlie public generally, that we are prepared 
to supply 

FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES ANT) 

SHRUBS, SMALL FRUITS AND 

PLANTS, 

true to name, also 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

all at the lowest price. 

For Trees, Plants, Shrul^s, Flowers and Small 

Fruits, address. 

Prof. S. T. Maynard, 

^AMHERSr. MASS 



THE AMHERST 



i@^/\l 



FURNITURE /ND CARPET STORE, 



.'%|#cf 



A complete line of goods suited to the students' 
wants. 

BEDSTEADS, MATTRESSES, PILLOWS, 



STUDY DESKS AND CHAIRS, 
LOUNGES 



WINDOW SHADES, DRAPERIES, 

CARPETS, RUGS, ETC., ETC. 



All {foods Stricftt/ Cash and at Lowest l*rices. 



E. D. MARSH, 



C. H, SANDERSOt^& CO,, 



CASH DEALKKS IN 



10 PHCENIX KOW, 



AMHEEST, MASS. 



PII]E gDOTSII]®;^ 

Hats, Caps, Umbrellas, -and Gents' 
Furnishing Goods. 



CASH ROW, 



AMHERST. 



k Thompson, 

iAIjERS IN 

Dry and Fancy Goods, 



C\SH DEALERS IN 



HOSIERY, RIBBONS, 'AND SMALL 
WARES OF ALL KINDS, 

AMHERST, MASS, 



BOOTSPSHOES 

FOR EVERYBODY, 



A FINE UNE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, 
BALS. AND CONGRESS, 

A FULL LINE OF 

HXTBEEE, OOOrJS, 

rooT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 

Repairing Done Promptly. 

T. W. SLOAN, 
s PsasNix MOW. 



S, J, SULLIVAN, 



JEALEK IN 



Second- Hand Clothes 

AND 

FUENITUEE. 

I^Ordevs promptly attended to.,^ 
1>, 0, Box, 319 AMHERST, MASS, 



WHERE DO YOU BUY m\ 

Meerschaum Pipes? 
French Briar Pipes? 
Choice Tobacco? 
Sponges? 
Soap? 

Hair Brushes from 25 cts. up? 
Combs from' 5 cts. up? 
Choice New Yorli Confectionery ? 
Shaving Mugs? 
Shaving Soap? 
Lather Brushes? 

Cigarettes, fresh every two weeks? 
The Best Soda in America? * 

The Best Bay Rum? 
Imported Perfumes? 
Prescriptions prepared by licensed pharmacists? 
Imported Domestic Tooth Brushes? 

If you have not obtained these necessaries at 
DEUEL'S DRUG STORE, you have begun 
wrong. Deuel's is the leading Drug Store In 
Western Mass., and keeps the largest assort- 
ment of goods at bottom prices. 



EUEL'S D1& STORE 

Ainlierst House Block, Amherst, lass. 



HENRY ADAMS, 



PHARMACIST, 



NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, 



AMHEEST, MASS, 



Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORT- 
ED AND DOMESTIC CIGARS, 
CIGARETTES, ETC., 
MEERSCHAUM AND. BRIAR PIPES, 
FISHING TACKLE AND SPORTING GOODS, 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, and Sporting 
and Springfield Rifles, 

Sunday and night calls responded to at resi- 
dence, first door west of Wood's Hotel, 

^rugs, Medicines, 

TOILET ARTICLES, 

CONFECTIONERY, CIGARS, CIGARETTES 

AND SMOKERS' GOODS. 



l^XfYSICrANS' PMBSCMXPTIOlfS CAMM- 

pulijY compounded, 



% p»]^n]S0Y, 



6 PHCENIX ROW. 

Order your COAIi liere. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



VOL. I. 



AMHERST, MASS., APRIL 29, 1891. 



No. 14 



ARBUTUS. 
Safe hidden from the careless gaze of man 
The fragrant buds and blossoms lie at rest, 
Above, the sighing wind or pattering rain 
Alike distnrbs them not. In slumber deep 
They lie, and naught can wake them from their 

sleep 
'Till the appointed moment when some breeze 
More soft, or song of bird more full and sweet. 
Or ray of sunlight penetrates the gloom 
And whispers that the time of springing flowers. 
That May herself has come. 
But for him only who with reverent tread 
Patiently seeks within the mossy bed, 
For him each sweet pink blossom lifts its 

head 
And sheds such wealth of fragrance on the air. 
Such richness of perfume and beauty rare. 
Such light from darkness, life from death 

arisen. 
As mortals seldom dream of, 
A bit of Eden left to brighten earth 
And whisper of the Paradise where flowers 
As sweet and fair, forever more shall bloom. 



HARVARD UNIVERSITY. 

Harvard Unlversit}', the oldest college in 
the United States, was founded at Cam- 
bridge, Mass., in 1736, sixteen j'ears after 
the settlement of the colony. In 1639 it 
was given its name in honor of Rev. John 
Harvard, who gave very liberally for its 
foundation and support. 

At the outset it was lar inferior and dif- 
ferent from what it is to-day. At that 
time it was little more than an Indian 
school, with few students and studies, but 
now it has but a little less than one hun- 
dred elective courses, besides the regular 
courses, and where it graduated nine men 
including one Indian in 1642, it now grad- 
uates several hundred annually. 

Its first president. Rev. John Dunster, in 
1640, started the college upon its road of 
fame, until now "Harvard," ''Crimson" 
and " Pres. Eliot" are bye-words through- 
out the educational world. 

At first designated to be of Unitarian 
denomination, it has since outgrown this on 
account of the overseers being elected by 
the Legislature, thus obliterating any pos- 
sible partisan feeling. 

The college to-day consists of many large 
and beautiful buildings, nearly all built by 
individual bequests, alumni and students' 
subscriptions. Besides the regular college 
there are four professional schools connect- 
ed with it:— Law, Theology, Medicine, 



and Science. The whole is controlled by 
a board consisting of the Presideut of the 
College, Treasurer, five Fellows, and Over- 
seers. 

Ranking one of the first in the educa- 
tional line, it also holds the same rank in 
the athletic field, having but few worthy 
opijonents in the college world, Yale, 
Princeton and Columbia. 

Nine times out of fourteen, its Mott 
Haven team has secured first honors, while 
Yale and Princeton have each secured them 
but once. As regards its past intercol- 
legiate records it cannot be equalled by any 
American College, although Yale in late 
years is a close opponent. 

In athletic games it has been iraprove- 
iug, although for a few years previous 
to the season of '89, in both base-ball and 
foot-ball, the other large colleges were a 
little its superior. The last year's work, 
however, shows great things to come for 
the Crimson standard, as can be seen by 
her defeat of Yale in both the popular 
sports. In rowing, Harvard has carried 
the pennant just enough to show her great 
superiority in this sport. 

Many professionals and record-breakers 
are seen in Harvard alumni and student 
records. Such men as Shaw and Sears in 
tecnis. Bates in base-ball, and Lake, Cum- 
nock and Trafford in foot-ball, are worthy 
of mention. 

Harvard, like all other colleges, has its 
numerous fraternities and supports some of 
the best chapters. Among the most noted 
is Alpha chapter of the Phi Beta Kappa 
Fraternity which is composed entirely of 
honor men, and all high class orders are 
represented. Of the local clubs, the Hasty 
Pudding Club is best known, especially in 
the society world, for its brilliant amateur 
theatricals. 

Of the college publications the Daily 
C/'imso?i is best known. There are also pub- 
lished the LamjMon, Advocate, and numer- 
ous others, including The Index. 

Christian work iu the college is carried 
on under direction of the college Y. M. C. 
A., which has branches in each class and 
department, and much good work is accom- 
plished both by students and alumni. This 
work is greatly helped by the several Total 
Abstinence societies and religious orders. 



Summing the whole, in a little, it can be 
said that Harvard is an honor to the " Old 
Bay State," of which all should be ijroud. 

T. F. K. 



"THE BOOKE OF HUFBANDRYE." 

In this age of scientific agriculture we 
have a great abuudnnco of agricultural lit- 
erature. Much of this is of practical use 
to the farmer but at the same time much 
is of a very inferior quality or of no value 
at all. Agricultural papers and periodi- 
cals form a large share of this literature 
but the books written on the subject are 
by no means to be overlooked. 

It was when agriculture began to be re- 
garded as a science, and the chemist 
and the mechanic gave it his attention that 
the amount of agricultural literature began 
to increase ; but it is a comparatively short 
time since such publications were not only 
very rare but in some places unheard of. 

However, agricultural literature of some 
kind has existed ever since the invention 
of the printing press, when men first be- 
gan to express their thoughts in type. As 
we know, the writings of that period are 
somewhat obscure to the modern reader, 
and a printed book of the fifteenth or six- 
teenth century is a curiosity indeed. 

But although the artof printing was in its 
infancy, men could think in that period as 
well as in the present day, and if one will 
take the time to decipher a few publica- 
tions of that time he will in many cases 
feel repaid for his trouble. In the college 
library there are man}' old books of this 
description dating back to the sixteenth 
and seventeenth centuries. 

In looking over these volumes the wri- 
ter chanced to find a unique specimen of 
typography which is interesting not only 
for its age and appearance but also for the 
matter it contains. 

The book in question is a small affair, 
bound in leather and ornamented with 
gilt. On the back is the date 1562, a lit- 
tle over a hundred years since the first 
book was printed from movable types. 
The volume is printed in heavy german 
type on coarse brOwn paper. On the title 
page we find these words : 

"The booke of Hufbandrye, very profitable 
and neceffary for all maner of perfons. Now 
lately corrected and amended wyth divers ad- 
dicions put ther unto." 



io6 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Turning over we fiiid the "Aiictlior's 
Pi'ologe," after which we enter upon tlie 
body ol" the book. 

"Here begynneth the booke of hufbancUye, 
and flrf t whereby huflxanclmen doo lyve. 

"The mostgeueralllyviug that huf bandes can 
have, is by plowyng, fowlug of their corn 
reaping, breeding of their cattel, and not the 
one wythont the other. Then is the plough the 
most neceffarieft inftrnraent that an Imfband 
can occupy, wherefore it is convenient to be 
knoweu, how a plough fhould be made." 

Here at llie beginning it is very evident 
that the "aucthor" is well acquainted with 
his subject. How well we can apply his 
words to the present day ! Is not the plow 
still the "most neceffarieft" instrument 
that a farmer can use? 

But we caunot sto[) to consider all he 
says conceraing the plow but simply to 
notice a few of the chapter heads on the 
subject. 

"Divers maners of plowes." 

"To know the names of all partes of the 
plowe." 

"The temporing of the plowes." 

"The ueceffary thinges that belongeth to a 
plough, cart, and wayne." 

"Whitlier is better, a plow of horfef or a 
plow of Oxen." 

After treating of plows ; how to plow, 
when to plow, and what to plow, the 
"aucthor" takes up the crops and gives 
careful and particular direeti'ins how to 
sow and harrow them. The following are 
a few of the subjects : 

"How to know divers maner of weeds." 

"To mow grafte." 

"To tedde and make hey." 

"How rye fhould be fhorii." 

"How to fheare wheate." 

"To mow barley and oats." 

"To reap and mow pease and beanes." 

After dwelling for considerable length 
on the harve.<ti ng of crops, the writer sud- 
denly changes his subject and takes up 
live stock something after this fashion. 

"To make an eweto love herlambe. If the 
ewe have mylke and wyll not love her latnbe, 
put her in a narrowe place made of boardes,and 
put the lambe to her, if the ewe f mite the lambe 
with her head binde her head with a hey rope 
or cord to the fide of the pen, if fhe wyil not 
ftand f idelong call the ewe and give her a little 
hey and tye a dog by her that fhe may fee hym, 
and this wyll make her love her lambe shortly." 

This valuable advice was probably given 
fiom experience. It certainly sounds 
reasonable. 

Over toward tlie back of the book there 
is a treatise on animals and their diseases 
which would certainly prove interesting to 



Here 



those studying veterinary sciene 
are some extracts. 

"Blyndnes of fhepe and other difeafef, and 
remedies therfor. There be f ome fhepe that 
wyll be blynde a feafou and yet mend again. 
And yf you put a little tar in his eye he will 
mend the rather, there be divers waters and 
other medicines wold mend hym, but this is the 
most comd medicine the shepards use. 

"The gout without remedy. There bee 
beastes that will have the gout, and most com- 
monly in the hinder f eete, it wyll cause hym to 
halt and go ftarkely and I kuew never man 
who could helpe it or fynde remedy therfor. 

"A fpaviu is an yl forance, where upon he 
wyl halt, fpecially in the begynning, appereth 
on the hinder legges within and against the 
joynt. And feme horfef have through fpavin 
appereth both wythin and wythout, those be yl 
to be cured." 

To com[)lete the whole there are a num- 
ber of pages devoted to duties of the 
housewife, and also several chapters on 
different religious subjects. The "Table to 
this present booke" follows while at the 
bottom of this very last page is the im- 
print as follows : 

"Imprinted at London by John Awdelye, 
dwellyng in lytle , Britayn ftrete, by great 
Saynt Bartelmewes." 

Such is the "booke of Husbandrye." 



A REVERIE. 



As the eastern sun was rising 

One morning long ago. 
Its bright rays fell like crystals 

Upon the earth below. 

They rested on the meadows,. 
Upon the bright flowers on the hill 

And stretched away far eastward, 
On the Connecticut, smooth and still. 

It was not a flowing river 

As we see it here to-day, 
It was a lake serene and calm. 

And extended far away. 

The bright flowers were on its border. 
The green trees hung lightly o'er 

The ever-ceaseless silvery waves. 
As they splashed against the shore. 

As we look upon these shining waves, 

They are rolling on and on 
Until they lash against the sides 

Of Mounts Holyoke and Tom. 

Long liave these grand old mountains 
In the days that have gone past 

Resisted the wear of these silvery waves. 
But must give away at last. 

As we pass along life's rough journey. 
If difficulties come in our way, 

"We must thus try and overcome them, 
Little by little, day by day. 

B. H. 



FIRST BANQUET. 

OF 

AGGIE LIFE EDITORS, 

Held at Amherst at 10 P. M, April 24th, 1891. 

E. P. Felt, Toastmaster. 

Toasts. 

O. V. B. Lage, The New Board. 

Song, Here's to Aggie College. 
A. G. Eames, College Journalism. 

H. N. Legate, , The Ladies. 

Song, Rosalie. 
H. E. Crane, The Old Board. 

G. B. Willard, Other College Papers. 

Song, Vive 1' Armour. 
The Editors of Aggie Life held their 
first banquet at Wood's Hotel on the eve- 
ning of the 24th, both the old and new 
boards being present. The table was taste- 
fully arranged with the college colors and 
it may be safely said that the maroon and 
white never blended more harmoniously 
with each other and with their surround- 
ings. Full justice was done to the ample 
menu which was served in Frank's usual 
able style, the editors fully proving that 
even literary men do not live upon air. 
After the various courses had been fully 
discussed, the table was cleared and the 
company adjourned to the parlor, \fter a 
few songs they returned to the supper 
room and over the fruit and nuts abandoned 
themselves fully to the spirit of the occa- 
sion. The Goddess Nicotiaua was invoked 
and under her potent influence the orators 
of the evening rose to bursts of eloquence 
of which they had not before deemed them- 
selves capable. The exercises of the even- 
ing were ably conducted by the Toast- 
master, Mr. Felt, and the toasts were all 
responded to in a pleasing and witty man- 
ner. When the formal toasts had been 
responded to, it was evident that the com- 
pany were not yet satisfied and a number 
of impromptu toasts were proposed by the 
toastmaster and responded to by the other 
gentlemen. Several hours were thus pleas- 
antly passed and when at last the company 
broke up it was with the feeling that they 
had spent a most enjoyable evening and 
fully rounded out the first year of Aggie 
Life. The enjoyment of the occasion 
was somewhat marred by the absence of 
Mr. R. H. Smith, '92, who, because of ill- 
ness, was unable to attend. He may be 
sure that his absence was sincerely regretted 
and that the thoughts of his comrades went 
out to him even in the midst of their festiv- 
ities. 



LESSONS FROM OUR ALUMNI LIST. 
The alumni are the produce of a college 
and as such represent the practical value of 
the course of study pursued in the college 
to those who take it. When the compara- 



AGGIE LIFE. 



107 



tive merits of different college courses are 
to be determined, it is natural to seek the 
alumni list and find out what the graduates 
are doing in the world. 

Every institution ought to be, and gener- 
ally is proud of its alumni and hence 
nearly all colleges and similar educational 
institutions publish catalogued lists of its 
graduates, showing their occupation and 
other data which would be of interest. It 
is apparent that a college course can 
not insure prosperity to a man without 
any effort of his own, but it can assist him 
in bringing out and develoi)ing those traits 
of character which will detei'mine, to a 
great extent, his success in life. And in 
so far as a course does this it will be advan- 
tageous to the student who takes it. 

Any friend of this institution need not 
hesitate to show and refer to our alumni 
list when wishing to reflect credit to the 
college. As we begin with the first grad- 
uate and read down through the list we find 
men who, as a general rule, are making a 
success of life. Some are doing remarkably 
well and nearly all have promising futures 
before them. And not only is this true in 
those occupations which the college is spec- 
ially designed to prepare for, but also in 
other lines of work which are generally 
supposed to be impracticable to graduates 
of an Agricultural college. 

If, under the somewhat discouraging 
circumstances of its earlier years, this col- 
lege has been able to graduate such men as 
we find among our alumni, what may we 
not expect as coming years shall bring 
better advantages to the student, from our 
future alumni. Every graduate that be- 
comes successful in the occupation in which 
he enters is an advertisement which will 
materially benefit the college. It must be 
apparent to each student that he will be in 
some degree responsible for the welfare of 
the college, in that the influence of his 
Alma Mater shows itself to be beneficial to 

him or not. 

If that class of people who suppose that 

the four years in this college are passed in 
learning how to " hoe taters an' sech like " 
and that the graduates are prepared only 
to make pretty fair farm hands, would take 
the pains to study our alumni list, they 
would be better prepared to say whether 
this course is beneficial or not to a young 
man than they apparently are at present. 
For they will find that while agricultural 
and kindred occupations are well repre- 
sented, the graduates are by no means 
restricted to these, but have helped fill the 
ranks of nearly every profession, and en- 



gaged in a great variety of occupations, 
successfully. 

In conclusion, it may be safe to say that 
we are in no way ashamed of our alumni, 
and if we are so fortunate as to graduate 
from this institution, we will take our places 
in the ranks of those in whose footsteps we 
are following and enter life with head erect, 
conscious of being graduated from an insti- 
tution of wliich we may be proud. 

F. S. H. 



AN ORCHESTRA AT M. A. C. 

Having noticed a pai'agraph in No. 13 
of Aggie Life, devoted to the subject of 
an orchestra at M. A. C, I would like to 
add, " Why not!" Those of us who were 
at the college in '79 and '80 will, perhaps, 
remember the college orchestra of that 
time, and the members of that orchestra 
who may happen to see these lines will, 
doubtless, recall many pleasant hours 
passed in the old Chapel which was our 
place of meeting. With six or seven 
pieces, it did not take us long to form an 
organization which was kept up with un- 
failing interest until most of us bade good- 
bye to "Aggie, "when for some unaccount- 
able reason the classes coming after us 
allowed the whole matter to drop, and I 
believe it has never since been revived 
except in name. 

We met about once a week throughout 
the college year, and as we were fortunate 
in having as members men who thoroughly 
enjoyed music, an absence was rarely 
noted. 

Of course, with regular practice we all 
improved in our playing, both individually 
and as a whole, and I feel sure that we all 
experienced a great deal of pleasure and 
profit from our organization. 

I take the liberty also to say that the 
noises we made were not too trying to the 
ears of the other students, and that, judg- 
ing by the the audiencs we drew at our 
rehearsals, our humble efforts were appre- 
ciated by the whole college. 

Why cannot all this be done again ? 
Surely a more profitable means of passing 
a leisure evening could not be found, and 
nothing need be said to those who would 
be eligible, concerning the real pleasure to 
be derived from it. 

One of the Old Orchestka. 



COMMUNICATION. 
Kyoto, Japan, March 14, 1891. 
Mr. E. p. Felt. Amherst. 

My Dear Sir : — Your favor of 
Feb. 5th was duly received, and I have al- 



so received through the Board's treasurer 
the $58.01 for the student whom I selected 
after some delay, waiting to find a really 
needy and worthy one. This Mr. Sakata, 
as I may have mentioned, is in the theo- 
logical course and will graduate in June 
next year. He is a diligent and faithful 
student, and I think there is every reason 
to hope he will do good work as a preacher. 
His family circumstances are such that he 
could not have remained in the school with- 
out this assistance, so the uivers of the 
money may feel that tlu'ir gonei'ous gift is 
used where it is needed and where it is 
pretty sure to do permanent good. I hope 
the students may feel inclined lo continue 
their generosity, and I have no doubt an- 
other good student will be found for it 
after Mr. Sakata graduates. 

I will ask him to write again after a 
time. 

I am glfd to hear so good an account of 
the college. We feel that Japan has 
much connection wiih it through the college 
at Sapporo. One of our teachers here was 
a student under Pres. Clark at that insti- 
tution. Pres. Goodell was one of my 
teachers at Easthampton many years ago, 
and I should be glad to be remembered to 
him, though I fear he did not find me a 
very promising scholar in his departments. 
Yours very truly, 
D. W. Learned. 



LAMENTA VIBGINES. 
Now trembling hangs the setting sun 

Above the Tiber's wave, 
The beautious red aucl gleaming gold 

Shines on our city brave, 
But blackness dense is on my soul 

And, dark seems life to be 
For 0,_the gods, the cruel gods, 

Have turned my love from me. 

Clitus beloved, thy Roman maid 
Loves on, and lives in grief. 

'Tis only Death that pallid One 
To her can bring relief .1 

My people pour libations forth 
But I, I cannot pray, 

For O, the gods, the cruel gods, 
■ Have ta'en my love away. 



PRAYER MEETING TOPICS. 
April 30th —Does Sin Pay ? Romans 6:21. 

A. H. Kirkland. 
May 3rd— Observance of the Sabbath. 

Ex. 20:8. F. I. Parker. 
May 7th — A Successful Missionary. Jonah 

3:1-5. E. P. Felt. 
May 10th— Value of the Gospel. Blatt. 
13:45-46. H. D. Clark. 



io8 



AGGIE LIFE. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Published Fortnightly by the Students of the 
Mass. Agricultural College. 

Terms $1,00 per year, in advance. Single copies, 10c. 



Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 



JSOAJtD OP EDTTOItS: 

JI. E. CRANE, '92, Editor-in-Chief, 
G. B. WILLARD, '93, Business Manager, 
G. E. TAYLOR, 'Oa, E. H.- SMITH, '92, 

G. F. CUKLET, '03, B. SEDGWICK, '93, 

C. P. WALKER, '94. 



Address all commnuications to the Business Manager. 



tM.?t\\-^t^ ^ \ka?,t'ftQ^%.t^ VWH^^tViS. 



We publish wilii pleasure an article from 
au old alumnus, and it would be very 
agreeable lo us all, if we could have articles 
from some of the alumni that we might 
insert in each issue, for our students always 
take a great delioht in reading about the 
happenings at Aggie years ago. All grad- 
uates of M. A. C. have some pleasant 
recollections of their stay at Aggie, and 
these reminiscences would be very inter- 
esting to the present students. Let us 
have more communications that we may 
have a closer union between alumni and 
students. 



We rejoice in the fact that we have a 
paper in which we can express our thoughts. 
Forebearanee may be the better way, but 
we cannot refrain from commenting on 
that disgraceful scene that greeted us last 
Sabbath morning, as we entered the Ciiapel. 
We are willing to uphold the students in 
everytiiing that is just and riglit, but in 
justice to ourselves we are happy to say 
that the majority regard this as a vei-y 
disreputable act, and have expressed great 
indignation at such proceedings. Jokes 
and tricks often occur iu our college life, 
but to adorn the house of God with such 
ornaments is a serious affair. It is no 
joke. It is an insult to our pastor, a 
disgrace to our students, and it biings 
condemnation upon the pesons who com- 
mitted the deed. The strangei's present at 
Chapel last Sunday morn must have 
thought the morality of the college was 
at a low ebb, if such acts were justified by 
all tlie students. INIay such a thing never 
occur again. We hope that the perpetra- 
tors will be brought speedily to justice, for 
such men are not needed iu an institution 
of this kind. 



A CUSTOM which was practiced on one 
or two occasions by classes since the foun- 



dation of the college, and one which 
always meets with the liearty commenda- 
tion of the faculty in general, was adopted 
by '93 on the recent Arbor Day. That is, 
the [jlanting of a grove, to be used in 
future years for the delivering of class 
orations. The situation is about fifty feet 
west of old Chapel. All kinds of local 
shade trees were set out, the smaller ones 
on the outside, the larger generalh' occupy- 
ing the central places according to their 
habits of growth. This is a practice 
which should be kept up in the future. It 
is not only a fitting observation of Arbor 
Day which is granted us, but it will be- 
come a source of great pleasure to the class 
in years to come. We earnestly hope 
that this grove will not share the fate of 
the one which was recently removed to 
permit the construction of a road. The 
work of a class in beautifying the grounds 
is holy to its members, and it should be 
thoroughly considered before any such 
step is taken. 



There is an evil which has long been 
prevalent in college, and one which under 
existing circumstances is quite difHcult to 
remedy. That is the distant social rela- 
tionship between the student body and the 
faculty. A man seeing one of his instruct- 
ors in the classroom only, forms an opinion 
of him. It may be a good one. But if 
he doesn't happen to like the branch, it is 
oftentimes a pretty poor one. The result 
of this is quite obvious. No interest will 
be taken in the study and a well defined 
enmitj' on the part of the student will 
finally ensue. He will take every possible 
opportunity of avoiding the unfortunate 
member of the faculty, both in recitation 
and out, and as a natural consequence, 
development of mental capacity will be 
slow. Occasionally we find a professor 
who never misses a chance of conversing 
with the students, and appearing as con- 
genial as possible to them at all times. He 
is the man that, as a rule, gets along best 
with his classes, and makes the most 
progress in his department. However, 
more interest is taken in that direction by 
the students where such a course is taken 
than otherwise. Strictness of discipline 
must be observed in the classroom. There 
is no doubt as to that. But outside, the 
pleasanter • the connections between the 
professor and student, the better will be 
the results at the end of the course and the 
more pleasure will the man experience in 
after life looking back on college days. 



The first few games of the season have 
been played and the college has had a 
chance to see about what kind of a team it 
is going to support this year. But it need 
not be thought that the playing in these 
games is a sample of What we are going to 
have later in the season. It is far from 
that, for with a few more practice games, 
our men will settle down more to their 
work, get over their nervousness, and plaj' 
together more ; three things which cannot 
be learned in the practice games with the 
second team, as the fellows will not put the 
proper spirit into them. But if we expect 
a good team this year, we must give the 
players the proper support. It is not 
supporting a team by going out on the 
campus t.o watch a game and abuse a 
player every time he makes an error or 
strikes out. The best of players make 
errors and a good many poor plays, and 
we cannot expect our team is going to put 
up an errorless game. The best way to 
help our team is to applaud every good 
play and say nothing when poor plays are 
made. When a man makes an error he 
usually gets nervous and is not likely to 
play as good a game afterwards, if every- 
one is talking against him. It is a notice- 
able fact that it is usually those who have 
never tried to play ball and have never 
played iu a game, that do all the talk- 
ing. It looks easy enough to play, but 
wait until you get out there and it is a 
different thing. But one thing the team 
does need, is waking up before the game. 
Take the last game with Amherst '94, for 
example. It was not until after the third 
inning when Amherst made those four runs 
that our fellows seemed to wake up. After 
those runs were made they fielded better, 
batted stronger and seemed to take an 
interest in the game, but they cannot do 
that way with every team, because they 
will meet teams that they will have hard 
work to beat and they cannot afford to give 
them four runs to start with. So now, 
boys, wake up, and play ball for all you 
are worth from the beginning of the game. 
Now one word as to the treatment of 
visiting nines. The freshman team came 
up here and played a good gentlemanly 
game throughout. They did not yell at 
our fellows or try to break them up, and 
j'et that was just what was done to one of 
their players as he was about to catch a 
ball. It is all right to give the college 
yell when a run is scored or a good play 
made, but as for breaking up a man by 
hooting at him, it is disgraceful. We all 
want our team to be treated fairly when 



AGGIE LIFE. 



log 



it goes away ; but we eauuot expect it, if 
we ourselves do not give visiting teams 
good treatmeut. .So after this let us do 
unto otiiers as we would that they should 
do uuto us. 



GLEANING-S. 

Did you go to the fiie? 

April 20, the Seniors appear with caues. 

April 19, Jones of Pelham catches a fly. 

M. H. Williams, '92, has returned to 
college. 

G. E. Taylor, '92, has moved to Mr. 
Gilbert's. 

J. B. Hull, '91, has returned after an 
extended vacation. 

April 18, the Seniors had their pictures 
taken at Greenfield. 

President Goodell resumed his duties 
last Monday morning. 

Work is rushing at both the Farm and 
Botanic departments. 

A. H. Kirkland, '94, spent a few days of 
last week at his home. 

The Sophomores are having field work 
in surveying, this term. 

Saturday being a legal holiday there was 
no inspection of rooms. 

The Freshman and his botany cau is a 
common sight now-a-days. 

April 23, illness prevented Hoyt, '93, 
from attending recitations. 

The fountain has been repaired and is 
once more in working order. 

The D. G. K. fraternity is making a 
tennis court at its club house. 

G. E. Taylor, '92, has been obliged to 
return home for a week or so. 

C. S. Graham, '92, is at work collecting 
insects for Professor Fernald. 

The Monson Academy nine practiced on 
the campus Saturdaj' morning. 

Professor Maynard has sold eighty 
thousand cabbage plants this season. 

E. T. Clark, '92, was injured in the face 
by a wire clotnes line at the recent fire. 

A temporary bridge has been built over 
the brook which crosses the botanic path. 

Details from the companies are having 
target practice when the weather permits. 

E. D. White, '94, has gone to Sherborn, 
Mass., where he will remain for a short 
time. 

Prof. S. T. Maynard has ploughed the 
strip of land north of the Stockbridge 
house. 



The Commencement exercises will oc- 
cur one week earlier, viz: Juue 7, 8, 9 
and 10. 

Mr. B. S. Ono, who lias been taking a 
special course in chemistry, has returned 
to Japan. 

John H. Kellogg, formerly of '93, was in 
town last week. It is reported that he will 
enter '94. 

After a long delay the class games have 
flnall3' been arranged, much to the satis- 
faction of all. 

The band has been engaged to play at 
the opening of the new athletic field of 
Amherst College. 

The directors of the reading room asso- 
ciation have voted to assess a tax of sixty 
cents for this term. 

The former board, of Aggie Life editors 
had their pictures taken at Lovell's last 
Saturday morning. 

A. G. Fames, '91, was obliged to return 
to his home April 21 to attend the funeral 
of his grandmother. 

The tennis court west of North College, 
formerly used by the D. G. K. fraternity 
has been abandoned. 

We publish in another column a letter 
concerning the student that our Y. M. C. 
A. is supporting in Japan. 

We can now boast of three nines, the 
college nine, the experiment nine, and the 
femi-nine at the Insectory. 

Professor Maynard was out of town Sat- 
urday, looking up experiments in connec- 
tion with the Hatch Station. 

Our boys have started out well in base- 
ball, and we hope they will keep up their 
record during the entire season. 

President Goodell has gone to New Lon- 
don, Ct., to recuperate. We hope that he 
may be speedily restored to health. 

The severe winter has had a bad effect 
upon the college lawns. In many places 
the grass has been completely killed. 

W. A. Brown, '91, and H. M. Howard, 
'91, are surveying the laud drained last fall 
preparatory to making a map of the same. 

Lieut. Cornish delivered a lecture in the 
armory April 21. Subject: " The Ameri- 
can Indian, as he is and as he should be." 

Conundrum — If each class in college 
plavs a game with each other class what 
will be the total number of games played ? 

April 21, an alarm of fire being given in 
town, a number of students started for the 
scene with the hose carriage but soon 
returned. 



We omitted in our last issue to state that 
Mr. R. H. Smith was elected Junior direc- 
tor of the reading-room association, at the 
mass meeting held some time ago. 
Games played : 

Aggie, 9; Amherst '94, 3. 
Aggie, 18 ; Amherst '94, 9. 
Aggie, 25 ; Monson Ao'dy, 7. 
Members of the battalion received an 
invitation to attend the competitive drill 
and ball of the Peabody Guards, M. V. M. 
in Springfield. 

The April bulletin of the Hatch Experi- 
ment Station is edited by Professor May- 
nard and contains directions for the use of 
fungicides and insecticides. 

The battalion has been reduced from 
four to three companies. The oliicers of 
the skeleton company are to, fill the places 
of absent officers of the other companies. 

The Sophomores observed Aibor day by 
planting a grove of trees west of the Old 
Chapel. The grove contains many choice 
varieties and iu time it will be a delightful 
spot. 

Teacher: " What is a synonym? " 

Bright Boy : " It's a word you can use 
in place of another one, when you don't 
know how to spell the other one. — Street 
and Smith's Good News. 

The following men from the Freshman 
class were chosen to speak before the Fac- 
ulty April 29th : Alderman, Averill, L. H. 
Bacon, Brown, Curtis, Cutter, Gifford, 
Jones, Parker, Sanderson, G. E. Smith, 
and Walker. From this number four will 
be selected for the Kendall Prize Speaking 
at Commencement. 

The following men from the Sophomore 
class spoke before the Faculty April 27th : 
H. D. Clark, C. A. Goodrich, E. C. How- 
ard, F. S. Hoyt, A. E. Melendy, J. R. 
Perry, B. Sedgwick, W. H. Ranney, H. F. 
Staples, C. A. Smith, L. W. Smith. The 
following were chosen to speak commence- 
ment week : Perry, Melendy, L. W. Smith, 
Staples. 

Next Saturday we play with Tufts Col- 
lege at College Hill and it gives all alumni 
in the eastern part of the state an oppor- 
tunity to see the old maroon and white. 
Our nine is working hard and is confident 
of playing a good game, so it would be 
very pleasing to them if a large number 
could be present, aud cheer them on to 
victory. 

A glee club has recently been organized 
in college with Mr. H. D. Clark as leader 
and Mr. 0. V. B. Lage, business manager. 



110 



AGGIE LIFE. 



The college has long felt the need of such 
an organization. The following are the 
members: First tenors, G. B. Willard, L. 
W. Smith, 0. V. B. Lage ; second tenor, 
G. O. .'^anford, E. C. Howard, T. S. Bacon ; 
first bass, H. D. Clark, H. M. Fowler; 
second bass, W. A. Brown, E. Rogers, 
S. B. Marvin. 

The Natural History meeting which was 
to have been held the 20th, was postponed 
until the 21st. The meeting was called to 
order by the president. After the general 
business was transacted, a letter was read 
from H. M. Thomson upon the work of the 
G.ypsy Moth commission, and of the possi- 
bilities of natural history work in connec- 
tion with the other work of those employed. 
After this, followed a highly instructive 
and entertaining dissection by President 
Shores and his assistants, the subject being 
a fat spring woodchuck. All who went 
report an interesting time. The next 
meeting will be held May 4th. 

SCHEDULE OF CLASS BASE-BALL 

GAMES. 
Seniors vs. Freshmen, April 27th. 
Juniors vs. Freshmen, April 29th. 
Seniors vs. Sophomores, May 1st. 
Juniors vs. Sophomores, May 13th. 
Sophomores vs. Freshmen, May 16th. 
Seniors vs. Juniors, May 20th. 

After this series of games is played, the 
two upper classes will play the two lower 
classes. 



CUTTING. 

" Who is the best man 

On the staff? " 

Asked a maiden 

Sweet and shy, 

As she glanced adown 

Tne columns of 

The weekly college sheet. 

The editor smiled 

And winked his eye 

At the fairy 

Maid demure ; 

" The best man on 

The paper? Why, 

Tlie scissors to be sure." 



-Ex. 



BASE-BALL. 

The base-ball season was opened April 
17 by a game with Amherst Freshmen. 
The game was called at 3.45 with Aggie 
at the bat. 

1st inning. Willard took first on four 
balls and stole second, going to third on 
Crane's sacrifice hit. Paige hit to Flicht- 
ner who caught Willard on third and com- 



Ruggles hit to left 



pleted a double play 
field and stole second and third. Crane 
came home. Parker took first on four 
balls and stole second. Curley filed out to 
Clieney. For Amherst. Pellet filed out 
to Legate. Flichtner.took first on a hit 
and went to second on a wild pitch by Crane. 
Cheney fouled out to Ruggles. Snell 
struck out. 

2ud inning. Legate struck out. How- 
ard was retired at first. Flelcher hit to 
Snell and got second on Snell's error, then 
stole third. Willard got first on an error 
by Laj', Fletcher scoring. Crane hit to 
Landis and was out. Landis went out 
Fletcher to Ruggles. Trask got first and 
second on Fletcher's errors. Breck went 
out Legate to Ruggles. Lay struck out. 

3d inning. Paige fllied out to Cheney. 
Ruggles was safe ()n first by Breck's error, 
and stole second. Parker went out Lan- 
dis to Pellet. Ruggles went to third. Cur- 
ley hit the ball for two bases bringing Rug- 
gles home. Legate flied out to Flichtner. 
Wood hit to Howard and was thrown out 
at first. Pellet struck out. Flichtner took 
first on Curley's error. Cheney made a base 
hit. Flichtner was out trying to steal 
home. 

4th inning. Howard hit for a base and 
stole second and third. Flichtner struck 
out. Howard scored on Willard's sacrifice 
hit. Crane flies out to Flichtner. Snell 
gets first on Legate's error. Landis makes 
a base hit, Snell going to second. Trask 
was out at first. Breck stole second, Lan- 
dis scoring on an error by Legate. Lay 
flied out to Legate. 

5th inning. Paige fouled to Lay. Rug- 
gles took first on an error by Flichtner and 
was out trying to steal second. Parker 
flied out to Flichtner. Weaver was out at 
first, Pellet and Flichtner failed to find the 
ball. 

6th inning. Curley flied out to Landis, 
Legale struck out and Howard fouled out 
to Pellet. Cheney and Snell strike out. 
Landis' hit for two bases and scored on 
Trask's single to centre field. Trask was 
retired trying to steal second. 

7th inning. Fletcher got first on Lan- 
dis' error and stole second. Willard flied 
out to Flichtner. Crane hit to Flichtner 
and was out at first, Fletcher scoring. 
Paige took first on a ground hit to Flicht- 
ner, stole secoud and third and scored on 
Ruggles' hit to centre field. Ruggles stole 
secoud and went to third on a passed ball, 
scoring on Parker's hit. Parker out trying 
lo steal secoud. Breck was thrown out 
at first b^' Legate. Lay hit to centre for 





Business ib business. FRANK WOOD will get up 
Spreads foi the Boys this winter. Send your orcJer» 
right along to get there first. 

-BOSS'S 

Go to BLODGE L'T & CLARK 
for CLO'iHS or FURNISHING 
GOODS. 

They keep the best hue and use 
the students well. 

Take your laundry to them Mon- 
day or Wednesday morning and 
you will get good work. 

BLODSETT ^ dhKSl 



.JOHN MULLEN, 



-DEALER m- 



MEATS and PROVISIONS, 

VEGETABLES OE ALL KINDS IN SEASON, 

EISH AND OYSTEES, EOEEIGN 

AND DOMESTIC ERXJITS, 

AND CANNED 

GOODS. 

Palmer's Block, Main Street. 



E. R. BENNETT, 
Jeweler, 

Optician, 

Watchmaker. 

FINE GGODS! LOW PRICES! 

GOOD WORK WARRANTED. 

First Door from Post Office. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Ill 



IF YOU WANT TO GET OYSTERS IN ANY 
STYLE GO TO 

E. B. ARNOLD'S 

0Y2TE^ gftPE 

Students are attended at sliort notice, 



Open all days of the week uiitn 12 o'clock. 
Sundaj's from 9 a. m. to 12-30 p. M., and from 
7 p. M. to 11 p. M. 

William's Block, Merchants' Row. 



The title page of this book was drawn and engraved by 

John S*^''^'S} 



6 Davis Street, 



BOSTON, MASS. 



The various publications of Bates, Bowdoin, Colbj', 
Tufts, Mass. Agricultural College, Wellesly and Yale 
have used his work. He will submit sketches and cari- 
catures for your approval. 



OFFICE OF 



EDWARD A. THOMAS, 

Fii|E/ftD Life If^suRANCE /ge^t. 

REAL ESTATE FOK SALE AND TO LET. 



Office f Coohs Block, Atnherst, Mass. 



GEO. GRAVES, 



DEALER IN 



Painters' Supplies 

Personal attention given to Frescoing, Dec- 
orating and Paper Hanging, and all 
Interior and Exterior 
House Painting. 

Pleasant St., near L J, Spear's Shop, 



AMHERST COLLEGE 

CO-OPERATIVE 8TEAI LAUNDRY 

and Carpet Renovaving Establlsliment, 



Aggie Agent, H. M. HOWARD, '91. 



"Work taken Monday delivered Wednesday. 

" " Wednesday delivered Saturday. 

S.A.TISF.A-CTIOKr OXJ.A.H.A.3SrTEBrD. 

OFFICE AT BRINE'S. 

H. A. UTLEY, Manager. 



tvro bases, advanced to third on Weaver's 
sacrifice liit to Ruggles. Pellet flied oiit'to 
Legate. 

8lli inning. Ciirley flied out to Landis. 
Legate was thi'own out al first by Landis. 
Howard liit for one base and stole second 
and tliird but was out trying to score on 
Fletcher's hit to Weaver. Flichtner hit a 
hot grounder to Crane and was out at first. 
Cheney flied out to Legate. Snell struck 
out. 

9th inning. Wiilard tooli first on four 
balls, stole second and was advanced to 
third on Crane's sacrifice hit to Flichtner. 
Paige was thrown out at first by Weaver. 
Wllhird scored on Lay's error. Ruggles 
went to first on four balls and stole second 
and third, and scored on Lay's wild throw 
to Breck. Parker hit for a base. Curley 
flied out to Lay. Landis hit to Crane and 
was out at first. Trask struck out. Breck 
hit to centre field, stole second and was out 
trying to steal third. 

The feature of the games was the fine 
playing of Flichtner and Landis for Am- 
herst, and the battery work and batting of 
Ruggles for the home team. 

-AGEICULTORAL COLLEGE. 





A E R 


R 


T B 


P O 


A 


E 


Wiilard, cf. 


4 1 











n 





Crane, p, 


5 1 





n 


1 


10 


n 


Paige, c, 


5 1 


1 


1 


12 


3 





Ruggles, lb. 


4 3 


2 


2 


8 





n 


Parker, rf , 


4 


1 


1 








n 


Curley, If, 


5 


1 


2 





n 





Legate, 2b, 


4 


(1 





4 


2 


1 


Howard, ss. 


4 1 


2 




1 





n 


Fletcher, 3b, 


4 2 








1 


1 


1 


Total, 


39 9 

AMHERST, 


7 
'94, 


8 


27 


16 


4 




A E E 


B 


T E 


PO 


A 


E 


Pellett, lb. 


4 


n 





9 





3 


Flichtner, ss, 


4 








n 


4 


n 


Cheney, cf. 


4 


1 


1 


4 


n 


n 


.Snell, rf. 


4 








1 


n 


1 


Landis, 2b, 


4 2 


1 


1 


1 


4 


n 


Trask, If, 


4 


1 


1 








1 


Breck, 3b, 


4 1 


2 


2 


1 


n 


1 


Lay, c. 


3 


1 


1 


5 





1 


Weaver, p, 


2 








1 


5 


2 



Total, 34 3 6 6 27 13 9 

Innings, 123456789 
Aggie, 11110030 2—9 

Amherst, '94, 2 1 0—3 
First base on errors— Aggie 5, Amherst '94, 3. First 
base on balls— Aggie 3, Amherst '94 0. Struck out— Ag- 
gie 3, Amherst '94 9. Two-base hits— Curley, Lay. 



Wednesday, Apr. 22, the second game 
with Amherst Freshmen was played, result- 
ing in a score of 18 — 9. Both sides play- 
ed a very loose game. If the third and 
fifth innings were blotted out of existence, 
the game would have been quite creditable 
to the team. The players cannot afford to 
get rattled iu such a manner as they did. in 
these innings, when eight runs were allow- 
ed to be made. Tlien again, the team did 
no batting until the score compelled it. 
Heavy hitting should be begun with the 
first man at the bat. 



ACUIClJLTUIiAL COLLEGE. 



A I! 

Wiilard, cf, n 

Crane, p, 6 

Paige, c, C 

liuggles, lb, 4 

Parker, rf, 6 

Howard, ss, 6 

Legate, 2b, .5 

Fletcher, 3b, 4 

Barton, If, 5 

Totals, 48 



R 


3 
3 
4 
» 

1 
1 
1 
3 



T B 
1 
) 
5 

.') 
2 
I 
1 

3 



18 



14 



Landis, 2b, 
Flichtner, ss. 
Lay, c, 3b, 
Snell, rf, 
Trask, If, 
Breck, 3b, p, 
Emerson, cf, c, 
Haskell, lb. 
Weaver, p, cf , 
Wood, p, 1st of in., 1 



AMHERST, '94, 
A B 

3 

4 
5 
.9 
5 
5 
4 
4 
3 



K 

1 
2 
1 
1 
2 
1 



1 



T B 


2 
2 




1 



3 



1' o 


A 


R 


.5 


1 





1 


13 


3 


1(1 


1 





.'5 





.■". 


(I 





n 





2 


1 


3 


1 


2 


3 


2 


2 


U 








27 


20 


13 


P O 


A 


E 


2 


3 


1 


2 


(1 





6 


1 


2 








1 


1 





1 


1 


1 


1 


4 





1 


11 





3 





7 


3 





1 






39 



27 



13 



13 



Total, 

Innings, 12 3456789 
Aggie, 3 10 7 5 2—18 

Amherst, 94, 4 4 1 0-9 

First base on errors— Aggie 7, Amherst '94, 8. First 
base on balls— Aggie -3, Amherat '94, 4. Struck out — 
Aggie 3, Amherst '94, 9. Two-base hit— Kuggle s 2, Bar- 
ton, Lay. Three-base hits— Paige 2, Wood. 

Aggie, 25 ; Monson Academy, 6. 

The third ball game of the season took 
place at Aggie last Saturday witii Monson 
Academy, Aggie winning by a score of 25 
to 6. The game was characterized by the 
lieav^' batting of the Aggies. For Aggie, 
Crane and Fletcher led at the bat and 
Dewey and Sedgwick for Monson. The 
first part of the game was played in a 
driving snow storm, which made good ball 
playing impossible. The game was called 
at the end of the seventh inning. 



Wiilard, cf, 
Crane, p, 
Paige, c, 
Ruggles, lb, 
Parker, 3b, 
Howard, 2b, 
Barton, rf, 
Curley, If, 
Fletcher, ss, 



2 
13 



16 




1 






Total, 


44 25 


15 


23 


21 


19 


3 




MONSON. 












A E R 


B 


T B 


P O 


A 


E 


Rho.ades, ss. 


4 1 


1 


2 





3 


2 


Sedgwick, p. 


4 1 


2 


2 


2 





2 


Ritter, lb. 


4 


1 


1 


7 





3 


Warren, rf, 


4 

















Dewey, c. 


2 3 


2 


2 


4 





I 


Converse, 3b, 


2 








2 


u 


2 


Thayer, cf. 


2 

















Hobbs, If, 


3 


1 


1 


3 








Amadon, 2b, 


1 1 








3 





4 



Total, 26 6 7 8 21 9 13 

First base on errors— Aggie 9, Monson 1. First base 
on balls— Aggie 4, Monson 5. Struck out— Aggie 4, 
Monson 12. Two-base hits— Craae, Pai-ker, Curley, 
Fletcher, Ehoads. Three-base hits— Crane, How- 
ard. Umpires— Lehert and Munson. Scorer— Rog- 
ers. 



COLLEGE NOTES AND EXCHANGES. 

The programs for Commencement at 
Amherst are out. 

At Dartmoutli twenty-seven Juniors have 
elected chemistry. 

Harvard University athletic meeting 13 
to be held May 2nd. 

Mr. A. A. Stagg is to train the Willis- 
ton Seminary base ball nine. 



112 



AGGIE LIFE. 



The expenditures of Princeton's foot 
ball eleven was over $15,000. 

Twenty-two ball games have been ar- 
ranged for the Brown University team. 

Yale has been taxed this year for the 
first time. The amount of saxes is about 
$40,000 

Yale University received gifts and be- 
quests to the amount of $1,161,312 the 
past year. 

The College of Physicans and Surgeous 
of New York intend to build a gymnasium 
in the spring. 

Alexander, of Amherst, put the shot 37 
ft. 10 in. at the athletic meet held at New 
Haven Blar. 21. 

The Seniors and Juniors of the Univer- 
sity of South Daifota liave petitioned the 
President to resign. 

The late P. T. Barnum has left $40,000 
to Tufts college to found a Barnum Mu- 
seum of Natural History. 

The Harvard freshman crew were 
swamped by a passing tug the first time 
they went out in a shell. 

The Harvard Overseers have voted 
down the proposition of the Faculty to 
established a three years course. 

Amherst's new catalogue just published 
shows a total of 3,319 alumni of whom one- 
third have been ordained ministers. 

Yale and Princeton will play a cham- 
pionship game of base ball on the Manhat- 
tan field, New York city, on June 13th. 

Leland Stanford university at Palo Alto, 
Cal.,is to have a campus containing seven- 
ty thousand acres with seventeen miles of 
driveway. 

The Legislature of West Virginia has 
made an nppropriation for a new building 
for the scientific school of the State 
University. 

Cambridge University students to the 
number of 1,400 have signed resolutions 
protesting against the admission of women 
to the university. 

A telegraph line operated by scientific 
students at the University of Micliigan, 
has two miles of wire and connects with 
the Western Union. 

The Princeton Faculty have decided that 
no special student will be allowed to play 
on any university team until he has been 
in college two terms of one year. 

All the Alumni ofWesleyan are being 
asked to vote on the question of changing 
the name of the college and to suggest any 
new name, if the change is favored. 



Girls attending college at Columbia, Mo., 
pay, under mutual agreement, a fine of 25 
cents each time they have a gentleman 
escort to whom they are not engaged. 

The Faculty of Brown University pro- 
pose to change the academic year from 
three terms to two. It also proposes to 
abolish the Senior vacation iu the early 
summer on the ground that the example of 
idle seniors is pernicious to the rest of the 
college. 

The undergraduates of Amherst have re- 
cently incorporated, under the laws of 
Massachusetts, the Amherst College Mu- 
sical Association, the object being to ob- 
tain active sympathy from the alumni which 
it is hoped will result sometime in the en- 
dowment of a professorship of music in 
the college. 



ALUMNI NOTES. 
Edgar Gregory '90, visited in Amherst 
last week. 

David Barry '90, visited the college last 
week. 

Burt L. Hartwell '89, assistant chemist 
at the Mass. Experiment station has ac- 
cepted a position as assistant chemist at 
Kingston, R. I., his duties to begin June Ist. 

The marriage engagement of Prof. 
Clarence D. Warner, Professor of Mathe- 
matics at M. A. C, and Miss Estelle 
Tyler of Springfield, Mass. is announced. 



MAILS. 

Mail leaves college for P. O. at 1 p. m. 
and 7 p. m. on week days. On Sunday it 
leaves at 4-45 p. m. At the P. O. mails 
close as follows : 

Boston. 
7-45, 8-30,10-15 a.m. ; 4-00, 6-45, 7-45 p.m. 
New York, Western and Southern States. 
7-45, 10-15 A. M. ; 4-00, 6-45, 7-45 p. m. 

Northampton, Springfield and Western 

Massachusetts,. 

7-20, 10-15, 10-45 A. M. ; 6-45 p. m. 

Northern way, N. L. Northern. 

8-30 A. M. 

The treasurer will be at his office from 4 
to 5 p. M. on Saturdays throughout the 
term. 

The museum of natural history will lie 
open to visitors from 1-30 to 3-30 each 
afternoon excepting Saturday and Sunday. 

The college library will be open from 2 
to 4 each afternoon, except Sunday, and 
from 6.30 to 8 each evening, except Sat- 
urday and Sunday. Also Sunday after- 
noon from 1 to 3. 

President Goodell will be at his office 
from 2 to 4 p. m. every afternoon except 
Saturday and Sunday. 



E, B, DIgKII]gOI], D. D, S 

^■DBI]TftL I^OOIIQS,-^ 



KELLOGG'S BLOCK, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Office Hours, 9 to 12 a. m., 1-30 to 5 p. m. 



a^Etber and Nitrous Oxide Gas administered when 
desired. 



A.T THE 



jMl^ CASH SHOE STOI[E, 

You can get the most for your money. 
BOOTS AND SHOES, RUBBERS, OVER- 
SHOES, SLIPPERS, TRUNKS, 
AND BAGS. 



REPAIRINGJEATLY DONE. 
HAWES & STINSON, 

CASH ROW, AMHERST, MASS. 



AMHERST HOUSE 



LIVERY, FEEDjND SALE SABLE. 



T, L PAIGE, Prop'r 



HACKS TO AND FROM ALL TRAINS, OM- 
NIBUSES, HACKS, DOUBLE AND 
SINGLE TEAMS FURNISHED 
AT SHORT NOTICE. 
CAREFUL DRIVERS. FAIR PRICES, 

AMBERST, MASS. 



Sheet ]Vrusic. 



Miasic Books, 



Strings 

FOR THE VIOLIN, BANJO, GUITAR, 



Cushman's Music Store, 



A.Ji/LIzLlEi'B.ST. 



J. M, WAITE & SON, 



AND DEALERS IN 



Hats, Caps, Furs, Trunks, Bap, Furiiisliini Goods, 

Latest Stj'les in Furuishings. Agent for 

Knox's and Youman's Hats. Sole 

Agent for Pittsfield 

Laundry. 

Hats Repaired, Furs Renovated: 

Give us a call before purchasing. 
NO. B VIKENIX ROW, AMJXEMST, MASS. 



AMHEKST, MASS. 



F)OWES ^ I^EIjLOGG, 



DEALEKS IN 



•^•STUDEp'g SUPPLIES'^ 

FANCY GROCERIES, CROCKERY, CIGARS, 

CIGARETTES, TOBACCO. FRUITS 

AND CONFECTIONERY, 

LitE^P (200DS fiI]D KEI(OSEI]E OIL, 

3Doors SouUi of f. 0., - AMBERST, MASS. 



EDWIN NELSON, 

Books and Stationery, 

Next door to Post Office, 
AMHERST, MASS. 



WOOD'S HOUSE 

»i:r D5Egsii](2 W)mi%, 

Razors Honed and Shears Sharpened at 
short notice. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



The undersigned is pleased to announce 
to his former patrons and others desiring 
Game Spreads or Dinners, that he is alwaj's 
prepared to accomodate (at short notice) 
large or small parties. 

Ample dining room capacity for 200 peo- 
ple. 

LORENZO CHASE, Prop'r, 



.(.DENTISTS.^5). 

C. S. GATES, D. D. S. 
T. G. HUNTINGTO]^, D. D. S. 

CUTLER'S BLOCK, AMICERST, MASS. 



OFFICE HOURS : 
9 A.. ]Vr. TO 5 I>. IvI. 

Ether and Nitrous Oxide administered when 
desired. 



PHOTOGRAPHS. 

The place to go for photographs is at 

<•& I^BNFIIELD'S SfTUDIO c* 

AMITY ST., AMHERST, MASS. 

TINTYPES TAKEN. 

CABINETS at $2.00, $2.30 and $3.00 per doz. 

All work warranted first class and satisfac- 
tory. Sittings made withont regard to weather. 
Instantaueons process used. 

G. R. KENFIELD, 

PHOTOGRAPHER. 



ao. p 



H 



H 



Maijt TallOF, 



.^:]S/mEE,ST, 



3!va:.A.ss. 



el. p. FJaWSON, 



DEALER IN 



J. L. LOV^ELL, 

'<aPHOTOSpPHB!{.b^ 

DRY PLATES, COMPOUND DEVELOPER 

AND SENSITIZED PAPER, READY 

FOR USE. 



PRINTING FOR AMATEURS 

Done in the best manner. 



AMHERST, MASS. 



WftTgfiES, (2LO0KS, JEWELRY 

FINE POCKET CUTLERY, SILVER AND 

PLATED WARE, OPTICAL GOODS 

CANES, SPORTING AND 

FANCY GOODS, 

Gold Pens, Fine Stationery 



REPARING NEATLY and PROMPTLY DONE. 



AMHERST, MASS. 



DWIGHIT ffiOOI^E, 



BILLIARD AND POOL 



Fj^PLIjOPL, 



3 'Phwni^ Row (Upstairs J, 
AMHERST, MASS, 



assachusetts Agricultural College, 





• 


" 


1 






-■ ":"':l^,^,!;g!|«S^^^^ 




.^^JB^Sj^iS^- 


1 






^^_^ 

"M,!^^^ 


.-^ 


i 


1^ -k^jij' 


eI 




HiHH 


t/~-, F-** — ^ — ■JL—^aWg*:^"^ 


1 


ii^M 



A.iXiliLor-«»t9 ]VIa^«»«s. 




^ 



<^ ?V- /jyi^i^^^^t^' 







VOL. I. 



AMHERST, MASS., MAY 13, 1891. 



NO. 15. 



k ilOREHOUSE, 
sDRlMTEiRS,* 

AMHERST, - - MASS. 

Mass, Ag[|icoltui]al College, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHERST, MASS. 

We would inform the friends of the college, 
and the public generally, that we are prepared 
to supply 

FRUIT AND OHNAMENTAL TREES AND 

.SHRUBS, SMALL ERUITS AND 

PLANTS, 

true to name, also 

CUT FLOWERS AN« DESIGNS, 

all at the lowest price. 

For Trees, Plants, Shrul)s, Flowers and Small 

Fruits, address, 

Prof, S, T. Maynard, 

AMHERST. MASS 

- THE AMHERST 

JgHi%. 

FURNITURE >ND CARPET STORE, 



<S|#^" 



A complete line of goods suited to the students' 
wants. 



BEDSTEADS, MATTRESSES, PILLOWS, 



S^ rUDY DESKS AND CHAIRS , 
LOU NGES 

AVINDOW SHADES, DRAPERIES, 

CARPETS, RUGS, ETC., ETC. 



C, H, SANDERSON k CO. 



CASH DEALERS IM 



Pip gLOTHII^g, 

Hats, Caps, Umbrellas, and Gents' 
Furnishing Goods. 



CASH ROW, 



AMHERST. 



S/NDEi|SGH k 1mm{}\ 



CASH DEALERS IN 



Dry and Fancy Goods, 

HOSIERY, RIBBONS, [AND SMALL 
WARES OF ALL KINDS. 

AMHEKST, MASS. 



BOOTS^'SHOES 

FOR EVERYBODY. 



tit tfoods Sfrieffi/ Cash and (it Lotvest Pvices. 



hi D. MAIiSH, 



10 I'flGSNIX ItOW, 



AMirKUST, MA.SS. 



A FIKE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, 
BALS. AND CONGRESS, 

A FULL I.INH OF 

liXJBBEE, G-OOIDS, 

l'()l)T-BAT,L SHOES AT LOWEST GASH PRICES. 

Repairing Done Promptly. 

T. W. SLOAN, 

3 PJKENIX MOW. 



S, J, SULLIVAN. 

j:)EALEK IN 

Second-Hand Clothes 

AND 

■ FURNITURE. 

I^Ordevs promiitly ,n,tt('ndiMl to.„^ 
1'. O. Box, 319 AMHERST, MASS. 



WHERE DO YOU BUY m\ 

Meerschaum Pipes? 
French Briar Pipes? 
Choice Tobacco? 
Sponges? 
Soap? 

Hair Brushes from 25 cts. up? 
Comljs from 5 cts. up? 
Choice New Yoric Confectionery? 
Sh.aving ilnus? 
Shaving Soap? 
Lather Brushes? 

Cigarettes, fresh every two weeks? 
The Best Soda in Ameiica? 
The Best Bay Rum? 
Imported Perfumes? 
Prescriptions prepared by licensed pharmacists? 
Imported Domestic Tooth Brushes? 

If you have not obtained these necessaries at 
DEUEL'S DRUd STORE, you have begun 
wrong. Deuel's is the leading Drug Store in 
Western Mass., and keeps the largest assort- 
ment of goods at bottom prices. 



DEIL'S D1& STOR 

Aoilierst House Block, Amlierst, lass. 



HENilY ADAMS, 

PHARMACIST, 

NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, ■ - AMHERST, MASS. 

Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORT- 
ED AND DOMESTIC CIGARS, 
CIGARETTES, ETC., 
MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, 
FISHING TACKLE AND SPORTING GOODS, 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, and Spurting 
and Springfield Rifles. 

Sunday and night calls responded to at resi- 
douce, first door west of Wood's Hotel. 



(brugs, Medicines, 

TOILET ARTICLES, ^ 
CONFECTIONERY, CIGARS, CIGARETTES 
AND SMOKERS' GOODS. 



mrSICJANti' PMICSCBlrTIOKS CAMJE- 

FtTi^T/r coMPOvifnisD, 

V, jnUENlX ROW. 

Order j'our COi^lL here. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



VOL. I. 



AMHERST, MASS., MAY 13, 1891. 



No. 15 



THE MOUNTAINS. 
Behold the grand old mountains, 
Like sentinels they stand, 
To guard the peaceful valley 
From foes on either hand. 
With snow crowued pealis uplifted 
Toward Heaven's eternal blue 
They stand lilse giant watchmen, 
Faithful, and firm, and true. 

Beneath the mountain's shadow 
The river lies at rest, 
Reflecting lilie a mirror 
Each battered roclvy crest. 
Though tempests wild may gather 
Above the clouds they rise 
And lift their towering heads aloft 
To meet the angry sliies. 

For ages past, the mountains 
Have guarded all beneath, 
Oft decked in robes of ermine. 
Or with the victor's wreath. 
Where once the Indian wandered 
And wild beasts sought their prey 
We hear the hum of the work shops 
In thriving towns to-day. 

But still unchanged, the mountains 

In silent grandeur rise 

And lift their towering heads aloft 

Unheeding to the skies ; 

Fit emblems of the majesty 

Of Him who reigns above, 

Of everlasting watchfulness 

And everlasting love. 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY. 

The existence of Cornell University is 
due to the bounty given by the United 
States, and tlie financial and personal aid 
of Ezra Cornell. The Act of Congress 
granting public lands to the several states, 
for the establishment and support of col- 
leges of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts 
gave the state of New York about 990,000 
acres. 

On the 27th of April, 1865, the Legisla- 
ture incorporated Cornell University and 
gave to it the income arising from the sale 
of these lands. An important condition, 
however, was that Ezra Cornell should give 
the University $500,000 and that instruc- 
tion be given in Agriculture, Mechanical 
Arts and Military Science. In addition to 
this gift he donated to the institution an 
additional two hundred acres of land, and 
buildings thereon, for agricultural purposes. 

The University is situated upon a hillside 
near Cayuga Lake Valley in New York 



State. It is several hundred feet above the 
lake level, and commands a view of the 
lake for miles, which with the beautiful 
scener}' of the two large ravines surround- 
ing the grounds makes it a most desirable 
place for the students and college. The 
grounds comprise about two hundred and 
seventy acres of beautiful teritory, laid 
out in broad, shady avenues, lined with the 
greatest variety of growtlis, illustrating 
botanj', horticulture and arborculture, as 
well as furnishing beauty and grandeur to 
the country. 

Scattered among this luxuriance are 
about thirty dwellings for the use of the 
faculty, as well as the scores of buildings 
ased in tiie instruction and accommodation 
of the students. There are also at least a 
dozen museums, and as many halls and 
laboratories, each devoted to a special 
branch of science, a few large libraries for 
students' use and the University farm and 
gardens which are beyond description. 

The college is controlled by twenty-three 
trustees, one of whom is the oldest male 
lineal descendent of the founder, also 
the principal members of the faculty, sev- 
eral state officers and the members elected 
b\' the state Legislative bodies. 

Being a co-educational institution, women 
are admitted upon the same terms and con- 
ditions as men, but are furnished an en- 
tirely different course of study, and sup- 
plied with a separate habitation called 
Sage Collese. 

The Physical training of the students is 
cared for by a professor of Physical Cul- 
ture, and by aid of their first class gymna- 
sium, many great athletes are produced. 
Although not high in college sports, it 
holds its own with other institutions of its 
size. It is through rowing that it has its 
greatest hold upon the athletic world, as it 
is far superior in this sport to any other 
college in the United States, and so much 
so that other colleges dare not compete 
with it. Athletics are controlled by an 
Association composed of trustees, faculty, 
alumni, and students through whom there 
has recently been purchased a fine athletic 
field of about nine acres, and a sufficient 
sum of money donated for its equipment 
and support. 

The University is free from any distinc- 
tion in religious belief, and consequently 



the religious exercises are such as suit all 
denominations. Its Christian societies are 
numerous, and are supported by over one- 
half the students, although each religious 
denomination has its own student club, for 
Christian work. 

Instruction is given m all the useful 
sciences of the day and a thorough educa- 
tion can be obtained in each. Connected 
with it are the schools of Law and 
Pharmacy. 

There are at present nearly 1500 stu- 
dents of both sexes in attendance, and the 
number is growing rapidly from year to 
year, making it one of the finest institu- 
tions of its kind in America. 

T. F. K. 



THE INFLUENCE OF OUR FLAG. 

It IS a growing custom to have the 
United States flag floating over the many 
school-houses and institutions of learning 
in our land. This is a custom which might 
well be increased and maintained, for it 
educates loyalty and patriotism not by 
books but by the silent and ever stimulating 
influence of the floating stars and stripes. 

A flag, no matter where seen, kindles in 
the breast a glow of patriotism and a 
thrilling love of country, which is the best 
safeguard for any nation. 

Both old and young, alike, are made to 
rejoice at the sight of their country's colors. 
Without love of country, without loyalty 
and patriotism, there is no country, and 
nothing will kindle and increase these 
virtues as the sight of one's own flag, as it 
were, floating freely on the air. 

In this college it is certain that it would 
require many times our number to take 
down the United States flag, when it is up, 
and in its place put up the flag of some 
other country. 

It is indeed a most encouraging sign that 
our country's flag is waving over so many 
of our schools and colleges ; it means a 
glorious country in the future, even more 
glorious than it has been in the past. 

Now, considering the influence of flags 
would it not be a good idea to have our 
own college flag floating in its proper place? 
not but what the students of this college 
are all loyal, but I think if we could see 
our nation's flag floating above us as we go 
about our duties or are enjoying our sports 



114 



AGGIE LIFE. 



we would not onl}- realize more full.y the 
many privileges wliicli this country affords 
us, but we would put more heart into our 
drilling, knowing that we are here prepar- 
ing to protect that flag if it should ever be 
in danger. H. Gr. S. 



MY LAST DANCE. 

"Are you going down to the dance to-night? 

I tliink you had better come. 
It's a lovely eve and the stars are bright 

At the hall there'll be lots of f uu." 

"To tell the truth, I am awfully tired 
And to-morrow's lessons are long. 

If I don't keep up, I'll surely get fired 
And that, you know, is wrong." 

So alone I went to Masonic hall 

Oh ! that nice and cosy place, 
'Tis there I've attended many a ball 

And seen many a beautiful face. 

Then, as I climbed the worn-out steps, 
My ears caught echoes of the violin 

And soon some pleasant people met, 
Who kindly invited me in. 

Of course, I quickly did accept 

This courteous invitation kind. 
But I did not quite expect 

So many pretty girls to find. 

I was introduced to a lovely girl. 

Her name I do not dare repeat. 
Her face and hands were white as pearl. 

And those rosy lips, oh ! how sweet. 

The tirst we danced was the polka glide, 
The next, I believe, was the lancers 

And never before did I stand beside 
So many graceful dancers. 

Soon a drink of water we decided to get. 
So quickly across the entry we went. 

If any one asked me, I'd be willing to bet, 
An hour in the alcove we quietly spent. 

What I did at that time I liate to relate, 
I'm so bashful, I don't like to tell. 

However, keep quiet, and I'll try to state 
Only a part which I recollect well. 

She raised to me her blushing face 
I bent and kissed her on the cheek, 

(The memory of that time and place 
Shall live with me for many a week.) 

She kissed me once and once again, 

Ah! can I ever — ever forget 
The things that happened there and then — 

But no — that scene is with me yet. 



COLLEGE EXPRESSIONS. 
Has it ever occurred to the student that 
wherever he may go he will always be 
recognized as a college student? Not so 
much, perhaps, from the culture which a 
college education is supposed to give a man 
as by the expressions and by-words which 
he inadvertently lets fall. Every college 
has its distinctive expression, and one well 



posted in such matters can tell in a moment 
from what institution a man hails. Oue 
college has its particular form of gentle- 
manly "cussing", another has its special 
word to designate some familiar object, and 
still another is distinct from all others in 
the fact of using some expression of which 
the original significauce may be entirely 
lost. At Amherst Ctillege, as long ago as 
Henry Ward Beecher was a student, an 
expression originated which, till within a 
few years was commonly used. Young 
Beecher used to practice on the fiddle, and 
at the end of every strain, would turn to his 
chum with "How's that, Eli?" and only 
the other day, that expression was heard 
from an Amherst student by the writer, 
although it is over fifty years since the 
graduation of Beecher. 

Here at Aggie, we have very few such 
phrases, but occasionally a fellow breaks 
out with, "Oh! how about that?" or 
"Wall! what are you going to do about 
this?" 

We have our " bolts " which in other 
colleges are called " runs," " slides," 
" freezes," etc., we have our pet names 
for certain of our loved professors, and 
these are characteristic enough of the col- 
lege, to make one Aggie known to another 
wherever they may meet. Under this head 
might conae the matter of college songs. 
Aggie is woefully deficient in this respect, 
we have only one, " North Amherst," and 
that is a class song rather than a college 
song. Is there not poetic ability enough 
in college to write the words and adapt them 
to some of the familiar tunes so that we 
can sit around the steps on the warm spring 
evenings and ring the praise of Aggie with 
our own songs and not have to borrow 
words from the song books of other insti- 
tutions? Wake up, boys, and give us some 
good rousing Aggie songs, and when once 
we have the words, do not be afraid but 
that the boys will take hold, and make old 
Aggie's praises ring, with hearty voices. 

E. C. H. 



THE EDUCATION FOR THE 
FARMER. 

About the first question which a farmer 
asks when he thinks of sending his son to 
the M. A. C. is, what good does it do for 
a farmer to obtain so much book learning? 
Would it not be better for him to get a 
more practical education on the farm of 
some good farmer? From us who are here 
or have been here the answer comes or, at 
least, should come, No. The young men 



who come here are mostly from the farm, 
and have already had a great deal of prac- 
tical work. What they now need is a 
greater knowledge of the scieuce of agri- 
culture, so as to broaden their iutellectual 
powers and make them better fitted to 
enjoy life. The young men who come 
here, come at an age when their characters 
are being made and strengthened. Per- 
haps some may say that this is a disadvan- 
tage, because the young men may be led 
into temptation more easilj', whereas if 
they stayed at home until they were older, 
they would not fall into these temptations. 
In some cases this is true, but in the 
majority of instances the college boy feels 
the responsibility that is placed upon him, 
and realizes that he must take care of 
himself and no longer lean upon others. 
In this way he gains self-reliance, . his 
character is strengthened and he is able in 
later life to cope more successfully in the 
battles which are sure to come. The 
knowledge gained at college cannot be 
estimated in dollars and cents, it comes 
into play every day of our lives and as we 
associate with people who have not had 
the advantages which we have, the knowl- 
edge obtained by us is spread abroad 
throughout the whole country, and even 
departs from our shores and goes into 
foreign lands, there to work its subtle, yet 
powerful influence, and help to raise 
humanity to a higher sphere of action. 
When a young man leaves the common 
schools he has been taught things which 
are learned wholly from books. He needs 
an education that will teach him to look 
into Nature and see and understand her 
wonderful works, and this is what he gets 
here. From studying Nature, he is led 
into a closer communion with Nature's 
God. Bryant very beautifully expresses 
our love of Nature in the following lines : 
"To him who in the love of Nature holds 
Communion with her visible forms, she speaks 
A various language ; for his gayer hours 
She has a voice of gladness, and a smile 
And eloquence of beauty, and she glides 
Into his darker musings, with a mild 
And healing sympathy, that steals away 
Their sharpness, e're he is aware." 

If the M. A. C. did nothing but instill 
this love for Nature into the heart of every 
one of its pupils, it would do something 
which would lift humanity to a much higher 
level. 

If anyone thinks for a moment that a 
college education is of no value to the 
farmer, let him look at the list of our 
alumni and see the positions which our 
graduates have been able to take. Then 



AGGIE LIFE. 



"5 



on tlie other baud, look at those who 
thought that a college education was of no 
value and unnecessary, and the decision 
will be made at once that the college 
educated men are capable of taking the 
highest positions. 

J. E. G. 



TWO VERSIONS. 

THE STUDENT. 

How sad are the trials of a young student's life, 
'Tis just steady study throughout the loug 
day. 

I would like much to get me a home and a wife, 
And a place as an editor, drawing big pay. 

I'm sure 'twould be fun just to sit still aud write, 
Scribbling this thing and that for the people 
to read, 
What a snap I should have from morning till 
uight, 
And earn as an editor all things I should 
need. 

THE EDITOR. 

Oh, dear ! with this worry and fret I am wild ! 

Oh, would I were living again as a child ; 
Or turning backward a space, be a student once 
more. 

Enjoying wild frolics and lessons of yore. 

To be sure the Profs would oft threaten, I 
know. 
To eliminate some from the earth here below 
When perchance during lessons a match hap- 
pened to snap, 
Or some youthful disciple was caught in a nap. 

But still, spite of all, there is much to enjoy. 
And I know I should like to be once more a 
boy. 

Drop this hurry and fret of an editor's life. 
And, entering college, forget worry and wife. 

MORAL. 

Whatever employment to you may be given 

Whether student or editor, no matter what, 
Just do you best always and try to improve, 
And ne'er waste your time wishing for what 
you have not. 

E. M. 



CHOOSING AN OCCUPATION. 

The majority of young men when they 
first enter college do not know what their 
life work is going to be, and it is a hard 
problem for them to solve. Some of them 
may perhaps have rich parents and do not 
need to think how they are going to earn 
their daily bread later on, but even those 
ought to have some preference among the 
different life works and decide what it shall 
be. 

"What are you going to do when you 
leave college?" is a question which you 
have probablj' heard time and again, asked 
by one student of another, and the answer 
generally is, "I do not know." 



Now, how shall we find out what occu- 
pation we shall like the best and for which 
we are best fitted ? A man may come here 
with the idea that he will like farming, but 
after he has been in college a short time, 
he finds that he likes chemistry better than 
agriculture. If this be the case he should 
settle right down to work and throughout 
his college course should make the most of 
the chemistry that he gets here, so that he 
can go into some experiment station when 
he graduates, and work up to be a first-class 
chemist. 

Again, if electives were in the curricu- 
lum and a person should enter college, he 
might choose such studies as would be the 
easiest to him, and on which he would not 
have to spend much study ; but for all his 
easy study that man will not be satisfied 
with his college work in later years, and he 
will wish that he had taken such studies as 
would have been a benefit to him. 

One does not know what occupation he 
is best suited for until he has had some 
experience in different lines of work, but 
after finding one for which he thinks him-' 
self well fitted, he should study on it and 
avail himself of all the chances which ofl'er 
themselves to him, and by which he can 
better fit himself for that occupation. 

A student at this college can find a great 
deal in the college library on almost any 
pursuit or occupation and many facts may 
be found there which would be of great 
help to him in his course of study. "But 
we do not want all theoretical knowledge," 
some one might say, and this is undoubt- 
edly true ; but look ahead a little further, 
after you have obtained theoretical knowl- 
edge, then go and put your theories into 
practice and learn by experience. 

The number of hours of study has been 
shortened somewhat, in order to give the 
students more time to read, aud this time 
should be spent in reading something that 
will be of some worth to them later on, 

O 

and what will be of more worth to them 
than to get hints on their future work. 

Do not be a Jack of All Trades and not 
have any particular branch well developed, 
but pick out some single branch, develop 
it and win your place in the world. Of 
course a person can not make up his mind 
in a minute what his trade shall be, and it 
would not be advisable to do so. For, if 
after he has chosen a certain branch and 
studied on it, he finds that it is not the one 
for which he is best fitted, his studying 
will have been a waste of time, and he will 
have to spend a number of years more per- 



haps, in fitting himself for the branch 
which he ought to have chosen first. 

So don't be too hasty in choosing but 
commence to think about it while you are 
young, and then you will be better pre- 
pared to answer the question when the 
time comes for you to do so. 

H. B. E. 



SONG OF THE BUGGERS. 

DEDICATED TO THE GYPSY MOTH COMMISSION. 

To be sung to the tune " We are all Noddin'. 

We are all frightened, see us tremble. 

We are all frightened, scared almost to death. 

The Gypsy moth has come, and we fear he's 

come to stay, 
Alas ! aud alas ! and alas ! alack a day ! 
We are all frightened, shake, sliake, tremble. 
We are all frightened in the old Bay State. 

A year ago they tried to kill him, 

But he wouldn't die in spite of all their pains, 

They gave him Paris green, the strongest ever 

seen, 
But still he's alive to trouble us I ween, 
So we're all frightened, shake, shake, tremble, 
We are all frightened, scared almost to death. 

We are all marching, left, right, forward, 

We are all marching to light the Gypsy moth. 

We'll shoot him witli a gun, and that you know 

is fun, 
But when the farmer comes we'll scramble 

down and run, 
For we're an army straight from Aggie, 
And they pay us well to light the Gypsy moth. 

We have only just begun the battle. 

But we'll bravely fight the fierce and bloody foe. 

We'll eat the farmer's fruit, and his garden sass 

to boot, 
Aud when we get a chance at the Gypsy moth 

we'll shoot, 
Aud we'll all stay as long as they will pay us, 
And we'll bravely fight the fearful Gypsy moth. 



ALUMNI NOTES. 
Ur. Austin Peters, '81, recently veteri- 
narian to the Massachusetts Society for 
Promoting Agriculiure, may now be found 
at 35 Congress Street, Room 23, Boston. 

James T. Hutchings, '89, has severed his 
connection with the Germantown Electric 
Light Co., and is now working for the 
West End Electric Co., 31st Street and 
Girard Avenue, Philadelphia. 

Edwin W. Allen, '85, married Estelle 
Perkins at Amherst April 2nd, 1891. 

Asa F. Shiveriek, '82 married Ruth An- 
na Hatch at Woods HoU, 23d of April 
1891. 

Matthew Courtney a non graduate of 
1880 died at Brockton April 25, '91. 

CHANGE OF ADDRESS. 

William A. Macleod '76, Macleod Calver 
and Randall, Exchange Building, State 
street, Boston. 

Dr. Austin Peters '81, 35 Congress St., 
Room 23, Boston Mass. 



ii6 



AGGIE LIFE. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Published Fortniglitly by the Students of the 
Mass. Agricultural College. 



Terms $1,00 per year, in advance. Single copies, 10c. 



Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 



BO AMD OJF EVITOJtS: 

II. E. CRANE, '92, Editor-in-Chief, 
G. B. WILLAED, '92, Business Manager, 
G. E. TAYLOR, '92, R. H. SMITH, '92, 

G. F. CURLEY, '93, B. SEDGWICK, '93, 

C. F. WALKER, '21. 

Address all communications to the Business Manager. 



The Editors would be very glad if the 
alumni would notify them of any changes 
of location, occupation, or other items of 
interest, concerning themselves or other 
alumni, so that we ma}' make the Alumni 
Notes as complete as possible. 



Boys, wake up ! Those new hurdles, shot, 
hammer, vaulting pole, etc., for field day 
have been here now for some time, and as 
yet, only four or five men are using them 
regularly. Remember, field day is not far 
distant, and it must be made a success. 



The proverb, " Give one an inch and 
he'll take an ell," is very applicable to a 
number of our students in the advantage 
they take of their library facilities. The 
library is for the use of every student, one 
as well as another. Because books are 
allowed to be drawn out for an indefinite 
time, it is not ineant that a student can 
take out a large number of books at the 
beginning of the term and keep them uutil 
required to bring them in. Some, how- 
ever, apparently think that the library 
exists for their own especial benefit, and, 
accordingly, when they have used a book 
all they wish, it is placed upon the book- 
case, where it remains unmolested, until 
the close of the term. Such a ^jractice is 
an injustice to the students at large, as 
well as to all patrons of our library. When 
a student has finished using library books, 
let him return them and thus give his 
fellows the privilege of consulting the 
same books, rather than depriving them of 
it. None of us would have our library 
privileges restricted, but such can only be 
the case if students persist in abusing 
them. 



As the end of the year approaches, and 
reforms for the coming year are beginning 



to take their places in the minds of the 
students, a reform suggests itself, which 
although it may seem trivial, is really of 
importance. The ordinary student body is 
a fairly developed hook exchange. The 
work that one man needs and has not, is 
found ou the shelf of a classmate or friend. 
Nothing exceeds the freedom of the bor- 
rower in asking for the loan, except per- 
haps, the freedom of the lender in granting 
it. This is well. Men may be, in this 
way, of the greatest help one to another. 
But this is not all. Weeks pass by and 
the lender forgets the circuiristance ; and 
when he needs his book, is ignorant of its 
whereabouts, and helpless in its recovery. 
I have in mind a friend who thus lent a 
book, valuable in itself, but more so 
because a present from Hon. Wm. E. 
Gladstone, and so impossible to replace, 
and in the manner mentioned above it was 
borrowed and never returned. We may 
not have books of such value as that one, 
but all of us have suffered to a more or 
less extent from this slackness among our 
fellow students. Let every one look over 
his library, and selecting such books as 
have been borrowed, return them to the 
owner. For while this matter is, to a cer- 
tain extent, a point of honor, further than 
this it is a matter of common honest}-. 
The saying of the wise man is too often 
reversed aud the lender is the servant to 
the borrower. 



almost as soon as the pond froze over. It 
should now be suflSciently evident that a 
stone dam is necessary to secure good 
results. Of course, such a construction 
would require money, but once completed 
the expanse would end, and satisfaction 
afforded the eye alone would pay la,rge 
dividends. 



A SHORT time ago nimors were current 
among the students, that before Com- 
mencement a permanent stone dam was lo 
be put in at the point where the stream 
crosses Botanic path. Whether or not 
there was any truth in the statement is 
unknown. The scheme has been so much 
talked of in the last two years, aud so 
little done to effect any such an end, that 
there is still room for considerable uncer- 
tainty. The grounds about the college 
buildings are very pretty, aud are con- 
stantly kept in good order. But what an 
addition an expanse of water would be in 
beautifying the scenery ! Those who went 
to Tufts college May 2, will certainly agree 
that the reservoir situated on the summit 
of college hill is a great attraction to the 
eye. Such a pond would be even more so 
here, situated in a valley where it could 
not fail to be seen, and it certainly would 
be enjoyed by all both summer and winter. 
Two attempts have been made to build a 
temporary dam in the winter to accommo- 
date skaters in leisure hours. These have 
been quite unsuccessful, breaking away 



In the columns of some of our exchanges, 
we find space reserved for alumni contribu- 
tions, and some, even, have an alumni 
editor, to whom all material from alumni 
is sent, and who arranges one or two pages 
of interesting matter for each issue. In 
these pages we find many very interesting 
arti(-les upon foreign travel, experiences in 
our owu country, and also articles i>pon 
topics of prime importance to the colleges 
themselves of which those papers are the 
organs. The alumni, as a body of men, 
having been through the course which their 
college affords ; having gone out into the 
world to fight life's battles, are the most 
competent judges, as to whether the course 
furnishes cogent weapons for this great 
conquest, upon the result of which each 
man's happiness depends. Having this 
knowledge, they possess means by the 
proper use of whicli they can greatly 
benefit their ^Zma Mater. Now, this being 
the case should not every loyal alumnus 
strive to employ these means to the best of 
his ability? How? By imparting to the 
students, and to those over them, this 
knowledge as to the efHcacj- of the course 
for the end in view, and by making judi- 
cious suggestions for improvement either 
in the curriculum or management. The 
college paper is the medium through 
which these suggestions can be made. 
To come to the case in hand. What 
our alumui want is a realizing sense 
of their duty toward the college. Occa- 
sionally we have an article contributed 
by an alumnus, for which we are duly 
grateful, but why should we not have two 
or three columns by the alumni each issue? 
Perhaps it would not be well just at present 
to have an alumni editor, but we earnestly 
hope that they will avail themselves of the 
opportunity afforded, to aid, not only the 
college, but the college paper as well. 



GLEANINGS. 

— The Juniors and Sophomores play 
to-day. 

—J. H. Kellogg, formerly of '93, has 
entered '94. 

— The cannon are again to be seen on 
the campus. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



117 



—J. B. Hull, '91, spent the Sabbath at 
Springfield. 

— The Juniors are now taking Ornamen- 
tal Gardening. 

— W. H. Ranuey spent Sunday at his 
home in Ashfield. 

— E. T. Clark, '92, spent Sunday at his 
home in Granby. 

— The Juniors are having weekly debates 
under Prof. Mills. 

— The Seniors have finished their course 
in Military Science. 

— E. J. Walkei had friends at the col- 
lege last Thursday. 

— President Goodell was obliged to be 
away May 6 and 7. 

— Messrs. Shores and Hull have each 
purchased safeties. 

— The Junior class had an examination 
in Forestry last Friday. 

— Are we to have artillery and mortar 
drills, Commencement? 

— Our band is improving and is certainly 
an honor to our institution. 

— The fountain at the Botanic has been 
repaired and is now running. 

— May 1, the Sophomores were defeated 
by the Seniors. Score 20 to 8. 

— Considerable ice formed around the 
fountain on the night of May 4th. 

— F. L. Arnold, '91, will enter the es- 
iperiment station after graduating. 

— Rev. Mr. Spencer, of Norwell, Mass, 
will occupy the pulpit next Sunday. 

— Our base-ball team had a group pic- 
ture taken at Hartford last Saturday. 

— Friday, May 22, the Committees from 
the Legislature will inspect the college. 

— The band now plays at dress parades. 
It is a great addition to the ceremonies. 

— F. S. Hoyt and B. Sedgwick, both of 
'93, spent Saturday in Palmer surveying. 

— We don't propose to be disturbed by 
a lawn mower at 5 o'clock every morning. 

■ — April 29, the Freshmen defeated the 
Juniors in the class series. Score 14 to 9. 

— The slaters have been busy on the 
roofs of the dormitories the last few days. 

—The Amherst Freshmen were beaten 
by Williston last Saturdaj* by a score of 26 
to 6. 

— We play Wesleyan on our own grounds 
next Saturday and a good game may be 
expected. 

— The cadets who had unexcused ab- 
sences were obliged to drill last Saturday 
morning. 



— Some new apparatus has been pur- 
chased by the Athletic Association for use 
on field day. 

— H. M. Howard, '91, and F. A. Smith, 
'93, visited Hoosac tunnel and Mt. Grey- 
lock last Saluiday. 

— Alumni and members of the Gypsy 
Moth Commission gave the nine a hearty 
welcome at College Hill. 

— It is thought that the buds of our 
peach and plum trees were uninjured by 
the recent cold weather. 

— The Address before the Y. M. C. A. 
Commencement will be given by Rev. John 
Bascom, D. D., LL. D. 

— Why has the flag staff not ben raised? 
During pleasant weather the flag should be 
displayed every drill day. 

— Many of our students witnessed the 
game between Amherst and Williams at 
Blake field last Wednesday. 

— Sunday, May 10, Dr. AValker ex- 
changed with Rev. H. W. Lathe of the 
First Church of Northampton. 

— The Juniors took a final examination 
in physics last Thursday. Hereafter that 
hour will be devoted to entomology. 

— May 6, the Freshmen succeed in beat- 
ing the Seniors in a seven inning game. 
Score 9 to 8. Two Freshmen have a bon- 
fire in the evening. 

— The hearing on the question between 
this college and Institute of Technology 
was continued from last week to Tuesday, 
May 12th at 9.00 a. m. 

— We have received an album of Agri- 
cultural Graphics from the Secretary of 
Agriculture showing the value per acre of 
crops of the United States. 

— The; Sophomores and Freshmen will 
have no more rhetoricals this term, thus 
allowing Prof. Mills to give more of his 
time to commencement speakers. 

— The following men from the Freshmen 
class have been chosen to compete for the 
Kendall prize : C. L. Brown, A. C. Cur- 
tis, J. E. Gifford and F. I. Parker. 

— The Wesleyaus are very confident of 
success next Saturday, and every student 
should make it a point to be on hand and 
give a hearty cheer for the home team. 

— May 6, a party of ladies and gentle- 
men from Virginia visited the college. 
They were under the guidance of Profes- 
sors Brooks, Maynard and Warner, and 
inspected each department as thoroughly 
as time permitted. 



— The members of the nine were hospit- 
ably entertained after the game by F. H. 
Henderson '93, at his home in Maiden. 
All spent a very enjoyable evening with 
him. 

— At a meeting of the Y. M. C. A., 
held May 7, the following oflBcers were 
elected for the coming year: President, E. 
T. Clark '92 ; vice-president, H. E. Crane, 
'92 ; corresponding secretary, L. W. 
Smith '93 ; recording secretary, C. H. Bar- 
ton, '94 ; treasurer, F. S. Hoyt, '93. 

— Since the insertion of an editorial in 
this issue we have learned that the Athletic 
Association will hold no field day this 
spring, partly on account of the slowness 
of the carpenters in constructing the hur- 
dles, etc., but more directly on account of 
the discouraging lack of interest shown by 
the college at large. 

— A pamphlet has been compiled under 
the direction of the secretary of the State 
Board of Agriculture, by F. H. Fowler B. 
Sc. entitled, "Insecticides and their 
Application," for the information and use 
of the agriculturists and fruit growers of 
the commonwealth. It contains manv 
good practical common sense articles and 
should be read by every one interested in 
fruit growing. 

— At the regular quarterly meeting of the 
Board of Control of the State Experiment 
Station, held at the Station, April 14, the 
following matters of business were trans- 
acted : Mr. Weutzeli was re-engaged as 
farmer of the Station ; the quarterly report 
of the director was accepted ; and it was 
voted that $1,600 of the fund arising from 
the analysis of fertilizers be held in reserve 
for the ultimate purpose of building a 
storehouse for the station. 

— At a special meeting of the State 
Board of Agriculture held at Boston, April 
28, Secretary Wm. R. Sessions, Prof. N. 
S. Shaler and Representative F. H. Apple- 
ton were appointed as a committee to have 
charge o& the work of exterminating the 
Gypsy Moth. It was voted to ask the 
Legislature for an additional appropria- 
tion of $50,000 to carry on the work until 
next February. It was decided that the 
matter of abandoned farms be referred to 
the Executive Committee and Secretary 
with power to carry out the provisions of 
the act. 

— The following men from the Senior 
class have been appointed to speak com- 
mencement : F. L. Arnold, Belchertown, 
The Farmer and His Country ; W. A. 
Brown, Feeding Hills, The Power of 



ii8 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Thought; A. G. Eames, North Wilming- 
ton, Nature and the Nation ; H. J. Field, 
Leverett, What Shall WeDo?;0. V. B. 
Lage, Juiz de Fota, Minas, Gevaes, Brazil, 
Whiit will be the effect of Reciprocity be- 
tween Brazil and the United States?; H, 
N. Legate, Sunderland, The Farmer as a 
Citizen ; W. C. Paige, Amherst, The Danger 
of Eapid Material Progress of the United 
States. H. N. Legate will represent the 
college at Boston University in June. 



PRAYER MEETING TOPICS. 
May 14tli— Sons of God. Gal. 4:1-7: 

Romans 8:14, 16, 17. E. H. 

Alderman. 
May 17th — Pleading for Others. 

18 :23-33. F. J. Parker. 



Gen. 



May 21st — Warnings of the Bible. 

10 :1-12. H. D. Clark. 
May 24th — Salvation a free Gift. 

3 :l-22. E. T. Clark. 



1 Cor. 



John 



BASE-BALL. 



Tufts, 14 ; Aggie, 4. 
Tufts won the game May 2 in the first 
inning, by heavy batting and fine base 
running. It was the same old story. Our 
team didn't settle down to work the first 
few innings ; however it was the first time 
they played off the home grounds this sea- 
son, and best results could not be expect- 
ed. For Tults, Hayes played finely at 
short and Johnston made several fine 
catches in the out field. The features of 
the game for Aggie were Ruggles' good 
work at first, and the heavy batting of 
Curley. The score : — 



A E 
4 

4 
3 
4 
4 
4 



1 B 



1 


1 

o 



1 



T E 


PO 


A 


E 


1 


3 


1 


3 





1 


i) 


1 


1 


3 


3 


1 





1 


(1 


1 


2 


13 


1 


1 


3 


o 











4 


2 


1 


U 





1 





1 


1 


2 






■r B p o 





Wniaril, cf, 
Crane, p, 
Paige, (Capt.) c, 
Parker, rf, 
Riiggles, lb, 
Curley, If, 
Hull, 3b, 
Fletcher, ss, 
Howard, 2b, 

Total, 



Foss, (Capt.) 2b, 
Hyler, 3b, 
Maitiu, li>, 
Hayes, ss, 
Johnstoii, If, 
McKeuzie, p, 
HoUiBter, rf, 
Simontls, c, 
Fairley, cf, 

Total, 43 14 10 10 27 23 2 

Innings, 123456789 
Tufts, 7 14 10 1 0—14 

M. A. C, 1 3 0—4 
Base on balls— Aggie 1, Tufts 5. Struck out— Crane 
3, McKenzie 2, Hyler 1. Two-base hits— Euggles, Cur- 
ley. Umpires— Lenhert, M. A. C, '93. 

Trinity, 6; Aggie, 1. 

Aggie was beaten at Hartford Saturday 

by the Trinity college nine. The game 

was called at 3. SO with Trinity at the bat. 

At the end of the third inning, the score 



33 

A E 
4 
5 
5 
5 
5 
4 
5 
5 
5 



1 E 


1 

2 

3 
1 
2 
1 





13 
3 
3 
I 

6 
1 



was 2 to 1 in favor of Trinity. Aggie tried 
hard to tie the score at this point in the 
game but was unable to hit Hamlin. Trini- 
ty obtained 3 more runs in the fifth inning 
and 1 in the seventh. Both sides were un- 
able to score in the last two innings. The 
game was characterized by the battery 
work of Hamlin and Graves for Trinity 
and the batting of Paige for Aggie. 



WTiUard, cf , 
Crane, p, 
Paige. (Capt.) c, 
Parker, rf , 
Buggies, lb, 
Curley, If, 
Hull, 3b, 
Fletcher, ss, 
Howard, 2b, 



AB 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
3 
3 
2 
3 



lb 

1 
2 


1 






T B 

n 
1 

2 



1 







PO 

1 


4 

15 

1 

6 



Total, 


31 1 4 

TEraiTY. 


4 


27 


20 


7 




A B K IB 


TB 


P O 


A 


E 


Mallory, If, 


5 1 1 


I 











Paine, cf , 


3 2 


2 


(1 


1 





Dingwell, 2b, 


4 1 





6 


2 





Graves, (Capt.) c. 


4 1 2 


3 


8 


2 





Thurston, ss. 


4 





1 


5 


2 


Hill, 3b, 


4 12 


2 





1 


1 


Muzzy, rf. 


4 1 


1 











Hubbard, lb, 


4 1 1 


1 


12 


1 





Hamlin, p. 


4 1 1 


1 





s 






Total, 
Innings, 1 



10 
5 
3 




U 
6 



27 20 3 

7 8 9 

1 0—6 

0— I 



Trinity, 2 

Aggie", 1 

First base on called balls— Crane 1, Hamlin 1. Struck 
out — Crane 4, Hamlin 5. Two-base hit— Graves. 



Aggie '94, 14 ; Aggie '92, 9. 



AGGIE '92. 



Willard, c. 
Field, cf, 
Crane, lb, 
Fletcher, p, 
Lyman, rf, 
Emerson, ss, 
Rogers, 3b, 
Boynton, If, 
West, 2b, 

Totals, 



Parker, c. 
Barton, p, 
Dickinson, rf. 
Bobbins, 2b, 
Davis, lb, 
Park, ss, 
Sanford, If, 
Goessmann, 2b, 
Toole, cf, 

Total, 

Innings, 1 

Aggie '94, 3 

Aggie, '92, 



IB SB P O 



9 

13 


1 
1 

3 



13 27 14 11 



IE SB P O 



14 

3 4 

1 

2 1 



18 
5 





12 
6 





27 18 

7 i 

1 





10 
9 

9—14 
1— 9 



Two-base hits— Parker, Davis. Three-base hits— Par- 
ker, Field. Double play— Park. Base on baUs— '94 1, 
'92 9. Wild pitches— Barton, Fletcher. Left on bases— 
'94 3, '92 4. Struck out— Barton 5, Fletcher 8. Umpires- 
Hull and Paige. Scorer— Keith. 

Aggie '91, 20 ; Aggie '93, 8. 





AGGIE 


'91. 












A B K 


IE 


S E 


P o 


A 


E 


Hull, p. 


5 3 


2 


1 


2 


10 


1 


Paige, lb. 


,■) 3 


2 


2 


6 





3 


Euggles, c. 


5 4 





1 


10 


3 


2 


Legate, 2b, 


5 3 


3 


4 










Howard, cf. 


5 1 














1 


Carpenter, 3b, 


i 1 





1 


2 





1 


Magill, If, 


4 

















Horner, ss, 


4 2 


1 


2 


1 


1 


1 


Field, rf. 


4 3 


2 


3 





1 


1 


Total, 


20 
AGGIE 


10 
'93. 


14 


21 


17 


10 




A B K 


1 B 


S B 


P O 


A 


E 


How.ard, c, 


4 








7 


3 


2 


Curley, p, cf. 


4 1 





1 





6 





Bartlett, ss, 


4 3 


1 








1 


1 


Davis, lb, 


4 2 


1 





9 





1 


F. A. Smith, 3b, 


4 1 








1 





•2 


Perry, 2b, 


4 1 


3 


4 


1 


1 


3 


C. A. Smith, cf, p. 


4 







1 


2 





Staples, 11', 


4 


1 


1 


1 . 


1 


1 


Tinooo, rf , 


4 


1 


1 












Total, 



21 14 



10 




Business is business FBANK WOOD will get up 
Spreads foi the Boys this winter. Send your orders 
right along to get there first. 



BODY'S 

Go to BLODGETT & CLARK 
for CLOTHS or FURNISHING 
GOODS. 

They keep the best hne and use 
the students well. 

Take your laundry to them Mon- 
day or Wednesday morning and 
you will get good work. 

BLODSETT ^ gLfi^K 



JOHN MULLEN. 



-DEALER IN- 



MEATS and PROVISIONS, 

VEGETABLES OF ALL KINDS IN SEASON, 

FISH AND OYSTERSj FOREIGN 

AND DOMESTIC FRUITS, 

AND CANNED 

GOODS. 

Palmer's Block, Main Street. 



E. R. BENNETT, 
Jeweler, 

Optician, 

Watchmaker. 

FINE GOODS! LOW PRICES! 

GOOD WORK WARRANTED. 

First Door from Post Office. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



iig 



IF YOU WANT TO GET OYSTERS IN ANY 
STYLE GO TO 

E. B. ARNOLD'S 

0Y2TE]^ gftPE, 

Students are attended at short notice, 



Open all clays of the week until 12 o'clock. 
Sundays from 9 a. m. to 12-30 P. M., and from 
7 p. M. to 11 p. M. 

William's Block, Merchants' Row. 



The title page of this book was drawn and engi-aved by 

John S*"''^'S) 

6 Davis Street, BOSTON, MASS. 

The various publications of Bates, Bowdoin, Colby, 
Tufts, Mass. Agricultural College, Wellesly and Yale 
bave used his work. He will submit sketches and cari- 
catures for your approval. 



OFFICE OF 



EDWARD A. THOMAS, 

Fii|E j[^ Life Insurance pi^. 

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE AND TO LET. 



Office, Coohs Block, Amherst, Mass, 



GEO. GRAVES, 

DEALER IN 

Painters' Supplies 

Personal attention given to Frescoing, Dec- 
orating and Paper Hanging, and all 
Interior and Exterior 
House Painting. 

Pleasant St., near L. J. Spear's Shop. 



AMHERST COLLEGE 

CO-OPERATIVE STEi LAUNDRY 

and Carpet Renovaving Establlsliment. 



Aggie Agent, H. M. HOWARD, '91. 



Work taken Monday delivered Wednesday. 
" " Wednesday delivered Saturday. 

OFFICE AT BRINE'S. 

H. A. UTLEY, Manager. 



Innings, 123 456780 
Aggie '01, 3 2 1 S —10 

Aggie '93, 10 2 114 — S 

Two-base hits— Hull, Paige, Uuggles, Field, Carpen- 
ter, Davis 2. Three-base hit— Davis. Base on balls— 
'01 3, '93 6. Base on dead ball— '01 1, '03 3. Passed balls— 
'015, '93 3. Wild pitchs— Hulls, C. A. Smith 2. Struck 
out— By Hull 9, Smitli 2, Curley 6. Left on bases— '03 6. 
Umpires — Dickinson and Crane. Scorer — Keith. 

Aggie '94, 9; Aggie '91,8. 

AGGIE '01. 

AR R IBSBPO A E 

Hull, p, 4 2 2 2 17 

Paige, c, 4 2 12 5 5 

Ruggles, lb, 4 2 118 3 

Legate, 2b, 4 2 1 

Howard, of, 3 10 2 

Carpenter, 3b, 3 10 10 1 

Magill, If, 2 
Horner, ss, 3 12 1110 

Field, rf, 3 2 10 

Gay, If, 10 



Total, 




8 


8 


8 


18 


13 


7 




AGGIE 


'94. 












A B 


R 


1 B 


S E 


P 


A 


F, 


Parker, c, 


4 


2 


1 


1 


R 





1 


Barton, p. 


3 


1 


2 


2 





9 





Dickinson, rf. 


3 


1 


1 














Robbins, 2b, 


3 




















Davis, lb, 


3 


2 





1 











Park, ss, 


3 


1 


1 


1 








4 


Sanford, If, 


3 

















2 


Goessmann, 3b, 


3 


1 


1 


2 


4 





2 


Toole, of, 


3 


1 


1 





2 


1 






7 21 10 9 

6 7 8 9 

10 — 8 

— 9 



Total, 9 

Innings, 12 3 4 
Aggie '91, 2 110 
Aggie '04, 7 11 

Two-base hits — Rugles, Davis, Three-base hits — 
Paige, Robbins. Base on balls— 3 each. Base on dead 
ball— 1 each. Left on bases — '91 2, '94 1. Struck out— 
By Hull 3, Barton 5, Umpii-es- Lcnhert and F. A. Smith. 
Scorer— Keith. 



LAVOISIER. 

It is not neeeessary for us to loolv out 
side of our own national boundary for men 
who have reached eminence in the sciences, 
but sometimes it is well to obtain a Ijnowl- 
edge of what men have accomplished, in 
former times ia nations older than ours, 
not only for the historical interest of a 
science, but that we may obtain a Icnowl- 
edge of the men themselves. 

Especially is this true of Lavoisier ; in- 
deed the history of chemical science would 
be very incomplete, should the name of this 
illustrious philo.«pher be left out. 

We might say perhaps without over es- 
timation that Lavoisier was to the science 
of chemistry what Washington was to our 
country, not but that due credit should be 
given to such men as Block, Priestly, Cav- 
endisli and others, who made known many 
facts upon which the science of cliemistry 
is built, but making use of their results 
with those of his own Lavoisier did much 
to lay the foundation of modern chemistry. 

Lavoisier was born in the city of Paris 
in 1743, and was the son of a man possess- 
ing considerable wealth. He was well ed- 
ucated receiving a thorough mathematical 
and physical training, and early showed a 
taste for scientific investigation. We find 
him soon verifying statements made by 
those before him and in all of his research- 
es he shows himself to be a zealous student 
and a devout scientist. 



It was thought by many that water when 
heated was converted to earth, and it be- 
came an object of Lavoisier's earliest in- 
vestigations. To obtain the truth, he heated 
water in a close vessel over one hundred 
consecutive days finding the weight of the 
vessel to be the same at the end of the ex- 
periment, as at the beginning, which 
proved that no change of the kind had 
taken place. Such was his earnestness 
that he spared no pains in order to obtain 
the truth and the results indicate the ex- 
actness in his methods. It was the sys- 
tematic operations whieli he pursued, with 
his keen observation that gave him such 
success as a scientist. To relate in detail 
what he did for the science would not be 
an easy matter, but we may say, to him is 
due more than to any one else, the found- 
ing of chemistry as a scientific study. 

Many charge Lavoisier for taking honors 
upon himself for discoveries made by 
others. This may be true, but he made 
use of such discoveries, for the advance- 
ment of the science. Lavoisier appears 
not to have neglected social and political 
affairs, but his life as a scientist is best 
known, and interests us the most. In read- 
ing the life history of such scientists as 
Lavoisier, the student will find many desir- 
able qualities worthy of his consideration. 

F. J. S. 



COLLEGE NOTES. 

A mock town meeting was held by Am- 
herst students May 4. 

Mt. Holyoke college has started a new 
paper called the Pastel. 

The roof of the new gymnasium at Yale 
is to be entirely of glass. 

Ihe juniors of Ohio Wesleyan banquets 
the senior class every year. 

Seven of Princeton's '90 base-ball team 
are training for their old positions. 

Among Dartmouth's alumni are to be 
found thirty-seven college presidents. 

Union college has received gifts aggre- 
gating over $200,000 during the last six 
months. 

Foot-ball in any form has been strictly 
prohibited by the University of Heidelberg, 
Germany. 

The senior class of Wesleyan have voted 
to abolish class day exercises of commence- 
ment week. 

Brown has been presented with the gift 
of an astronomical observatoiy from Gov- 
ernor Ladd. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



The Italian government has ordered 
English to be added to all the courses of all 
the colleges. 

Bowdoin and Colby have founded a 
dual league. The title is the Maine Col- 
lege League. 

The average age of students entering 
college is seventeen. A century ago it 
was fourteen. 

The Ohio State University will hereafter 
receive from the state an annual appropri- 
ation of $100,000. 

The average Wellesley student is five 
feet two inches in height and weighs one 
hundred and nineteen pounds. 

The twenty-fifth anniversary of the 
founding of the Amherst Student was cele- 
brated by a breakfast May 6th. 

A base-ball nine composed of graduates 
of Yale, Harvard, Princeton, Columbia, 
and Michigan is among the novelities at 
Japan. 

The Faculty committee of Dartmouth 
have cancelled the date of the base-ball 
game with the University of Vermont at 
Burlington. 

A movement is on foot to hold an inter- 
collegiate regatta on Lake George next 
summer, to be open to all colleges except 
Harvard and Yale. 

The advisability of introducing military 
contests into the list of college sports is 
now being discussed by some at the Uni- 
versity of Virginia. 

The Bowdoin juniors have decided on 
June 4 and 5 as the dates for ivy and field 
days respectively. They will wear caps 
and gowns ivy day. 

The dedicatory services of Pratt field 
at Amherst, have been postponed on ac- 
count of the death of Ciiarles Pratt father 
of Frederic B. Pratt the donater. 

At the games of the college of the city 
of New York, on May 2nd, the world's 
record, 61 f sec, for the 440 yards, was 
lowered to 58 f sec. by E. L. Sane. 

The students of Sheffield Scientific School 
are to form a military company, to be in- 
structed by Lieut. C. A. L. Totten, U. S. 
A., the government attach^ of the school. 

Columbia has purchased 20 acres of 
ground, for a new athletic field, at an ex- 
pense of $80,000, and will spend from 
$20,000 to $25,000 in fitting it up. A 
grandstand to accommodate 5,000 people 
will be built and there will be room for 200 
carriages about the athletic field. The 
ground is at Williamsbridge, thirty minutes 
from the Grand Central depot on the New 
York and Harlem railroad. 



There will enter the class of '94 at 
Princeton next year a gentleman 53 years 
of age. During the civil war he was in 
his sophomore year, and then volunteered. 
He now intends to return and complete his 
course. 

Last fall some of the students of Middle- 
bury college Vermont, made a raid on the 
chapel and destroyed the hard wooden 
benches. The falculty had the chapel 
renovated and gave the students soft 
cushions to sit on. 

The faculty of Boston University has 
voted to allow work on the college paper. 
The University Beacon, to count as hours 
in the course, allowing four hours per week 
to the managing editor and two hours per 
week to each of his assistants. 

The Northwestern University announces 
a new departure. It is that fifty-one full new 
scholarships will be created, corresponding 
with the senatorial districts of Illinois, and 
the state senator from each district will 
have the right of nomination to a scholar- 
ship. 

The faculty at Cornell are determined to 
root out the practice of "cribbing," in ex- 
aminations if such a thing is possible. As 
a result of investigations upon the recent 
examinations six students have been sus- 
pended for dishonesty, and it is possible 
that others mav follow. 



MAILS. 

Mail leaves college for P. O. at 1 p. m. 
and 7 p. m. on week days. On Sunday it 
leaves at 4-45 p. m. At the P. O. mails 
close as follows : 

Boston. 
7-45, 8-30,10-15 a.m. ; 4-00, 6-45, 7-45 p.m. 
New York, Western and Southern States. 
7-45, 10-15 A. M. ; 4-00, 6-45, 7-45 p. m. 

Northampton, S^mngfield and Western 

Massachusetts. 

7-20, 10-15, 10-45 A. m. ; 6-45 p. m. 

Northern irnty, N. L. Northern. 

8-30 A. M. 

The treasurer will be at his office from 4 
to 5 p. M. on- Saturdays throughout the 
term . 

The museum of natural history will be 
open to visitors from 1-30 to 3-30 each 
afternoon excepting Saturday and Suuday. 

The college library will be open from 2 
to 4 each afternoon, except Sunday, and 
from 6.30 to 8 each evening, except Sat- 
urday' and Sunday. Also Sunda}' after- 
noon from 1 to 3. 

President Goodell will be at his office 
from 2 to 4 p. m. every afternoon except 
Saturday and Sunday. 






KELLOGG'S BLOCK, 



AMHEEST, MASS. 



Office Hours, 9 to 12 a. m., 1-30 to 5 p. m. 



«S"Ether and Nitrous Oxide Gas administered when 
desired. 



A-rV TH^B 



^MHEp CASH SHOE STOI[E, 

You can g6t tiie most for your money. 
BOOTS AND SHOES, RUBBERS, OVER- 
SHOES, SLIPPERS, TRUNKS, 
AND BAGS. 



REPAIRING NEATLY DONE. 



HAVS/ES & STINSON, 

CASH ROW, AMHERST, MASS. 



AMHERST HOUSE 



LIYERY, FEED, /ND SALE SABLE. 



T. L PAIGE, Prop'r 



HACKS TO AND FROM ALL TRAINS, OM- 
NIBUSES, HACKS, DOUBLE AND 
SINGLE TEAMS FURNISHED 
AT SHORT NOTICE. 
CAREFUL DRIVERS. FAIR PRICES. 

A.MSMRSX, JUASS. 



Slieet Music, 



Music Books, 



Strings 

FOR THE VIOLIN, BANJO, GUITAR, 



Cushman's Music Store, 



.A.I>/IH.EiE,ST. 



J. M, WAITE & SON, 



AND DEAJ^ERS IN 



Hats, Caps, Furs, Truoks, Bags, FuroisliiiiE Goods. 

Latest Styles in Furuishings.- Agent for 

Knox's and Youmau's Hats. Sole 

Agent for Pittsfleld 

Laundry. 

Hats Repaired. Furs Renovated, 

Give us a call l)efore purchasing. 
JVO. S PllaSNIX now, jlMBEItST, MASS. 



I7OWBS ^ I^BLLOGG, 



DHALKILS IN 



-STUDEP'g SUPPLIES 



'>^ 



FANCY GROCERIES, CROCKERY, CIGARS, 

CIGARETTES, TOBACCO, FRUITS 

AND CONFECTIONERY, 

LftlQP gOODS MID KB^OSBI^E OIL, 

SDoors SoHtJi, of r. O., - AMHEKST, MASS. 



EDWIN NELSON, 

Books and Stationery, 

Next door to Post Office, 
AMHERST, MASS. 



I V^ I 



H 



H 



l^mt^rst Mouse, 



o 

AMHERST, MAS.S. 



The undersigned is pleased to announce 
to his former patrons and others desiring 
Game Spreads or Dinners, that he is always 
prepared to accomodate (at short notice) 
large or small parties. 

Ample dining room capacity for 200 peo- 
ple. 

LORENZO CHASE, Prop'R, 



,g^ DEN TISTS,, g, 

C. S. GATES, D. D. S. 
T. G. HUNTING TOl^, D. D. S. 

CUTLJEIt'S BLOCK, AMUEItST, MASS. 



OFFICE HOURS: 
9 A.. Iv^. TO 5 F. Is/E. 

Ether and Nitrous Oxide administered wlien 
desired. 



WOOD'S HOUSE 

HMJ^ DKES2I]3g ]^OOK]g, 

Razors Honed and Shears Sharpened at 
short notice. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



PHOTOGRAPHS. 

The place to go for photographs is at 

® I^BNFtiELD's Studio ^§ 

ON 

AMITY ST., AMHERST,. MASS. 

TINTYPES TAKEN. 

CABINETS fit $2.00, $2.50 and $3.00 pir d03. 

All work warranted first class and satisfac- 
tory. Sittings made without regai'd to weather. 
Instantaneous process used. 

C. R. KENFIELD, 

PHOTOGRAPHER, 



J. L. LOV^ELL, 

^PHOTO&^ftPHE]^.^ 

DRY PLATES, COMPOUND DEVELOPER 

AND SENSITIZED PAPER, READY 

FOR USE. 



PRINTING FOR AMATEURS 



Done in the liest manner. 



AMMEJtST, MASS. 



fm%i Tailor, 



.A>I»/mEB,ST, 



3S/a:.A.SS. 



el. p. FJAWSON, 



DEALEK IN 



¥i/ftTgHE2, 0LO0Kg, JBWBLI^Y 

FINE POCKET CUTLERY, SILVER AND 

PLATED WARE, OPTICAL GOODS 

CANES, SPORTING AND 

FANCY GOODS, 

Gold Pens, Fine Stationery 



REPARING NEATLY and PROMPTLY DONE. 



AMHERST, MASS. 



DWIGHT ffiOOI^E, 



BILLIARD AND POOL 



F.A.R.XjOPL, 



3 Pha'fiix Roitj ( Vp-stairs } , 
AMHERST, MASS, 



Massachusetts Agricultural College, 




A^mlxerst, JMa-sss. 



'Z ^- C 7^. 5w^^.=.lZ^ 





VOL. I. 



AMHERST, MASS., MAY 27, i8gi. 



NO. 16. 



k 



PRINTERS, 



E, 



AMHERST, 



MASS. 



Mass. Agijicultural College, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHERST, MASS. 

We woiilil inform the friends of the college, 
and the public generally, that we are prepared 
to supply 

FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND 

SHRUBS, SMALL FRUITS AND 

PLANTS, 

true to name, also 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 
all at tlie lowest price. 
For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and Small 
Fruits, address. 

Prof. S. T. Maynard, 

AMHERST, MASS 



THE AMHERST 



r/\i 



FURWTURE /ND CARPET STORK 

A complete line of goods suited to the students' 
wants. 

BEDSTEADS, MATTRESSES, PILLOWS, 



STUDY DESKS AND CHAIRS, 
LOUNGES 



WINDOW SHADES, DRAPERIES, 

CARPETS, RUGS, ETC., ETC. 



Ill floods Sfrielhi Cash tniij at T,otvest f rices. 



K. \\ MARSH, 

10 PIlCENrX now, - AMHEIiST, MASS. 



C, H, SANDERSON k CO,, 



CASH DEALERS IN 



^■FII]E 0LOTHII]&,H 

Hats, Caps, Umbrellas, and Gents' 
Furnishing Goods. 



CASH ROW, 



AMHERST. 



S/NDEi|S0H k Thompson, 

CASH DEALERS IN 

Dry and Fancy Goods, 



HOSIERY, RIBBONS, 'AND SMALL 
WARES OF ALL KINDS. 



AMHERST, MASS. 



BOOTSPSHOES 

FOR EVERYBODY. 



A FINE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

DIIESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, 
BALS. AND CONGRESS, 

A FULL LINE OF 

HTJEBEK. C3-OOIDS, 

COUT-BALL SHOE.S AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 

Repairing Done Promptly. 

T. W. SLOAN, 
» I'umifix ROW. 



S. J. SULLIVAN, 



JEALER IN 



Second-Hand Clothes 



FURl^ITURE. 



'Orders promptly attended to. 
I'. O. Box, .'319 AMHERST, MASS. 



WHERE DO YOU RUY m\ ' 

Meerschaum Pipes? 
French Briar Pipes? 
Choice Tobacco? 
Sponges? 
Soap? 

Hair Brushes from 25 cts. up? 
Combs from 5 cts. up? 
Choice New Yorlc Confectionery? 
Shaving Mugs? 
Shaving Soap? 
Lather Brushes? 

Cigarettes, fresh ever.y two weeks? 
The Best Soda in America? 
The Best Bay Rum? 
Imported Perfumes? 
Prescriptions prepared by licensed pharmacists? 
Imported Domestic Tooth Brushes? 

If you have not obtained these uecessaries at 
DEUEL'S DRUG STORE, yon have begun 
wrong. Deuel's is the leading Drug Store in 
Western Mass., and keeps tlic largest assort- 
ment of good.s at bottom prices. 



DEUEL'S DRU& STOR 

Amlierst House Block, Amiierst, lass. 



Lit 



HENRY ADAMS, 

PHARMACIST, 



NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORT- 
ED AND DOMESTIC CIGARS, 
CIGARETTES, ETC., 
MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, 
FISHING TACKLE AND SPORTING GOODS, 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, and Sporting 
and Springfield Rifles. 

Sunday and night calls responded to at resi- 
dence, flvst door west of Wood's Hotel. 



(brugs, Medicines, 

TOILET ARTICLES, 

CONFECTIONERY, CIGARS, CIGARETTES 

AND SMOKERS' GOODS. 



rllYSICIANS' PMESCMIl'TIONS C.lJtE- 
FUI^LT COHrPOXrNDJSD, 



a nicENix ROAv. 
Order your COAIj here. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



VOL. I. 



AiAII-Ip:RST, MASS., MAY 27, 1891. 



No. 16 



THE AMERICAN FARMER AS A 
MANUAL LABORER. 

Agriculture is of primary importance to 
a nation's welfare. It was the first regular 
occupation of man, and to-day a large part 
of the population of our utition are agricul- 
turists, directly or indirectly. It cannot 
die out; it must and will go on. We see 
that the way for the library and the lyceum, 
the school- house and the meeting-house is 
prepared by the prosperous industry on the 
cultivated farm. As young men leave the 
farm to go into other departments, they 
, find that they must be educated ; educated 
for whatever profession or business they 
may desire to take up. So much the more 
must the farmer educate himself. It is the 
popular idea that anyone can become a 
farmer ; but nay, it is a sad mistake. It is 
the lack of intelligence on the part of the 
farmer which tends to keep him down. It 
is one of the greatest causes in the decline 
of agriculture. 

The farmer, the American farmer, must 
educate himself. Fifty or so years ago 
the belief was that the farmer required 
little except a strong, physical frame and a 
well-developied muscle, but now, as a great 
change has taken place, it should be under- 
. stood that as much intelligence is required 
m farming as in any other business. It 
has been said that it required more brain 
work to manage a well equipped farm than 
to govern the United States. The Presi- 
dent can call to his assistance his legal 
advisers, but the farmer, isolated and 
alone, must depend on himself. It is true, 
the farmer may receive aid from the Agri- 
cultural Colleges and Experiment Stations, 
to develop science, which is power, to 
explain its adaptation to agriculture, theo- 
retically, but to apply this power success- 
fully to practical agriculture he has got to 
use a large amount of brain force. 

It is more brain work and less manual 
labor that is needed. Who is the American 
farmer? "He is an American, possessed 
of a strong body, individuality of character 
and a strong will power, capable ol self- 
government, due to his great power of 
resistance and executive ability. 

He stands at the head in relation to 
agriculturists of other nations. In the 
other nations we see the farmer merely a 
peasant. For instance, in Mexico we find 



everything to be asked for; delightful 
climate, scenery ranking with the grandest 
on the globe. Why has she not drawn 
ambitious emigration and outstripped us in 
prosperity. It is simply because her farm- 
ers are peasants, a dependent lower class. 
This is also seen in many of the European 
nations. The American farmer is an inde- 
pendent "middle class," in respect to his 
social standing. 

After a thorough investigation concern- 
ing the condition of the American farmer, 
we conclude that he has not properly edu- 
cated himself. To compete with those 
who are suflSciently intelligent, to supply 
the market with the improved products, it 
is necessary that he receive a better educa- 
tion ; without such intelligence it is diffi- 
cult to make farming pay. To become a 
thorough entrepreneur, he must study into 
his business, know every point, in order 
to produce his products at the smallest 
cost ; he must study the various markets ; 
choose that which seems best adapted 
to his business, in order to get the high- 
est possible price ; he must study into the 
tastes of the people, in order to put up 
his products in the most salable and taking- 
style, to get the first class trade. He must 
choose that branch of agriculture for which 
he has a taste and is best adapted, as well 
as investigating into the character of the 
soil of his farm, and to learn whether it 
will be adapted to that branch of farming 
which he has made a choice. To keep 
himself posted concerning the market 
reports and the agricultural topics of the 
day, as well as the transaction of the 
state and national governments, he should 
read some of the thorough-going, farming 
and political papers of the day. 

He must travel, visiting some of the best 
farmers ; get the ideas of his fellow farmers. 
In this way he can gain the experience of 
others. By the failure of one man, he 
may be able to receive some benefit. His 
work should be planned out before com- 
mencing. If this'is done, the spring work 
can be commenced at the proper time and 
continued without delay. By a study of 
the various meteorological records, which 
vary but little from year to year, he can 
get the average number of unpleasant days. 
Such knowledge will be ot vital importance 
to the farmer m making up his plan. The 



woik should be laid out in a systematic 
way. System is a key note to success. 
We do not see these great mercantile 
houses in our large cities work in a dis- 
orderly way, but the business is carried on 
systematically. It is just here, where we 
find one of the farmer's failures. He fails 
to work on a firm foundation, as it were. 
His business qualifications are limited. 
Ask most any farmer how his business is ; 
too often he will tell you, " Farming does 
not pay." He does not know whether 
farming actually pays or not, for the 
simple reason that he never keeps an 
account of his business. Many keep a 
simple cash-book, but that is too often 
improperly kept. It is necessary that he 
keep a set of books to know his financial 
standing at the end of each year ; then if 
he has failed at any point in his business, 
he can amend it the succeeding year. The 
farmer's business is closely connected with 
other departments of the business world. 

He furnishes the raw material for the 
manufacturers ; he is the customer of many 
of "the products manufactured ; he feeds 
the people of our country. It is upon him 
the wealth of the nation depends. It 
would be for the best interest of the farmer 
to be more closel\' related to men of other 
business departments, by co-operating with 
the manufacturers and wholesale dealers, 
doing away with the middlemen, or, at 
least, transact business in such a way as 
to have the middlemen serve the farmer, 
which is their proper duty, and not the 
farmer serving the middlemen. The farmer 
has succeeded well as a producer, but as 
an exchanger, he has been at the mercy of 
the middlemen. There should be mutual 
relationship between the manufacturer and 
the farmer. 

It is by study ; by more brain work that 
the farmer is going to overcome these difl3- 
culties. He is then bound to be heard and 
respected by all men. He is bound to 
meet with success. I can do no better 
than to quote these words, to show what 
business methods will insure success : 

1. "Main or cash crops suited to soil, 
market, labor and tastes of the owners. 

2. "A perfect system. Head work 
instead of heel work. Plans formed before 
work begins, not afterwards. 

3. " Every waste utilized. Stock, labor 
and tools — all — save something. 



122 



AGGIE LIFE. 



4. " Organization. Tlie possibility of 
doing business enougli to avoid all the 
middlemen's profits. 

5. " A natural growth. Alwaj's mov- 
ing forward, but never getting too far into 
deep water. Know what you are about." 

Is there any better advice for a young 
farmer anywhere? 

The farmer says he has no time to read, 
hardly time to think ; too much work to do. 
That is the very reason why he does not 
have any more time. If he would only 
put his whole soul into his business ; study 
into it and find out the difficulties and 
remedy them, then his work could be more 
easily accomplished ; hence more time for 
the intellectual part. 

Therefore, it is higher educational qual- 
ifications and systematic, business-like 
methods of farming together with thorough 
planning at the proper time, which will 
lead to success, and advance the farmer to 
a higher stand both in the social and busi- 
ness world. 

If a farmer tries to set a good example 
to his hired help, by digging as fast as his 
strength will permit on one part of his 
farm, others will be suffering for want of 
his attention. It is not possible for him 
to do as much hard work as his best man 
and at the same time keep himself informed 
of the best time to do everything. JThe 
question has been reversed ; the farmers 
have no time for so much manual labor. 
The time has come when the farmer must 
spend a considerable portion of his time in 
close observation of the growing crops, 
and give much thought to the maturing of 
plans for working the farm with the great- 
est economy and largest profits. 

A. H. S. 



VISIT OF THE LEGISLATURE. 

During the latter part of last week the 
committees of Agriculture, Education, and 
Military, of the State Legislature inspected 
the college in all its departments. The 
party arrived at Amherst early Thursday 
night. Late in the evening Pres. Goodell 
gave them a reception at his residence, at 
which the members of the Faculty weie 
present. On Friday morning before turn- 
ing over the college to the committee Pres. 
Goodell made a strong appeal in behalf of 
the wants of the college. There is urgent 
need, he said, foi' the dividing of the chairs 
of Botany and Mathematics and also for 
increased facilities in Chemistry and Eng- 
lish. In speaking of the question at in- 
terest between this college and the Insti- 
tute of Technology he said that the federal 



appropriation was for further education in 
Agriculture and Mechanic Art. This col- 
lege is the only state institution teaching 
Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, and con- 
sequently she is entitled to the appropria- 
tion. After chapel the committee went 
through the museum paying especial atten- 
tion to the models, thence to the tower 
where Prof. Warner explained the work- 
ings of the meterological instruments. 

At 9-30 dress parade was formed on the 
campus and was followed by a short bat- 
talion drill. After the military exercise 
the committees inspected the several de- 
partments of the college, beginning at the 
barn, then, taking in both experiment 
buildings, where considerable interest was 
created, they came to the Botanic Depart- 
ment, the gardens of which they vie wed from 
the top of the hill. They then looked into 
the systems of work carried on at the lusec- 
tory and found it one of the most fascinat- 
ing features of the college. As a result of 
their inspection there was not a man on 
the committees but who expressed himself 
most favorably in regard to the work of the 
college, each one being impressed with the 
thought that the Mass. Agr'l College is a 
working college, and that its teachings in- 
clude the practical part of education as well 
as the theoretical. 



A GREAT FRENCH AGRICUL- 
TURALIST. 

The subject of this article, M. le Comte 
Adriea Elienne Pierre de Gasparin, was 
born at Orange, France, June 29, 1789. 

After a short military service, he retired 
into private life to the delightful study and 
practice of scientific agriculture in which he 
was destined to become one of . France's 
most distinguished writers and leaders. 

His writings soon attracted the attention 
of the Institute of France and of several 
other learned societies by whom some of 
his dissertations had prizes awarded to 
them, or were couronne's. 

In 1830 he was made Prefect of the Loire, 
later of Isere, and still later of the Rhone. 
In these high positions he distinguished 
himself by his firm and energetic manage- 
ment. By a decree of April 19, 1834, he 
was raised to the peerage, continuing the 
administration of the Rhone prefecture, till 
his appointment as Under-Secretary of the 
Ministry of the Interior, the cabinet posi- 
iiou of the Interior falling to him Sept. 6, 
1836. 

Although not a brilliant parliamentary 
debater, he directed his department with! 
ability and fidelity, introducing needed 



reforms into hospital, alms-house, and lun- 
atic asylum management and into prison 
discipline. To this philanthropic and ener- 
getic statesman France owes the suppres- 
sion of the convict chain, that relic of bar- 
barism. Condemned criminals,, before his 
time, when taken to prison had chains 
attached to their necks, and these fetters 
were linked to a longer and heavier chain 
which served to confine a row of about 
thirty prisoners. M. de Gasparin altered 
this vandal system to the more humane and 
simpler one of conveying convicts in car- 
riages to their place of detention. 

This distinguished man became in 1840 
member of the Institute of France and in 
1848 director of the newly founded Agri- 
cultural Institute of Versailles in which 
congenial position he hoped to found .and 
organize a great system of agricultural 
education. Vain hopes ! They were sadly * 
disappointed by the promulgatioia of a gov- 
ei'ument decree which suppressed the Insti- 
tute. In 1855 the subject of this article 
was named chairman of the jury for agri- 
culture in connection with the International 
Exhibition. A few years afterward, in 
1862, his death followed, hastened, no 
doubt, by his arduous efforts in that oflSce 
and as member of the Institute of France. 
This eminent agriculturalist, whose 
greatest work a "Course of Agriculture, 
treating of soils, manures, improvements 
tools, apparatus, machines, rnral dwellings, 
meteorological phenomena, modes of cul- 
ture," etc., [Paris, 1843-49, 5 vols.] 
would alone have made him celebrated, 
was the author of many other minor desser- 
tations wherein are considered many of the 
most important subjects relating to agri- 
culture. He was one of the most learned 
as well as one of the most progressive 
agricultural writers of his day. He was 
one of the first to look at farming from the 
double aspect of physical and natural 
science on the one hand, and of economical 
truth (such as capital, labor, markets, and 
kindred topics) on the other, one of the 
leaders of the great modern School of 
Scientific farmers, represented so well by 
our college and similar institutions. 

A great son of this great sire was M. le 
Comte Ageua Etienne de Gasparin, one of 
the most distinguished religious (Protes- 
tant), political, and literary leaders ot 
France. 

We are indebted for .the above facts to 
"le Dictronnaire Universel of Pierre 
Larousse" and to "la Nouvelle Biographic 
gt'u^rale" published by Firmin Didot 
Fr^res. W. B. C. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



123 



COMMUNICATION. 

Dear Editors : — As some of your read- 
ers are, perhaps, tliiuking of joining the 
raulvS of the G3'psy Moth army they may 
like to know something of its organization 
and work. 

The word " army" was applied first, I 
think, by the newspaper men, and as if to 
further carry out the ideas the writer at one 
time received an order from the Director 

to allow Mr. to report to the office 

at noon "as he had been detailed for duty 
in the experimental squad." Quite military 
was it not? 

When we first came here everything was 
to be accomplished in the way of organiza- 
tion and discipline. But now, owing 
to the hard work of the director and two 
or three of the superintendents, the work is 
being done and the details are arranged 
for in a good business-like manner, which 
means in this case a certain amount of red 
tape. 

As now arranged the vrork is in charge 
of the Board of Agriculture who, as you 
know, appointed Mr. Sessions, Prof. 
Shaler, and Mr. Appleton to oversee the 
work. They selected Mr. Fovbush for 
director. Under him are the superintend- 
ents of whom there are about six, each 
having charge of one or more towns. 

Next in order are the inspectors, some of 
whom are foremen and some scouts. Then 
come the men, drivers, etc. There are 
besides three or four clerks and an entomol- 
ogist. 

The men wear blue badges, the inspect- 
ors red ones and the superintendents white 
ones. All are inscribed thus : Mass. Board 
of Agriculture, Gypsj' Moth Department 
and on the red and white ones the words 
"Inspector," and "Superintendent" are 
added respectively. ' Moreover the super- 
intendents have their badges fringed proba- 
bly because they don't do work enough to 
soil them. 

The work we are at now is spraying 
trees with paris green. Each inspector 
has a barrel mounted on a one horse cart 
of some kind. To the barrel which holds 
about one hundred gallons of water is 
attached a pump and four hundred feet of 
hose in two lines of varying lengths. To 
work this we have four men and the driver. 
Carrying the hose up trees is the hardest 
part of the men's work in spraying. But 
working the pump is no snap. A man 
who is afraid of, or unable to work is of no 
use. 



Some of the duties of the inspectors 
during spraying are as follows. He must 
see that the men wear their badges m ft 
conspicuous place and do not smoke during 
working hours. He must go to the stand- 
pipe wlien . the tank is filled and take the 
time of going, personally mix the paris 
green, direct where to station the cart, 
look out for the kinks in the hose, see that 
windows are shut, no clothes exposed to 
the spray, no one sprinkled while passing 
by, watch the men spraying to see that 
they do it thoroughly, watch the men at 
the pump to see that they keep the stirrer 
going, see that sprayed trees are marked, 
and it the men are busy, help set ladders, 
carry hose, and do lots of other things 
besides making out his daily report, keep- 
ing the time of his men, etc. So you can 
judge whether he has a snap or not. 
Besides all this, new and contradictory 
orders are issued every other day or 
so. 

The men get $1.50 per day. for the first 
two weeks and then $2.00. They put in 
nine hours at whatever place their work 
may be, besides coming and going. There 
are, I think, about one hundred and eighty 
men on the force. 

There is probably an idea that we college 
fellows are running this business. Such is 
not the case. We are simply foremen, as 
are fifteen or twenty other men who are 
not college men. There are three or four 
Aggie alumni here, but, I think, that with 
one exception, they started as men at $1.50 
per day and worked up. 

Being students is, to a certain extent, 
against us. Men do not like to be bossed 
by "boys." 

In considering the financial part of the 
question our pay is not very large. Board 
and lodging cost from $4.50 to $5.50 per 
week, and with all the extra expenses for 
car fares, etc. , there is no danger of our 
becoming Vauderbilts from this job. 

It takes all our time, leaving us so tired 
at night that we cannot study or do much 
of anything else. 

Although we have many amusing experi- 
ences with people, it is not exactly a pleas- 
ure to invade a man's premises against his 
will, and know that he would kick you out 
if he was able. 

I will not worry your patience further 
with this subject, as I think I have written 
enough to show you that whoever tries to 
be a "bugger" must come prepared to 
work and work hard. 

F. L. G. 



SPRING AT M. A. C. 

As the spring-time's warmtli relieves ns 
From the winter's bitter cold, 

We rejoice to seejt coming, 
Coming softly as of old. 

It must cheer the heart of Freshman, 

For he thinlts within himself, 
" Now I'll loose my coat of verdure, 
Now I'll lay it on the shelf." 

" For some other little Freshman 
Who will take my place some day, 

And whose life will be a burden 
Should he venture in my way." 

But the Sophomore's thoughts are different, 

DitTerent, it is very clear, 
For he's thinking, nearly always, 

Thinking of his Junior year ; 

When he'll guide the feet of Freshmen 
In the paths they ought to tread, 

How he'll lead them on the campus 
As they never yet were led. 

But to the present Junior 

As he drives the bugs away, 
Spring is but a silent warning 

Of his graduation day ; 

For soon he'll be a Senior 
With but one more year to stay, 

And then he'll never, no, he'll never 
Fool his valued time away. 

Yet our Seniors, quiet Seniors, 
With their proud and stately mien, 

Only say a very little 
For their pocket-books are lean ; 

For in spring they spend their money 

For their graduation things, 
Yet to them there is a sadness 

Which their parting often brings. 

They have been just four years with us, 
And have trod In victor's paths, 

But they'll leave us now forever, 
Leave us for their better halves. 

Whom they'll find la every country 

Waiting patiently to see. 
Delegates from Aggie College, 

Husbands from the M. A. C. 

But a warning we will give yon — • 
To what trade your hand you'll lend, 

Always in a far-off country 
Think of Alma Mater then. 

And if Fate will kindly lead you 
In a path made smooth and straight, 

Shower down your thousands on us, 
On your Aggie College mates. 

Then your name will be immortal 
And we'll build a grand new " gym," 

Dedicated to your honor 
And the maintenance of limb. 

C. A. S. 



124 



AGGIE LIFE. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Publislied Fortnightly by the Students of the 
Mass. Agricultural College. 



Terms $1,00 per year, in advance. 



Single copies, 10c. 



Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter., 

BOARD OJT EDITORS : 

11. E. CRANE, '92, Editor-in-Chief, 
G. B. WILLARD, '92, Business Manager, 
G. E. TAYLOR, '92, K. H. SMITH, '93, 

G. F. CURLEY, '93, B. SEDGWICK, '93, 

C. F. WALKER, '94. 



Address all commuuicatious to the Business Manager. 



tU?,?tU^t^ U \Kti^^V,tl\lS,t^ ?^\U^t?,S. 



There seems to be a growing tetideney 
among the students to " cut " chapel on 
Snndaj'S. Many go on long tramps or ou 
botanizing expeditions and seem to tliink 
there is no harm in missing the chapel 
exercises. No wonder our pastor hesitates 
to exchange with other ministers. He can- 
not be sure that the visiting minister will 
have more tUau the empty seats to preach 
to. Then, too, how much encouraged our 
pastor must feel to see as many empty seats 
as there were last Sunday? How can a 
man be expected to preach under such cir- 
cumstances? Then, too, students do not 
seem to realize that chapel is a regular 
college exercise and that it is of even more 
importance than many of the week day 
exercises. 



Among the other attractions of Com- 
mencement weeii why can not we have a 
base-ball game ? At other colleges such 
a game is made one of tlie prominent 
features of Commencement, and what 
better way than this to interest both 
students and visitors in our athletics? But 
if a game with another college nine is im- 
practicable let us at least have a class game 
as, for instance, between the classes of '91 
and '92. A recent game between these 
two classes ended in a manner rather un- 
satisfactory to both sides, and as they are 
very evenly matched a game between them 
at Commencement would undoubtedly be 
highly interesting. For the past few years 
our class base-ball games have been close 
and exciting, and if one is played by the 
two classes it will certainly not be the least 
of the Commpncemeut attractions. By all 
means let the class captains get together at 
once and see what can be done, and if one 
is arranged, have the two teams go into 
practice immediately. 



Only one more of the class games re- 
mains to be played. The date has not yet 
been fixed upon. These games during the 
whole series have been iniusually exciting, 
and with one exception they have ended in 
a manner satisfactory to all. .At no time 
was one able to make a good guess as to 
whom the championship would be awarded. 
A tie now exists between the Seniors and 
Freshmen. When played off the whole 
matter will be decided. These classes have 
each won two games and lost one. But, 
interesting as these games have been, thej' 
have proved a hindrance to the work of the 
college team rather than a benefit. True, 
some new players have been developed in 
this way, but that will hardly make up for 
the loss of practice of the college team be- 
fore important games. .. Several of the class 
contests have occurred the day preceding a 
college game. This is not as it should be. 
The 'Varsity team should have the field that 
day, and thus prevent its men from playing 
a class game in altogether different posi- 
tions from those they hold on the team. 
Nothing can add more to the degeneration 
of tlie team than these things. So let it be 
hoped that in coming j'ears the true welfare 
of the college will be looked to in the 
arranging of class games. 



The announcement of the date of our 
field day, and the programme of events, 
have been eagerly looked for, during the 
greater part of these last two terms. It 
was only last week that the Athletic Asso- 
ciation decided not to have field day. To 
many of us the outcome is not a surprise, 
as the interest shown by the would-be parti- 
sans has been very weak compared with 
what it should be. This lack of spirit was 
not altogether their own fault. The Asso- 
ciation for some unknown reason appeared 
verj- cautious about announcing what events 
would take place, and how long a time 
there would be for training. Eitlier they 
were afraid that if these tilings were not 
kept secret some one would win the prizes, 
or they were very negligent about the mat- 
ter and had withered greatly in spirit since 
the mass-meeting last fall. We now iiave 
some of the essential apparatus which, if 
care is taken of it, will last for years. Some 
have had tiie excuse for not ti'aining, that 
Ihey were waiting for this apparatus. That 
may be the case in some instances, but 
running, broad jumping, and the like, do 
not require these things. In the future let 
more interest be taken in this line. These 
sports will have to come sooner or later, 
and judging from the spirit exhibited in the 



mass meeting last fall, it was thought that 
the field day custom would begin this term. 
Since this is not the case we have only to 
look forward to its introduction next year, 
trusting that use will be made of the out- 
come of this year's lack of interest 



Ever since the founding of the Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College a quarter of 
a century ago it has found among the citi- 
zens of this commonwealth friends who 
have watched its growth with untiring in- 
terest, giving it a helping hand in time of 
misfortune and planning for its further 
development and improvement in time of 
prosperity. Many a time in the earliest 
days of the college, when the future seemed 
so dark and uncertain, a great deal has been 
due to the untiring efforts of these friends. 
The farmer has always been interested in 
the institution that was tbunded bj' those 
interested in his welfare for his benefit. In 
later years, when through the generosity of 
both state and general government, the 
college has enjoyed more than usual pros- 
perity, this interest has still been kept up. 
When in 1889, through the untiring efforts 
of the friends of agriculture and agricultural 
colleges the general government passed a 
bill appropriating a large sum of money 
for the benefit of colleges of agriculture and 
the mechanic arts, all felt that at last there 
would be an opportunity for the college to 
extend its influence and to increase the good 
it was doing for tlie farmer. That the 
money was intended solely for colleges of 
agriculture and the mechanic arts no one 
had a doubt. What was the surprise then 
when the Institute of Technology put in a 
claim for a i)ortion of this appropriation. 
The Institute is a private institution sup- 
ported by large donations from private 
individuals, reaching up into hundreds of 
thousands of dollars. It is not a state in- 
stitution. A large per cent, of its students 
are from other states than Massachusetts. 
Although receiving a third of the original 
laud grant it is by no means included under 
the term "colleges of agriculture and the 
mechanic arts." The committee on Finance 
to. whom the matter was referred, having 
reported a bill to the legislature by which 
ihe college is to receive two thirds of the 
appropriation and the Institute one-third, 
the action of the senate and house on the 
matter is of great significance to the college. 
Alumni of the college, now is the time to 
use your influence. Do all you can to pro- 
mote the highest welfare and prosperity of 
your Alma Mater. Do not forget the ob- 
ject for which the college was founded and 



AGGIE LIFE. 



125 



exert your best energies that it may receive 
that to which it is rightfully entitled. 
Farmers of the state, now is the time to act. 
For twent3- years you have received tlic 
benefit of an agricultural college founded 
for your express benefit. Now is the time 
to use your influence in its behalf. 



MASS. AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, 
TWENTY-FIRST COMMENCE- 
MENT, 1891. 

Sunday, June 7, Baccalaureate Sermon by 
Rev. Chas. S. Walker, Ph. D. 
Professor of Mental Science, at 
10.45 A. M. 

Address before the Y. M. C. A. 
by Rev. John Bascomb, D. D., 
LL. D., of Williamstown, Mass., 
at 8 p. M. 

Monday, June 8, Kendall Prize Speaking, 
at 8 p. M. 
Class Day Exercises, at 2 p. m. 

Tuesday, June 9, Griunell Prize Examina- 
tion, of the Senior class in Agri- 
culture, at 8.30 A. M.. 
Trustee Meeting, office of Hatch 
Station at 2 p. m. 
Alumni Meeting in the old chapel 
building at 2.30 p. m, 
Dress Parade, Battalion Drill, 
Sabre Drill at 4 p. m. 
Reading of Military Essays, Pre- 
senting of Military Diplomas, at 
5 P. M., in the stone chapel. 
Reception of the President and 
Trustees in the stone chapel from 
8 to 10 p. M. 
Senior Promenade, 10 p. m. to 

2 A. M. 

Wednesday, June 10, Graduating Exer- 
cises at 10 A. M. 

Thursday, June 18, Exaniination of Can- 
didates for admission, at tiie Bo- 
tanic Museum, at 9 a. m. 



CL^SS DAY EXERCISES. 

IVY CEREMONIES. 

Ivy Oration, H. T. Field. 

Ivy Poem, H. J. Legate. 

Ivy Soug. 
Class Oration, W. A. Brown. 

Campus Exercises. 
Campus Oration, W. C. Paige. 

Campus Poem, W. W. Gay. 

Class Song. 
Pipe Oration, A. G. Eames. 

Farewell Song. 
Class Yell, College Yell, Alumni Yell. 

Music, ' M. A. C. Band. 



RAILROAD TRAINS. 

Trains on tlie New London Nortliern 

Railroad as follows : — Leave Amherst for 

the north at 8-53 a. m. 2-48 and 8-01 p. m. 

For the south at 6-53 a. m., 12-12 and 4-40 

p. M. 

Trai.is on the Central Massachusetts 
leave Amherst for Boston at 5-23, 6-15, 
8-30 A. M. and 2-35 p. m. Leave Amherst 
for Northampton at 7-15, 10-32 and 11-16 
A. M., 1-25, 5-19, 5-35, 7-24, and 8-32 p. m. 



GLEANINGS. 

— Another new patent out. 

— "Please stoj) that noise." 

—May 14. Prolonged Agony. 

—Where is John H. Kellogg, '94? 

— Our last issue will appear June 9. 

— The tennis courts are well patronized. 

— College closes two weeks from to-day. 

— E. P. Felt '91, visited his home last 
week. 

— There was no inspection Saturday 
morning. 

— The Freshmen have commenced Trig- 
onometry. 

— Pres. Goodell was in Boston Monday 
and Tuesday. 

— Who sounded the drum for drill Fri- 
day morniug? 

— Six innings were enough to satisfy 
the Wesleyau boys. 

— There was a very small attendance in 
the chapel last Sunday. 

— All the Seniors will obtain diplomas 
from Boston University. 

— L. F. Horner '91, has been spending 
a few days in Greenfield. 

— H. B. Emerson '92, has fully recover- 
ed from his recent illness. 

— The band has been engaged to play in 
Wilbraham decoration day. 

— The annual Intercollegiate meet takes 
place at Springfield to-day. 

— Target practice has been discontinued 
for the remainder of the term. 

— May 13, the Sophomores were defeated 
by tiie Juniors. Score 20-7. 

— Candidates for the coming fershman 
class are beginning to appear. 

— Professors Brooks and Maynard did 
not meet their classes May 18. 

— The Thomson-Houston's of Lynn 
will play here Decoration day. 

— Prof. Canavaii has provided suitable 
benches for the base ball team. 



— The freshman class took a final ex- 
amination in geometry May 18. 

— Evangelist D. L. Moody visited the 
College last Monday morning. 

— Davis and Morse '94 spent Sunday at 
the latter's home in Belchertown. 

— The flower-beds in front of South col- 
lege have been filled with plants. 

— May 18, considerable difficulty was 
experienced in raising the flag staff. 

— The 'Varsity team played a practice 
game with the Freshmen last Friday. 

— The D. G. K. Fraternity will publish 
the Cycle as usual at Commencement. 

— Howard, son of Prof. S. T. Maynard, 
was quite ill with pneumonia last week. 

— Our band has been badly crippled ow- 
ing to the absence of several members. 

— It is a curious fact that we can defeat 
nine men, yet the tenth one conquers every 
time. 

— May 16, the Sophomores were victo- 
rious over the Freshmen by a score of 24' 
to 12. " 

— Drill e^'ery day last week caused by 
the absence of Lieut. Cornish the week 
before. 

— A number of the students intend to 
work exterminating the gypsy during the 
summer. 

— May 17, Mr. Street of Williams and 
Mr. Chalmers of Brown addressed the Y. 
M. C. A. 

— The Ba}' State Agricultural Society 
will hold an Institute at the College, June- 
11 and 12. 

— C. H. Johnson, '91, has accepted a 
position as assistant chemist at the State 
Ex. Station. 

—We would advise the citizens of Mai- 
den and vicinity to let our foot ball players 
severely alone. 

—May 21, '93 drink "Moxie" in Prof. 
Brooks' room, at the expense of one of 
their number. 

— The members of the Legislature ex- 
pressed themselves much pleased with the 
battalion drill. 

— May 16, our ball team defeated the 
Wesley an Academy team by a score of 18- 
5 in six innings. 

— The grounds around the Botanic Mu- 
seum never looked more beautiful than at 
the present time. 

— E. W. Morse, '94, who was called 
home by the death of his father will not 
return to college this term. 



126 



AGGIE LIFE. 



— Rev. John Bascomb who is to ad- 
dress the Y. M. C. A. comiBencement was 
a former President of Williams College. 

— Pratt-fleld was dedicated Ma}' 22. 
The dedication was followed by a ball 
game between Amherst and Dartmouth. 

— We were to play Wesleyan University 
here May 18, but for some unknown cause 
they cancelled the game, presumably on 
account of our record the Saturday before. 

• — The Board of Control of the State Ex- 
periment Station will hold its regular 
commencement week meeting at the sta- 
tion, Wednesday, June 10, at 12.30 
2 p. M. 

— A meeting was held by the citizens of 
Medford recently, protesting against the 
use of Paris green, by the Gypsy moth 
Commission, claiming that thu cure was 
worse than the evil. 

— The Massachusetts Agricultural Col- 
lege Alumni club of Massachusetts will 
hold a special business meeting in the New 
Chapel Reading room, Wednesday, June 
10, at twelve o'clock m. 

— W. Fletcher, '92, for some reason 
known only to himself, has quit the dia- 
mond. This leaves the team at a disad- 
vantage, as another shortstop will have to 
be broken in at this late day. 

— The drill for Commencement will be 
dress parade and battalion drill followed 
by artillery drill under the officers of Co. 
B, company drill under the oflHcers of Co. 
A, and sabre drill under the officers of 
Co. C. 

— The members of the class of '91 and 
all alumni and former students are cordial- 
ly invited to attend the meeting of the 
Massachusetts Agricultural College Alum- 
ni Club of Massachusetts, Wednesday, 
June 10. 

— May 20, the class game between '91 
and '92 was called. They played two in- 
nings when a dispute arose from a decision 
of the umpire, and as a result '92 refused 
to play. The game was therefore given 
to the seniors. 

— Our usual Y. M. C. A. meeting was 
omitted Sunday afternoon to allow all stu- 
dents an opportunity to accept the kind in- 
vitation of Dr. Burroughs to attend the 
meeting held by Rev. D. L. Moody in 
College Hall. 

— At a meeting of the Executive Com- 
mittee of the State Board of Agriculture 
held May 21, the resignation of Prof . N. 
S. Shalerofthe Examining Committee of 



the Agricultural College was accepted, and 
Mr. W. A. Kilbourn of South Lancaster 
was elected in his place. 

— Through the efforts of Pres. Goodell 
enough copies of Agriculture of Massa- 
chusetts were procured for all the stu- 
dents. The members of the senior class 
also received copies of the Year Book of 
Boston University and a limited number 
were divided among the three lower classes. 

— The Handbook of Amherst ^ edited by 
Frederick H. Hitchcock, '91, of Amherst 
College, is to be out in time for our Com- 
mencement. The book is handsomely 
bound, with about 70 illustrations and con- 
tains a history of our college, with the de- 
scription of the buildings, and pictures. 
President Goodell has looked over the 
proof and has expressed himself as much 
pleased with the representation the college 
has. An authorized agent is to sell the 
book here at commencement time. The 
volume is valuable and cheap. It sells for 
one dollar. 



ALUMNI NOTES. 
Arthur N. Stone, '90, is to be married 
to Miss Mary C. Wilkins at Hudson, Mass., 
to-morrow, May 28. 

Clinton E. Bliss, '90, has been visiting 
M. A. C. for a few days. 

Mark N. North, 89, who has recently 
recovered from a severe illness is now stop- 
ping at Brownsville, Vt. 

H. J. Wheeler, '83, accompanied by Mrs. 
Wheeler visited friends in Amherst last 
week. 

Prof. C. S. Plumb, '82, of Purdue Uni- 
versity has been elected one of the directors 
for the dairy display at the World's Fair. 

Married at Shelburne, May 5, Ralph H. 
Cushman, M. A. C, '87, to Lizzie M. 
Burrington. 

The present address of Messrs. Barry 
and McCloud of the class of '90 is Suit 8, 
Boscobel, Lynn, Mass. 



PRAYER MEETING TOPICS. 

May 28th — Without God no Success. Ps. 
127:1; John 15:5. H. T. 
Shores. 
May 31st— Faith. Heb. 11. Professor 

Mills. 
June 4th — Paul's Farewell Words to the 
Ephesians. Eph. 6:10-24. H. 
E. Crane. 




^^^ 




\ 






Bii II I II FRANK WOOD will get up 

Spr<,„,L .„. i..,^ J^„j = „!.iB wiDter. Send your orders 
right along to get there first. 



Go to BLODGETT & CLAEK 
for CLOTHS or FURNISHIN"G 
GOODS. 

They keep the best Une and use 
the students well. 

Take your laundry to them Mon- 
day or Wednesday morning and 
you will get good work. 

ELOPgET^ ^ 6M^K 

.JOHN MULLEN, 

DEALER IN — 

MEATS and PROVISIONS, 

VEGETABLES OF ALL KINDS IN SEASON, 

PISH AND OYSTERS, FOREIGN 

AND DOMESTIC FRUITS, 

AND CANNED 

GOODS. 

Palmer's Block, Main Street. 



E. R. BENNETT, 
Jeweler, 

Optician, 

Watchmaker. 

FINE GOODS ! LOW PRICES ! 

GOOD WORK WARRANTED, 

First Door from Post Office. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



127 



IF YOU WANT TO GET OYSTERS IN ANY 
STYLE GO TO 

E. B. ARNOLD'S ' 

0Y2TE^ gfiPE, 

Students are attended at short notice. 



Open all clays of the week until 12 o'clock. 
Sundays from 9 a. m. to 12-30 p. m., and from 
7 p. M. to 11 p. M. 

William's Block, Merchants' Row. 



The title page of this book was drawn and engraved by 

John S*"'":^'Sj 

6 Davis Street, BOSTON, MASS. 

The various publications of Bates, Bo^vdoin, Colby, 
Tufts, Mass. Agricultural College, VVellesly and Yale 
have used his work. He will submit sketches and cari- 
catures for your approval. 



OFFICE OF 



EDWARD A. THOMAS, 

Fii|E/f(D Life IpRANCE JIgei^t. 

REAL ESTATE :F0R SALE AND TO LET. 



Office, CooJcs JRlocJCf A.mJiersti Mass. 



. GEO. GRAVES, 

DEALER IN 

i Painters' Supplies 

Personal attention given to Frescoing, Dec- 
orating and Paper Hanging, and all 
Interior and Exterior 
House Painting. 

feasant St, near L, J, Spears Sliop, 



AMHERST COLLEGE 

CO-OPERATIVE 8TEi imw 

and Carpet Renovavini Establislinient, 



Aggie Agent, H. M. HOWARD, '91. 



Work taken Monday delivered Wednesday. 
" " Wednesday delivered Saturday. 

= ^<^TISrA.Ca?ION- arXJA.:RA.lSTT:E:ET}, 

OFFICE AT BRINE'S. 

H. A. UTLEY, Manager. 



BASE-BALL. 

Aggie, 18 ; Wesleyan, 5. 
'J"he game witii Wesleyan Academy, May 
16, was played in a pouring rain, making 
good ball playing impossible. The feat- 
ures of the game were batting and good 
team work of the Aggie nine, while Petty 
and Rist played best for Wesleyan. The 



Curley, If, 
Parker, ct, , 
Paige, c, 
Euggles, lb. 
Crane, p, 
Willard, ss, 
Hull, 3b, 
Davis, rf, 
Howard, 2b, 



lb T B P o 



A 


2 

8 
1 
1 




Total, 


39 IS 


12 


14 


18 


12 


4 




WESLEYAN. 












A B R 


1 E 


T B 


P 


A 


E 


Jester, lb, 


3 





1) 








1 


Barnura, lb, 


3 








2 


4 


2 


Eadoslavoff, If, 


5 1 


1 


1 


1 





2 


Kist, p, cf , 


3 1 


2 


2 


1 


1) 


J 


Reed, rf. 


2 1 

















Rogers, ss, 


3 








1 


2 


1 


Petty, c. 


3 1 


1 


1 


3 


I 





Pulver, p, cf. 


1 1 





u 


I 


b 


1 


Mason, 3b, 


2 


u 















Total, 23 5 4 4 18 12 ' S 

Base on balls— Aggies 6, Wesleyan 2. Sti'uck out— 
Curley, Ruggles, Willard, Jester 2, Baruum 3, Kist, Pet- 
ty. Two-base hits — Curley, Crane. Double play— How- 
ard. Passed ball — Paige. Wild pitches — Crane 1, Pul- 
ver 7. Umpires— Lehnert, M. A. C, '93, aiid Goodwin, 
Wesleyan. Scorer— Rogers. 

Aggie '93, 24; Aggie '94, 12. 
The game opened with '93 at the bat and 
after the second inning the score continued 
in their favor throughout the game. The 
score : — 



AE 

7 
7 
7 



Howard, c. 
Perry, 2b, 
Curley, p, 
Davis, lb, V 

Bartlett, ss, 6 
F. A. Smith, 3b, 6 
C.A.Smith,cf,6 
Staples, if, 6 
Tinoco, rf , 6 



AGGIE '93. 

K IB T B 

2 5 5 

2 2 2 

4 

3 

1 



SB P O 
10 
1 

1 
1 
1 








Totals, 58 24 IS 23 

AGGIE '94. 



Parker, c, 
Barton, cf, p, 
Dickinson, p, cf, 3b, 
Davis, lb. 
Morse, A. J., 2b, 
Fowler, ss, 
Goessmann, 3b, cf, 
Putnam, If, 
Robbins, rf, 



ARK 13TESBP0 







A 


E 


•2 


4 


2 





12 





n 


2 


(1 





2 


1 





1 


(1 











18 


8 


A 


E 


2 


2 



43 12 10 16 



16 27 17 13 

7 8 9 

1 4 4—24 

1 2—12 



Total, 

Innings, 12 3 4 5 
Aggie '93, 15 7 
Aggie '94, 10 4 2 1 

Two-base hits— Davis '93 3, Staples, Davis '94, Barton, 
Parker, Goessmann. Three-base hits — Staples, Davis 
'94. Base on called balls^'91 4. Base on hit by pitched 
ball — Putnam. Out hit by batted ball — Goessmann. 
Struck out — By Curley 11, Dickinson 3, Barton 4. Left 
on bases— '93 4, '94 8. " First base on errors— '93 12, '94 6. 
IJnipires— Crane and Euggles. Scorer— Keith. 

Aggie '92, 20; Aggie '93, 7. 
The game was easily won by the Juniors, 
owing to the poor team work of their op- 
ponents. The score : — 

AGGIE '92. 



AE 


K 


1 R 


T B 


S H 


P 


A 


V. 


Willard, c, 7 


5 


3 


3 


2 


13 





2 


Crane, p, lb, 2b 5 


4 


3 


3 





2 


10 


1 


Field, cr, U 


1 


1 


1 


1 











Fletcher, p, lb, 5 


4 


2 


2 


4 


6 


s 


(I 


Taylor, lb, 2b, .5 


4 


2 


4 











2 


West, 3b, 6 


1 


2 





1) 


2 


1 


1 


Boynton, If, C 





3 


3 





1 








Lyman, rt, 6 


1) 


() 


(1 





1 





1 


Emerson, ss, G 


1 


1 


1 


1 








2 



Total, 





A B 




E 


E TB 


S H 


p 


A B 


Perry, 2b, 


5 




1 


1 1 


1 


3 


2 1 


Howard, c. 


5 




2 


1 1 


1 


fi 


2 2 


Curley, p, 


6 




2 


2 2 


1 


1 


12 


Bartlett, ss, 


4 
















1 


Davis, lb, 


4 







1 2 


n 


13 


2 


P.A.Smith 


3b, 4 










n 


3 





C. A. Smith 


cf, 1 




1 











3 


Staples, If, 


3 




1 


1 1 





I 





Tinoco, rf. 


3 



















Total, 


34 




7 


6 7 


3 


27 


16 9 


Innings, 


1 


2 


3 


4 5 


6 


7 


8 9 


Aggie '92, 


3 





4 


3 6 


3 





2 0-20 


Aggie '93, 


2 


1 


2 


2 








0—7 


Two-base hits- 


-Taylor, 


Davis. 


Base 


on balls— '92 3, 



'93 4. Base on hit by pitched ball— Staples. Passed 
balls— Willard 2, Howard 2. Wild pitches— By Curley 1, 
Crane 1, Fletcher I. Left on bases— '92 8, '93 5. Struck 
out— By Fletcher 6, Crane 5, Curley 5. First base on 
errors— '92 7, '93 5. Umpires— Euggles and Barton, 
Scorer— Keith. 

Wesleyan 5 ; Aggie, 3. 
Aggie was defeated by the Wesleyan 
Academy boys at Wilbraham, Saturday, by 
a score of 5 to 3. The pitching of Pulver 
was ver\' effective, holding Aggie down to 
three hits. The fielding of the Aggies was 
very loose at times and especially so in the 
fifth inning. Umpire Goodwin played the 
best game for Wesleyan. His individual 
plays prevented Aggie from scoring several 
times during the game. The score : — 



Curley, ss, 
Parker, cf, 
Paige, c, 
Ruggles, lb. 
Crane, y, 
Willard, 2b, 
Hull, 3b, 
Barton, rf, 
Davis, if, 

Total, 



Jester, lb, 
Barnum, 2b, 
Eoadoslavoff, If, 
Eist, cf , 
Montague, ss, 
Eogers, 3c, 
Sullivan, c. 
Pulver, p, 
Mason, rf. 

Total, 

Innings, I 

Wesleyan, 1 

Aggie, 1 



IE SB PC 



31 

WESLEYAN. 



24 15 



A B 

4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
1 



IB S E 
1 1 



PO 

9 

2 

1 



1 


12 

1 

1 



A 


1 
1 




15 




E 
1 



2 


1 
I 
1 




30 5 

2 3 ' 4 

1 





27 23 6 

7 8 9 

0—5 

1 1 0—3 



Euns earned— Aggie 0, Wesleyan 0. Struck out— Crane 
5, Pulver 12. First base on errors — Aggie 4, Wesleyan 
4. Three-base hit^Eoadoslavoff. Wild pitch— Crane. 
Passed balls — Sullivan 2, Petty 2. Umpires — Lehnert, 
M. A. C. ; Goodwin, Wesleyan. Scorers— Eogers, M. A. 
C. '92; Pratt, Wesleyan. 



COLLEGE NOTES AND EXCHANGES. 

Howard University is to have a chair of 
vocal music. 

Field day was held in a large number of 
Eastern colleges last week. 

Rutgers graduates forty-one men this 
year, two of whom are specials. 

The Princeton Freshmen have passed 
resolutions against hazing nest year. 

Tlie annual field meeting of the Dart- 
mouth Athletic Association was held May 
19th. 

Stagg, the Yale pitcher, will have charge 
of the department of Physical Culture at 
Chicago University. 



129 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Prof. E. M. Peare of BowdoiQ has been 
called to a professorship in the Leland 
Stanford University. 

Arrangements are being made for the 
removal of the New Hampshire Agricul- 
tural College to Durham. 

The students of Wellesley have petitioned 
the managers of the World's Fair to have 
the fair closed on Sundays. 
. The Yale Seniors by a unanimous vote 
have favored the adoption of the Oxford 
cap and gown at commencement. 

Advice to Freshmen — Honor thy profes- 
sor in the days of thy youth that thou mayst 
be solid before thy Senior year. — Ex. 

Dr. Jordan, President of the Leland 
Stanford University, will receive the largest 
salary that is given to any college president 
in America. 

Four new buildings, twelve instructors 
and an increase of eighty-four students is 
the showing for Brown University during 
the last two years. 

The University of Pennsylvania has 
elected Dr. Roland P. Falkner as professor 
of statistics. This is the first University 
to establish such a chair. 

Every class that has graduated at Dart- 
mouth within the last fifty years is making 
preparations for a reunion. at Hanover dur- 
ing the coming commencement. 

Brown's pitcher, Woodcock, is to play 
with the Boston League Club. He will 
play with Brown until commencement when 
he will begin his service with the Bostons. 

At the Junior target practice at the Del- 
aware State College, Lieutenant Grant 
made twentj'-three bulls-eyes out of a pos- 
sible twenty-five at a range of three hun- 
dred yards. 

Yale has received $15,000, for the pur- 
pose of building and furnishing a new reci- 
tation hall, or to endow a professorship in 
the academic department, as the trustees 
may see fit. 

Prof. Jessup of Dartmouth in his recently 
VQ\\8Qdi Flora and Fauna of Hanover, states 
that 1161 species of flora are found native 
of that place. Of animals he catalogues 
50 mammals, 191 birds, 15 reptiles, 20 
batrachians, and 24 kinds of fish. 

Two distinguishing features of which 
University of Minnesota students are 
proud are the large number of students 
who find it possible to work their way 
without sacrificing tlieir social position, and 
the confidence reposed in the students by 
the faculty. The only rule for conduct is, 
"Behave like ladies and gentlemen." 



The graduate students of Johns Hopkins 
are forming an organization to be known 
as the Student's Association. Its object 
is to cultivate closer fraternal relations 
between graduates, students and similar 
organizations abroad, to establish an inter- 
national student's magazine, and to co- 
operate the world over in University 
Extension work. 

The Yale catalogue estimates the ex- 
penses of students at that institution under 
three classes : lowest $355, average $630, 
very liberal $2156. All these include $125 
for tuition. The opportunities for earning 
money at Yale are very many. Of these 
private tutoring is by no means the least. 
Taking the whole undergraduate depart- 
ment it amounts to thousands of dollars. 
One man in the present Senior class has 
earned $2156 by private tutoring. — College 
Man. 

A UNIVERSAL RULE. 

There's a rule which they tell me for tennis was 

made, 
But applies just as well to all games that are 

played, 
In the letter in some, in the spirit in all ; 
Keep your feet on the ground and your eyes on 

the ball. 

But not to games only this motto applies, 
To all of life's problems a key it supplies ; 
And the soundest advice is whatever befall. 
Keep your feet on the ground and your eyes on 
the ball. 

The ball is the prize which you're striving to win. 
The ground is your capital— talents or tin ; 
And the gate to success has inscribed on the wall : 
Keep your feet on the ground and your eyes on 
the ball. 

— Exchange. 



GEOMETRY. 

Sing a song of angles. 

Sing it loud and clear. 
All the kiud s of angles 

That we study here. 
Right angles and triangles 

Floating in the air, 
Angles on the blackboard. 

Angles everywhere. 

Sing a song of angle worms — 

Pretty pebbly brook, 
Little fishes swimming 

In some shady nook. 
Though I may sing of angles 

In geometric terms. 
You may be sure that in my heart 

I sing of angle worms. 



WHICH? 

He handed her an ice, and took 
Two kisses from a waiter. 
She said, "Not any, thank you, now; 
Perhaps I'll take one later." 

— Exchange. 






KELLOGG'S BLOCK, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Office Hours, 9 to 12 a. m., 1-30 to 5 p. m. 



aS'Ether and Nitrous Oxide Gas administered wlaen 
desired. 



A.T THE! 



>MHEI|ST CASH SHOE STOI[E, 

You can get the most for your money. 
BOOTS AND SHOES, RUBBERS, OVER- 
SHOES, SLIPPERS, TRUNKS, 
AND BAGS. 



REPAIRING NEATLY DONE. 



HAWES & STINSON, 

CASH ROW, AMHERST, MASS. 



AMHERST HOUSE 



LIYERY, FEED JND SALE SABLE. 



T, L PAIGE, Prop'R 



HACKS TO AND FROM ALL TRAINS, OM- 
NIBUSES, HACKS, DOUBLE AND 
SINGLE TEAMS FURNISHED 
AT SHORT NOTICE. 
CAREFUL DRIVERS, FAIR PRICES. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



Sheet Music, 



Music IBookfc 



Strings 

FOR THE VIOLIN, BANJO, GUITAR, 

Cushman's Music Store, 



I7OWES ^ I^ELLOGG, 



DEALEnS IN 



-.^IVCHBRST. 



J, M, WAITE k SON, . 



AND DEAUiUS IN 



Hats, Caps, Furs, Trunks, BaES, Furnisliii Goods, 

Latest Styles in Fiiruishings. Agent for 

Knox's and Youman's. Hats. Sole 

Agent for Pittsfield 

Laundry. 

Hats Repaired. Furs Renovated. 

Gire us a call before purcliasiiig. 
JVO. 5 ylKENIX KOWj A.31HES,^T, MASS. 



%m\itx^i Mouse, 



o 

AMHERST, MASS. 



The undersigned is pleased to ainiounce 
to liis former patrons and otbers desiring 
Game Spreads or Dinners, that he is alwaj's 
prepared to accomodate (at short notice) 
large or small parties. 

Ample dining room capacity for 200 peo- 
ple. 

LORENZO^ CHASE, Prop'R. 

..^DENTISTS. ,5).. 

C. S. GABIES, D. D. S. 

T. G. HUNTING rON^, D. D. S. 

CUTLER'S BLOCK, AMHERST, MASS. 



OFFICE HOURS: 
9 A.. ]vn. TO 5 I». :^/L. 

Etlier and Nitrons Oxiile administered when 
desired. 



^■STUDEpg SUPPLIES--!^ 

FANCY GROCERIES, CROCKERY, CIGARS, 

CIGARETTES, TOBACCO, FRUITS 

AND CONFECTIONERY, 

MIQP mom RIID KBl^OSEllB OIL, 

SDoors South of I'. O., - AMBERST, MASS. 

EDWIN NELSON, 

Books and Stationery, 

Next door to Pest Office, 
AMHERST, MASS. 



WOOD'S HOUSE 

Ra.zoi's Honed and Shears Sharpened at 
short notice. 

FEUnD, ^.A-KTETUF, 

AMHERST, MASS. 



PHOTOGRAPHS. 

The place to go for photographs is at 

* I^bnpield's Studio m 

ON 

AMITY ST., AMHERST. MASS. 

TINTYPES TAKEN. 

CABINETS at $g.OO, .$S..'iO auil $3.00 piv dos. 

All worlv warranted lirst class and .sati.sfac- 
tory. Sitting's made withont regard to weather. 
Instantaneous process nsed. , 

C. R. KENFIELD, 

PHOTOGRAPHER. 



H. 0. PP 



H 



Hai)t TalloF, 



A-lVCIiERST, 



3VC.A.SS. 



J. L. LOV^ELL, 

DRY PLATES, COMPOUND DEVELOPER 
AND SENSITIZED PAPER, READY 

FOR USE. 



PRINTING FOR AMATEURS 

Done in the best manner. 



AMHERST, MASS. 



(sl. fl. FJawson, 



DEALEK IN 



FINE POCKET CUTLERY, SILVER AND 

PLATED WARE. OPTICAL GOODS 

CANES, SPORTING AND 

FANCY GOODS, 

Gold Pens, Fine Stationery 



REPARING NEATLY and PROMPTLY DONE. 



AMHERST, MASS. 



DwiGHrp GQOOI^E, 



BILLIARD AND POOL 



F.A.PLI_.Ort, 



3 Ffuvnix Jiow (Tfjy-strrirsjf 
AMHERST, MASS, 



Massachusetts Agricultural College, 




A-inliersst, IMa^sss. 



'^. ^.'^. ^il^^..e.^^ 




VOL. I. 



AMHERST, MASS., JUNE lo, iSgi. 



NO. 17. 



CARPENTER & lOREHOUSE, 



C, H. S4NDERS0t(i CO., 



CASH DEALERS IN 



AMHERST, 



MASS. 



Mass, Agijicultural College, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHEEST, MASS. 

We would iiifonn the friends of the college, 
and the public generally, that we are prepared 
to supply 

FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND 

SHRUBS, SMALL FRUITS AND 

PLANTS, 

true to name-, also 

eUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

all at the lowest price. 
For Trees, Plants, Slirubs, Flowers and Small 
Fruits, address, 

Prof. S, T. Maynard, 

AMHERST. MASS 



THE AMHERST 



Jf^^ 



FURNITURE /ND CARPET STORE, 



A complete line of goods suited to the students' 
wants. 

BEDSTEADS, MATTRESSES, PILLOWS, 



S TUDY DESKS AND CHAIRS , 
LOUNGES 

WINDOW SHADES, DRAPERIES, 

CARPETS, RUGS, ETC., ETC., 



.Ill i/omls Strictly Cash and at Lowest I'rices, 



K. I). MARSH, 



10 riiniM.x liow, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



PII]E 0LOTHII]0, 

Hats, Caps, Umbrellas, and Gents' 
Furnishing Goods. 



.CASH ROW, 



AMHERST. 



Sande[|soh k Thompson, 



C.\SH DEALERS IN 



Dry and Fancy Goods, 

HOSIERY, RIBBONS, [AND SMALL 
WARES OF ALL KINDS. 



AMHERST, MASS. 



BOOTS#SHOES 

FOR EVERYBODY. 



A FINE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, 
BALS. AND CONGRESS, 

A FULL LINE OF 

X?,XJBBEI?, G-OOIDS, 

I'OOT-BALL SHOES Al? LOWEST CASH PRICES. 

Repairing Done Promptly. 
T. W. SLOAN, 

» rnaiNix s,ow. 



S. J. SULLIVAN, 

OEALEK IN 

Second- Hand Clothes 

AND 

FURNITURE. 



I^Orders promptly attended to.< 
1'. O. Box, Sin AMHERST, MASS. 



WHERE DO YOU BUY YOUI^ 

Meersclianm Pipes? 
French Briar. Pipes? 
Clioice Tobacco? 
Sponges? 
Soap? 

Hair Brushes from 25 cts. np? 
Combs from 5 cts. up? 
Choice New Yorlv Confectionery? 
Shaving Mugs? 
' Shaving Soap? 
Lather Bruslies? 

Cigarettes, fresh every two weeks? 
The Best Soda in America? 
The Best Bay Rum? 
Imported Perfumes? 
Prescriptions prepared by licensed pharmacists? . 
Imported Domestic Tooth Brushes? 

If you have not obtained these necessaries at 
DEUEL'S DRUG STORE, you have begun 
wrong. Deuel's is the leading Drug Store in 
Western Mass., and keeps the largest assort- 
ment of goods at bottom prices. 



DEOEL'S DRU& STORt 



Amherst House Block, Amlierst, lass, 



HENRY ADAMS 



PHARMACIST, 



NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORT- 
ED AND DOMESTIC CIGARS, 
CIGARETTES, ETC., 
MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAK PIPES, 
FISHING TACKLE AND SPORTING GOODS, 

Metallic Cartridges for Pistols, and Sporting 
and Springfield Rittcs. 

Sunday and night calls responded to at resi- 
dence, -first door vs'est of Wood's Hotel. 



^rugs, Medicines, 

TOILET ARTICL»S, 

CONPECTIONERY, CIGARS, CIGARETTES 

AND SMOKERS' GOODS. 



I'liYSiCTANS' pitnscRiyrioNS care- 

FULTjT COMPOrrNDlSD, 



6 rnCENIX ROW. 

Order your COAK here. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



VOL. I. 



AMHERST, MASS., JUNE 10, 1891. 



No. 17 



THE OLD TWELVE POUNDERS. 

On the campus in the twilight, 
When the sun has sank to i-est, 
And the silent shades of evening 
Hover o'er earth's verdant breast, 
Stand the cannon by the drill hall 
Near the mortar pit below, 
And they seem to tell a story 
Of the days of long ago. 

See their brazen sides all furrowed 
By the battle's plunging hail ! 
Note the scars of sword and sabre 
On the caisson and the trail ! 
Grim and silent now the cannon 
Bear the marks of shot and shell 
That will ever stand as witness 
For the scenes of which they tell. 

But no longer do we find them 
'Mid the mighty battle's roar. 
For the war has long been ended 
And their fighting days are o'er ; 
At our college, they have surely 
Done their duty to the state. 
By instilling bits of knowledge 
In the weary student's pate. 

We have taken our positions 

At the order " Limber, Rear !" 

We have rammed the powder homeward. 

And have flred it without fear, 

And the captain's ringing order, 

"To dismount the piece prepare !" 

Nerved each man to do his duty, 

And of honor win his share. 

But not during drUl hour only, 
Have the cannon come in play. 
For the students often used them 
In a very different way. 
If you wish to know their story. 
And to learn what e'er is true, 
Turn the pages of the Index 
And your college days review. 



GREEK-LETTER FRATERNITIES. 

College students have always shown a 
tendency to form themselves into leagues 
or societies for their own social or literary 
benefit. In American colleges, there are 
now a class of secret bodies, called frater- 
nities, supported by students and alumni 
which have become of great and vital 
importance to the college world ; others are 
of less note but are likewise worthy of 
praise. 

These fraternities are composed of lodges 
or chapters, located at the different colleges 
and universities and generally bear a name 
composed of Greek words, from which they 
are called by non-collegians, "Greek Let- 
ter Fraternities." 



The first of these societies was estab- 
lished at the College of William and Mary 
in 1776 and bore the name of Phi Beta 
Kappa. It was of a secret nature, literary 
in character and eligible only to seniors. 
As to its origin, the real nature of its early 
existence is unknown, but supposed to 
have sprung up either from a European 
institution or a Free-mason's lodge. Its 
first chapter termed "Alpha" was created 
at Yale, from whence it spread to other 
educational institutions until finally not 
exactly fulfilling the anticipations of the 
students, it was superseded by the first real 
"Secret Fraternity." 

This occurred in 1825 and at Union Col- 
lege, N. Y., the name of the fraternity 
being "The Kappa Alpha Society." At 
first this met great opposition by the 
foundation of two other similar societies at 
the same place, the Delta Phi and Sigma 
Kappa. But in spite of all discourage- 
ments, they all survived and were the germs 
of the present fraternity system. 

In earlier days seniors alone were eligi- 
ble to membership but at the present time, 
with the exception of Yale and Dartmouth, 
all classmen are taken as members. In 
Yale all of the chapters are of Junior socie- 
ties, and at Dartmouth, although members 
are pledged even before entering the col- 
lege, they are not admitted to active mem- 
bership until their Sophomore year. 

In many of our larger colleges each of 
the classes has its various chapters, and 
thus forming numerous fraternities. As 
soon as a classman ascends to a higher 
class he is termed a member no longer but 
is styled an alumnus or honorary member. 
These class bodies are known as "open 
societies, "that is they are open to classmen 
whether members of other fraternities or 
not. 

A good idea of the extent and prosperity 
of the various college societies can be pro- 
cured from the following concise statistics, 
taken in 1885. There are to be found liv- 
ing in high rank, over eighty fraternities 
which comprise about six hundred student 
chapters, and one-fourth as many alumni 
chapters, and a total active membership of 
seventy-five thousand. 

Of the large number of societies the Beta 
Theta Pi, Delta Kappa Epsilon and Psi 
Upsilon, all formed for electioneering pur- 



poses at the outset are the most important 
and contain amongst their members such 
men as have been for the most part an 
honor to the nation. 

Agassiz, Ex-Pres. Seelye of Amherst, 
and other noted scientists are members of 
the Psi Upsilon Fraternity, and of the 
Delta Kappa Epsilon, which is the largest 
eastern fraternity. J. Q. Adams, Jr. and 
Whitelaw Reid are active members, and 
such men as Bayard Taylor, Admiral Foote 
and Gen. Burnside are Associates. 

These societies are greatly condemned 
by a great many people, and at many col- 
leges they are strictly prohibited but still 
for all this they are of great benefit to the 
student and have graduated many bishops, 
clergymen, lawyers and statesmen. 

The leading reasons for this condemna- 
tion are the bitter rivalry and feelino- 
between the different bodies for both hon- 
ors and their own subsistence, and it is 
commonly thought that many of them are 
breeding-beds of sin and wickedness, cap- 
able of ruining the student. These things 
are partially offset on the other hand, by 
the benefit derived by the members at their 
literary and social meets in the chapter 
quarters. 

The Princeton secret societies have 
always been condemned, and at one time 
it was considered a heinous crime to be a 
member, although many chapters existed 
"sub rosa," and were of high standing. 

All of these organizations were in their 
infancy intended as literary societies, but 
in later years they became stronger and 
were intended to bring the students to- 
gether socially and to control college elec- 
tions. The fraternities are not alone con- 
fined to institutions for young men, but are 
very prosperous in female schools as well. 
There are seven in this country the most 
important of which is the Kappa Kappa 
Gamma, a fraternity of half a hundred 
chapters in the several seminaries. 

The old literary societies in American 
colleges bore such names as "Erosphian," 
" Philolethean," etc., but these names are 
now used only by academies and prepara- 
tory schools. In these old halls, now of 
little or no importance, many an American 
statesman first trained his powers as an 
orator. Among these are Jas. A. Garfield, 
Sunset Cox and Gen. Lew Wallace. 



131 



AGGIE LIFE. 



The only fraternity to contine its mem- 
bers to a special class of students is the 
Phi Delta Phi which is composed entirely 
of lawyers. 

As a final statement it may be justly 

claimed that these College Fraternities fill 

a necessary and very important place in a 

student's college course. 

T. F. K. 



IVY POEM. 

H. N. LEGATE 

The river EWne rolls grandly down, 

Down to the German Sea, 
'Twixt lovely banks with ruins crown'd 

Of the things that used to be. 

There is many an ancient castle 

And many a ruined hold, 
Held in the knightly days of yore. 

By robber barons bold. 

In stern and massive grandeur 

The gray old towers arise, 
While over them tenderly twining, 

The beautiful ivy lies. 

Like a green and tender mantle, 
It encircles their ruined walls, 

And down from angle and buttress, 
In softening verdure faUs. 

"With soft and caressing fingers 
It touches the cold gray stone. 

And adds to its rugged boldness, 
A beauty all its own. 

So round our life in college. 
Let Memories tenderly twine, 

As round over the rough old stones 
Cling those of the ivy vine. 

Forgot be every jealousy. 

Forgot each petty spite ; 
Remembered only be om- joys. 

The brightness and the light. 

We meet to-day in Friendship 

And Love that time has made, 
Love that shall ever faithful prove, 
Till the last great debt is paid. 

We meet to-day to part too soon, 

And leave our college home. 
And far and wide across the world 

In various paths to roam. 

The tender ties four years have made 

We soon must tear away. 
And part to meet — when, no one knows ! 

But not for many a day. 

But let us cherish in our hearts 
These college memories sweet. 

And not forget these scenes and friends. 
Though ne'er again we meet. 



CAMPUS ORATION. 

BY WALTER C. PAIGE. 

Ladies and Gentlemen : — Undoubtedly 
many of you are unconscious of the honor 
being conferred upon you to-day. You 
are the favored few, who are to see this 
unequaled body of the country's brightest 
make their debut into the world's arena. 



We do not boast of beauty, for the only 
fair members of our class left us but a 
short time ago ; but we would call your 
attention to the progress that has been 
made in this institution and throughout the 
entire world during the last four years. 
This period has been one of most remarka- 
ble advancement. Toothpicks have become 
more abundant and are more readily eaten ; 
tutti-frutti has come into general use in 
Africa, and electricity has become so cheap 
that in Y'"ork State they feed it to convicts. 
While we do not take upon ourselves all 
the credit for this progress, yet we believe 
that our influence upon the world has been 
directly or indirectly the cause of most of it. 
It is unfortunate for the class, and also 
for me, that in a moment of recklessness 
they chose, to represent them, the Campus 
Orator whom they did. He is not a fair 
sample of the whole. When writing this 
oration I would fain have followed the 
example of my predecessors, but as they 
never existed, their example was of no 
practical value to me. If the old adage is 
true that "small beginnings make great 
endings" and the greatness of the ending 
depends upon the smallness of the begin- 
ning, in the dim future there may be ex- 
pected an oration upon this stage, that 
would cause a Bill Nye to turn green with 
envy. But it is with the present we have 
to deal, and are forced to adapt ourselves 
to the circumstances as they exist. If I 
supposed I could bring you to sympathize 
with me by producing such agonizing 
sounds as issue from the Amherst College 
Band, or our College choir I would attempt 
it even at the risk of dying in the effort. 

The point blank range of any bit that 
may be in this production is one mile, 
therefore, if you are not struck by any you 
will know that you are loo far removed, 
too near, or that none exist in it. Before 
proceeding farther it may be well to inform 
you that I am troubled somewhat with 
heart disease, and would therefore request 
you not to cause any unnecessary excite- 
ment. If any of you feel that you cannot 
endure the torture of hearing more, you 
can quietly leave and procure the oration 
in printed form in the "Aggie Life," and 
peruse it at leisure with restoratives at 
hand. Trusting that none of you believe 
in scientific foot-ball, nor have converted 
your pockets into an incubator I will pro- 
ceed with partial assurance that no violence 
will be done to me when I have finished. 

Townsmen : — As might be expected our 
stay with you has been marked by pros- 
perity within the towu. Wliile we would 



be glad to credit this progress to your 
enterprise, we cannot but feel that our 
presence has been the prime cause of it. 
Many the pleasant times we have passed 
within your borders, and it is with feelings 
of regret that we are soon to leave. We 
shall ever remember you, and will endeavor 
to pass this way many times in our walk of 
life. But when we do return do not mis- 
take us for Amherst Alumni and meet us 
at the station with open arms and un- 
receipted bills. 

Y'ou are to be congratulated upon the 
good condition in which j'our various 
departments are at the present time. Y''our 
fire company recently lowered its record 
for a mile run, by going that distance in 
fifty-eight minutes. There is nothing small 
about your police force. The militia com- 
pany looks well, but should practice sprint- 
ing more or it will get left in a retreat. 
The members of course are not used to 
army life, but in the rendezvous you have 
generously provided they are getting rap- 
idly toughened. 

After centuries of waiting you have at 
last a town hall, and probablj- after an 
equal lapse of time you will get it paid for. 
With the increased number of doctors 
you now have, the new cemetery will un- 
doubtedly prove a valuable investment. 

It would be a source of great profit for 
some one of you to establibh an agency in i 
town for the benefit of Western farmers 
and those of your feminine population who 
are of an uneasy age. With such an 
abundance of material competition would 
be close, and suitable selections could be 
easily made. 

Our desire is that the future of each and 
every one of you may abound with pros- 
perity, and with this upon our lips we would 
leave you with a hearty, — Farewell ! 

Maidenhood of Amherst : — On account 
of a natural indifference, that I have always 
exhibited towards yon, lam utterly unqual- 
ified to justly represent the spirit of the 
class upon this occasion of pai'ting. At 
this time you should be addressed with 
cheerful, comforting words, but as a result 
of the nervous shock that this appearance 
has brought upon me, I am possessed of 
that feeling, which you would probably term 
"rejected." Therefore I will not attempt 
it, but will leave it to a person more Gay 
than myself, even to the beaming poet who 
is soon to follow. Unless he believes in the 
proverb "where ignorance is bliss 'tis folly 
to be wise," he will describe to you in 
pathetic rhyme, to the tune of "North Am- 
herst, "his feelings upon this occasion. While 



AGGIE LIFE. 



132 



others may take our leaving as a uatural 
event ; you will undoubtedly mourn our 
departure, and flee more often than ever to 
your chewing gum for solace. We would 
commend to your watchful care those who 
are to succeed us. To each and every one, 
from those who are just to bloom to those 
who have been artists for many a year we 
bid a parting, — Farewell ! 

Gentlemen of the Faculty : — But few 
words have we to address to you. This 
should be taken literally and not in the 
way you use your lastly's,forty-eleveuthly's, 
in conclusion, one thought more, etc. For 
four years we have stood by you. You 
have undoubtedly enjoyed yourselves, but 
soon there will be a change for you. You 
will no longer have our aid, but will have 
to obtain your information from other 
sources. Although we have been of such 
value to you we wish no reward. What 
knowledge you have gained from us, do 
not keep it to yourself, but as freely as 
you have received so freely give to those 
■who are to succeed us. 

Often in the class room at your request 
for us to impart our knowledge we have 
promptly "given it up". We have patiently 
borne your sarcasm. We have maintained 
the record of other classes by surviving 
your regular list of antiquated jokes. If 
the laws of fiction apply to them, some 
future class may have peace, as they will 
of necessity wear out in time. Your fire 
department is in good working order as 
usual, the principles of its working being 
most forcibly illustrated in the Lab. 

Your description of the pleasures expe- 
rienced in the manipulation of zero and 
infinity has often caused us to toss about 
in restless sleep, endeavoring to lay our 
hands upon them. You have done your 
best, but your exhortation "very simple, 
gentlemen" has brought to us no comfort. 
In our endeavors to improve your methods 
of management, we have met such rebuffs 
as "Well ! What are you going to do about 
it ?" The sorrow that you have felt when 
we have bolted has been counterbalanced 
by our joy, so there now exists feelings 
fully neutralized. 

The veterinary department has accom- 
plished good results in the consideration of 
some of the more simple diseases of ani- 
mals. If a horse should be impaired with 
Purpurea haemorrhagica of the mesentery 
layer of the filamentous cartilage surround- 
ing the coffin articulation, and the respira- 
tion is seen to be affected, any of us would 
now know, that the treatment of such a 



case, unless it was complicated with a frac- 
ture of the posterior caudal bone or a dis- 
location of the right ear, would be the giv- 
ing of aconite (1 pt.), and filing the molar 
teeth. Ish not? 

Taking every thing into consideration 
we are ready to depart if you are re ady to 
let us. 

Many of your lectures would be of great 
value, to people living in tropical climes, 
during the rainy season. As we leave we 
would intrust the reading room to Prof. 
Canavan's care, and hope he will guard it 
as faithfully in the future as he has in the 
past. Hoping that you all will work as 
earnestly for the raising of your standard 
here, as you do for an increase of salary* 
we bid you, — Farewell ! 

Members of the Feeshman Class : — We 
have a word for you. Some day you are 
to fill the place we now occupy. As you 
are in a formative state as yet, it will be 
well if you heed the advice of one who has 
traversed the path before you. There is a 
great difference between the position of a 
dignified Senior and a verdant Freshman. 
This is a fact although some of you fail to 
realize it. The axiom "a straight line is 
the shortest distance between two points" 
should be your guide. The straight course 
here is four years ; the crooked one is often 
protracted, or more often shortened. 

Remember you are here to learn, not to 
teach. Cultivate the faculty of guessing, 
it will be of great value during your course, 
especially in your last year. You may 
master everything else, but psychology will 
master you, so prepare for sacrifice. 

Remember all zoological specimens car- 
ried into any class room are thankfully 
received by the instructors. The one who 
carries them in generally having special 
attention paid to him. If you desire to 
remain away from recitation, it is advisable 
to be sick, but very unwise to recover 
before dark. In your chemical course you 
will find but one authority. The books 
are all wrong, the authority on account of 
sudden variation having never written one. 
It is generally understood that the Botani- 
cal department is carried on for the benefit 
of the students and it is expected they will 
investigate thoroughly anything found 
growing there. 

Your moral obligations should be care- 
fully looked after but it is not advisable to 
be seen preying in orchards. Keep in 
mind that for the sake of your constitution 
four hours exercise on the campus should 
be taken to one of study. These simple 



rules will be found to be exceedingly valu- 
able and a faithful observance of them will 
bring you great gain. Leaving you to toil 
along your rugged way we leave you with 
a sympathetic, — Farewell ! 

Juniors : — A word to you. As we speak 
we would have you look up to us. 
Although you should have done this for 
the last three years, you have often been 
negligent of your duty. You are soon to 
be invested with the robe of senior dignity. 
Do not expect to fill it as completely as 
we have, for you are several sizes smaller. 
But we will not take this place to enum- 
erate your failings. You started behind 
us and have been kept there, notwith- 
standing your frequent attempts to sup- 
plant us. Many of you when you came 
here must have come by the way of Gaul ; 
your familiarity would indicate that such 
was the case. But for all your short-com- 
ings we freely forgive you, as we leave. 
We would commend to you the oversight 
of college, the Faculty, the Insectory and 
all those interests we have labored for, and 
with congratulations upon j'our coming 
honors we bid you, — Farewell ! 

Classmates : — For four years we have 
illumined this place. Together in mutual 
harmony have we rode along. You have 
used my horse and I have used your horse. 
But these associations must soon be ended 
and the final farewells be offered. These 
familiar scenes, which we have learned to 
love so well, will soon be lost to view. 

The Chapel where we have so often been 
hypnotized, and under its influence have 
earnestly prayed for water, the Library 
where we have spent many hours perusing 
the untold volumes of reports and statistics, 
the Lab. from whose air of mingled gases 
comes the realization of the presence of an 
awful something ; all must be left to be 
enjoyed no more. 

What changes since we first joined hands 
does a retrospect reveal. Whoever sup- 
posed the attributes of a Kaiser could be 
possessed by our youthful, sunny-haired 
member of four years ago. Even our 
country member from a Northern town has 
yielded to the civilizing influence of our 
association, and has of late successfully 
argued, at the Hub, the cause of his col- 
leagues, the people there not realizing that 
he was the wild-eyed youth who attempted, 
a few years ago, to waylay a street car. 
Most of us have developed from boys into 
men, but still we have only one Lage man 
among us. 

During our connection we have been 



133 



AGGIE LIFE. 



charitable one to the other. Often In class 
room have we sacrificed the benefits of 
close observation, and allowed others of 
our number to occupy front seats while 
we have endured the back ones. In doing 
this, strange as it may seem, it was fully 
proved that close observation and good 
recitations are antagonistic. 

It is with pride we can look back upon 
our moral record. When the pipes are 
circulated a little later you are all expected 
to be tea-totalers. We have high hopes 
for the future. Some of our number may 
become reformers, and if they do, they 
should be carefully watched by the rest of 
the class. To be of great service to their 
country is the hope of some. Our Berk- 
shire representative, observing a degenera- 
tion of things out his way, has ably pre- 
sented the matter before us in the class 
room, and has expressed his determination 
to do all he can towards the repopulation 
of the Berkshire Hills. Others are to take 
the light they have here received and 
carry it to the heathen nations of the earth. 
Great joy will be Felt when these darken- 
ed Shores are illumined. While we may 
reflect on the past, may prospect upon the 
future, we are to-day gathered here to es- 
pecially consider the present. Our path 
which for four years has been one is soon to 
divide. Before us lies life with all its op- 
portunities, and into the battle we are sure 
to plunge. Whether we are to travel along 
the high-road of prosperity, the lowlier walk 
of plenty or in the humble valleys of daily 
striving, depends wholly upon each one 
himself. In each one we can be an honor 
to ourselves aud to our country, if the im- 
pressions of virtue and manliness, which 
we have here received are faithfully car- 
ried out in practice. In our walk of life 
may we often reflect upon this time when 
we all started together and may the ties of 
friendship which now bind us close keep 
us interested in one another throughout all 
our days. And may our parting at this 
time, be the seal to a high resolve in each 
one to do his best, as we bid each other an 
affectionate, — Fsirewell ! 



BRIEF OUTLINE OF THE YOUNG 
MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIA- 
TION THE PAST YEAR. 

As in many other departments of the 
college the Y. M. C. A. can boast of the 
past year being the most active and prof- 
itable since its organization. 

During the summer Hand Books were 
issued which were sent to all those desiring 
them and also distributed freely among 



the incoming class and students of the col- 
lege. This book contains general infor- 
mation regarding the college and student 
life with a full account of the Association, 
its object and work. It was the first hand 
book ever issued but the project proved so 
successful it has now become one of the 
regular duties of the organization. The 
book published this year is now out and we 
hope much pains will be taken in distribu- 
ting them among those entering '95. It is 
found of vital importance to place this 
association before the new men as soon as 
possible. To aid in accomplishing this a 
reception was given to the Freshmen the 
first week of the Fall term. Dr. Walker 
very kindly offered his house for this pur- 
pose. The reception was well attended 
and proved not only a pleasant affair but a 
verj- effective means to bring the Young 
Men's Christian Association before the 
new men in a favorable manner. 

During the winter term the association 
experienced its first real revival since its 
organization. Mr. Sayford while travel- 
ing among the colleges visited us a few 
days and his work was accompanied with 
wonderful results. A great interest was 
manifest from the Erst and the meetings 
were attended by nearly all the college. 
As a result thirteen new men were brought 
to take a decided stand aud a much livelier 
interest awakened in the general work. 

Two years ago, through a visit bj' Mr. 
Spear, interest was started in missions. 
This has steadily grown and there is now a 
well organized missionary committee. In 
the Fall term $60.00 was raised to sup- 
port a native in the Theological School in 
Japan. Having some visible definite pur- 
pose rather than putting so small a sum in- 
to a general fund, and receiving occasion- 
ally letters from this student it has served 
well to keep up the enthusiasm in mission- 
ary work. 

The association has been well represent- 
ed at the various conventions held, having 
sent three delegates to the New England 
conference held at Williamstown and two 
to the International Student volunteer 
movement convention held iu Cleveland, 
Ohio. Last summer a tent was hired at 
Northfield and several of our members en- 
joyed most of the meetings. It is hoped 
this year a much larger number will be 
able to attend. 

The prayer meetings held twice a week 
have been enthusiastic and the Bible class 
conducted Sunday mornings by Prof. Mills 
is exceedingly interesting and instructive. 

But let us remember that even though this 



has been an unusually successful year we 
have only kept pace with the general ad- 
vance of the college, and that as we grow 
stronger more is expected of us, and thus 
each coming year must be more prosperous 
than its precedent. 



BACCALAUREATE SERMON. 

Prof. C. S. Walker delivered the bacca- 
laureate sermon, Sunday, June 7th, taking 
for his text, 1 Tim. 6 : 10. " The love of 
money is the root of all kinds of evil," and 
for his theme ; Love of money, the Basis 
of Plutocracy. 

After defining money and analyzing the 
love of money, distinguishing the first from 
commodities and illustrating the power of 
the second as a motive infiuencing the indi- 
vidual, the speaker developed the idea that 
money is at best but a tool, iu many cases 
a very poor tool. As a tool it may be 
improved. Money is also a symbol : it 
symbolizes service in society. Money 
which does not adequately represent ser- 
nce to society is really counterfeit and in 
the end will be rejected by mankind. Any 
further improvement of money as an instru- 
ment and symbol necessitates a radical 
change of human nature. This change is 
not impossible, nor with time improbable, 
for science has proved that all nature con- 
stantly changes and human nature most of 
all. Destroy the individual love of money 
in the breasts of the multitude, the money 
king is dethroned and plutocracy becomes 
impossible. 

The sermon closed with the following 
address to the class of '91 : — 

Gentlemen of the graduating class : You 
leave these walls at an opportune time. The 
world has need of you. The first question, 
however, that will confront you will be the 
question of finance. In framing your an- 
swer to this important question, remember, 
I beseech you, that the love of money is a 
root of all kinds of evil. 

In your decisions and actions be gov- 
erned by two principles: (1) Service to 
society; (2)) through service to society 
power to command the labor or product of 
labor of others, for their own good. With 
these two principles embodied, glory, hon- 
or and immortality will await you. 

From the first rid your soul of the beset- 
ting sin of the age, the love of money. For 
this beguiling motive substitute as your 
governing principle service to society. In 
seeking a position ask not, What is the sal- 
ary? Ask, What opportunity will the con- 
templated opening give you for using the 
strength of body, the power of mind and 



AGGIE LIFE. 



134 



the weight of character, acquired here, iu 
the sevvice of the Cliristian family, the 
American farmer, the Commonwealth, the 
Nation? The man who really serves his 
fellow men need not trouble himself about 
money ; those whom he serves will see that 
he has mone^' enough. Having the reality, 
you may exist without the symbol. In 
proportion as you serve your fellow men, 
will you command them, directing their 
labors and controlling the product of their 
labor. Direct their labors and control the 
product of their labors in such a manner 
that their labor and yours shall not be in 
vain, but shall accomplish much for their 
good and yours and thus will you increase 
and perpetuate your power over them. You 
may command a score of men, then a hun- 
dred, then a thousand, perhaps the whole 
nation, possibly the human race; who 
knows ? The inventor of the steam engine, 
does not he yet by his idea dominate the 
world? The inventor of printing, had he 
no power over his fellows? The steam 
engine and the printing press have proved 
wondrous tools that have left their works 
on the world. Another tool, more strong 
than printing press, or steam engine, is 
this thing called money. Its power is mag- 
ical. The query is, does it not work more 
ill than good' 

Who will improve this tool for us? Who 
will take it away entirely and give us a 
better one? Copper is better than wam- 
pum ; gold is better than silver ; the United 
States certificate, signed and sealed and 
duly authenticated for one dollar or one 
hundred millions of dollars is better than 
gold; but have we reached the ultimate? 
Steam is being superseded by electricity. 
The idol of wood, of silver and sold, has 
been dethroned and men worship the un- 
seen but real God, Almighty, Eternal, Infi- 
nite, the symbol set aside for the reality 
symbolized. Who will take away this 
thing called money and give us in its place 
the reality which it represents so imper- 
fectly? 

Do you, my young friends, live the life 
that cannot be measured by dollars, dimes, 
cents? the life that consisteth not in the 
abundance of things possessed ? the life 
that is service incarnate ? the life that is 
power in labor over the products of labor? 
the life which ig itself so full of spiritual 
might that in and of itself, without the ad- 
venturous aid of silver and gold, it cannot 
but command the labor and products of 
your fellows ? Live such a life as this and 
it will prove its own glorious reward ; you 
will be independent of the despotism of the 



Almighty Dollar, the work of this idol will 
not be branded on your forehead, and you 
will have made such a radical change in 
that part of human nature, immanent in 
your own individual being, as to have es- 
tablished a dynamic point whence must 
issue vital forces that will emanate and 
agitate, far and wide, until they shall coa- 
lesce with similar forces burstmg from oth- 
er souls and thus united, permeate human- 
ity, when shall come that new dispensation 
foreseen by the seer of Patmos, St. John, 
the divine, when men shall hunger no more, 
neither thirst any more ; when the holj' city 
shall be the marvel of the age, when streets 
shall be paved with gold, and men treading 
it beneath them shall serve one another for 
love of God and love of man — a motive 
inspired by the sight of him the Son of 
Man, who though rich for our sakes became 
poor that we through his poverty might at- 
tain unto the true riches, treasures laid up 
where neither moth nor rust doth corrupt 
and where theives do not break through 
nor steal, an inheritance incorruptable, un- 
defiled that fadeth not away. 



FRESHMAN NIGHT. 

According to time-honored custom, Fri- 
day night was celebrated by the class of 
Ninety-four as the time when they did away 
with all things appertaining to Freshmen 
and came out as full fledged Sophomores. 
It is the aim of each class to have some- 
thing a little better than the i^revious one, 
for it is said that according to the success 
of Freshman Night, so will be the success 
of the future Sophomore class. 

To say the least the Freshmen had a very 
pleasant and successful class celebration. 
One of the principal features of former 
Freshman nights, namely the cannon and 
rifles, were however missing, the Com- 
mandant evidently thinking that there 
would be enough noise without the use of 
the United States property. Consequently 
the military property was called in. 

Permission was granted to the class to 
ring the chapel bell until eleven o'clock, 
three hours being deemed sufficient to work 
off the surplus energy and enthusiasm of 
the bell ringers, as well as making night 
hideous for the surroundmg country. As 
the bell scarcely ceased clanging from eight 
o'clock until eleven, it is safe to say that 
the Freshmen took full beueflt of this 
privilege. The illuminations and fire-works, 
constituting by far the best part of the 
celebration, were some of the finest we had 
ever seen, and it can be said in praise of 
the Freshmen that this mode of celebrating 



was far more pleasing and satisfactory 
than it could have been if simply noise and 
fire were aimed after. The display was 
very fine and reflects credit on the class. 

The Freshman banquet was served down 
town at midnight, and of course was hugely 
enjoyed by all present. After the banquet 
the class returned to the campus where in 
the early hours of morning the bonfire was 
lighted. This, together with the inevitable 
yelling, kept the class busy until daybreak. 

Taken as a whole. Freshman night 
passed very pleasantly to all concerned. 
Much of the anticipated resistance from 
the Sophomores failed to come, and it may 
be said of them that they behaved iu a very 
gentlemanly manner. To be sure there 
must be some clashing but there was less 
of it than there has been before for years. 

The Juniors were highly pleased with the 
bountiful spread with which they were 
treated by the Freshmen. If there were 
an^' doubt to the matter, one need only 
have looked into the door of a certain room, 
in North College, and he would have had 
ample proof that the Juniors were enjoying 
themselves. Thus was the night passed 
and as daybreak approached the campus 
gradual!}' became cleared and the early 
morning signified that Freshman night and 
Freshman year for the class of Ninety-four 
was at an end. 



ALUMNI NOTES. 

Edward Morris Dyer, '72, died March 
17, 1891. In August, 1868, he entered 
the Blassachusetts Agricultural College, 
then under the presidency of Col. W. S. 
Clark. During his four years in Amherst 
he maintained a high average in scholar- 
ship. He was an enthusiast in the latest 
theories and speculations in agriculture, 
an earnest seeker for the easier methods 
of soil-culture, a worker in all schemes for 
the social and literary advantage of the 
students and also a consistent leader in the 
social and religious endeavors of the Col- 
lege Christian Union, of which he was one 
of the early members. He was the poet of 
the class of '72. His odes and serio-comic 
poems will long be remembered by the 
earlier members of the College. He was 
pre-eminently a loyal man — to his class, to 
his College, and to his State. 

D. W. Dickinson '90, who is attending 
a dental college at Brockton, is now at 
home for the Commencement week. 

Cards are out announcing the marriage 
of Edgar Gregory '90, and Miss Flora 
Dell Stebbins of Amherst. 

Messrs. E. E. Knapp, H. C. Bliss and 
F. F. Noyes, all of '88, are in town during 
commencement. 



135 



AGGIE LIFE. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Published Fortniglitly by the Students of the 
Mass. Agricultural College. 

Terms $1,00 per year, in advance. Single copies, 10c. 

Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 



BOAJt,D Of- EDITORS : 

II. E. CRANE, '92, Editor-in-Chief, 
G. B. WILLARD, '92, Business Manager, 
G. E. TAYLOR, '92, E. H. SMITH, '93, 

G. F. CURLEY, '93, B. SEDGWICK, '93, 

C. F. WALKER, '94. 



Address all communications to the Business Manager. 



t^^^tUTt^ "Ih \.\C^t*51\i^t^ ^^N^V'^t^^. 



One more year of college life has faded 
away and Commeacemeot with its crowded 
audiences, public speaking, banquets and 
receptions is at hand. To some of our 
number, it is indeed a Commencement in 
the fullest sense of the word. It makes 
the successful completion of four long 
years of study, during which they have 
striven to obtain that knowledge that would 
fit them for life. It is a Coinmeucement 
of a new era in their experience, when they 
must go forth and alone win fame and 
honor for their Alma Mater. To these we 
would say as a parting admonition, do not 
forget your college paper. When in future 
years, you are surrounded by the troubles 
and cares of the business world, remember 
that Aggie Life is with you in both 
success and misfortune, and her columns 
are always open for your communications. 



With the last issue of the Life for this 

collegiate year, the Editors wish to thank 

the students and our friends for the support 

they have given us, during the short term 

that the management of the paper has been 

in our hands. We have tried to keep up 

the reputation left us by the former board 

and we trust, can safely say we have done 

so. Next year we hope to introduce new 

features into the paper, which will make it 

still more a credit to the college. We have 

now a circulation of four hundred copies ; 

next year it must be five hundred. The 

alumni as yet have contributed but little in 

the literary line, but they have supported 

us well financially, as the subscription list 

shows. We remind the outgoing class of 

their obligation to the paper, and suggest 

that they deposit their subscription for the 

next volume before they leave their Alma 

Mater. Hoping to hear from all the old 

friends, and many new ones next fall, we 

wish you all a happy vacation. 



The failure of the cadets to take part in 
the parade Memorial day is to be regretted. 
Some time previous to the holiday, so many 
men expressed their willingness to take 
part in the exercises that the local G. A. 
R. Post had the fact publicly announced 
in their program and made arrangements 
for their entertainment. Last year two 
companies accepted the invitation and all 
were satisfied that their time was well 
spent. The military department of the 
college is something of which we should 
not be ashamed, and such an opportunity 
to show the public what we have accom- 
plished in that direction should not be 
overlooked ; moreover, this is a state institu- 
tion, and most fittingly could its students 
have aided in celebrating a public holiday. 
But this is not the chief reason why the 
cadets should have participated iu the 
exercises. It is the respect and reverence 
every young man should feel for his 
country's dead. In what better way can 
we show this reverence, than by joining 
the great army of soldiers and citizens who 
go on Memorial day to decorate the graves 
of those who gave their lives that we might 
live in a country of peace and prosperity. 



It would seem from the exhibition of 
spirit both last year and this, that class day 
exercises have become an established part 
of the Commencement programme. This 
is something of which the students had ought 
to be proud. And as it seems to be a matter 
of pride for some classes to do everything in 
their power to avoid copying an example 
set by the previous class, we should all 
feel grateful that '91 has not shown any 
such unjust spirit in this instance, not, 
however, diminishing our gratitude to '90 
for the strenuous efforts put forth by its 
members in this line. //These exercises are 
about the last performed here by those 
graduating, as a class. For the last time, 
as members of the college they bring 
together reminiscences of the last four 
years, in verse and in song. All the build- 
ings which they have frequented for so 
many months, all the spots which they 
learned toloVe,are unwillingly bidden fare- 
well. The place resounds for the last time 
with the echoes of their beloved class yell. 
In this manner, by class day exercises, 
the true position of the graduating class is 
more clearly seen. The realization that 
those faces will be absent the coming year, 
that their persons will no longer be seen 
on the campus, at drill or mingling iu our 
sporta, is more clearly pointed out to the 
mind. These are the effects of class day 



on the remaining portion of the students. 
What feelings are produced iu the minds 
of those graduating, we can know only by 
experience. They must be, however, those 
of gratitude and loyalty to their Alma 
Mater., and must result in resolutions to 
become men, men of whom the college will 
be proud. These exercises are also a 
source of great interest to visitors. They 
come here to remain three or four days 
and are very grateful if always kept on the 
move, if the time is continually filled with 
some part of the programme. The more 
the better. So in years to come, let us 
hope that this new custom will be kept up, 
coming around to M. A. C. as often as 
Commencement presents itself to us. 
And let us resolve that we, at least, 
will do all we can to keep up the spirit in 
this direction, remembering the nobleness 
of intention with which it was instituted. 
It is for a good purpose and it is only 
fitting that the students should leave college 
with some such feelings as cannot be 
better produced than by class day exercise. 



GLEANINGS. 

— Now how about that? 

— Look out for fresh paint. 

— Tufts was unable to play here Satur- 
day. 

— J. E. Bardin '92, will return to col- 
lege next year. 

— The Senior class finished examina- 
tions May 29th. 

— J. E. Bardin, '92, spent Saturday and 
Sunday in town. 

— The military prize was divided between 
Eames and Legate. 

— F. S. Hoyt, '93, spent Sunday, May 
31st, with friends in Hadley. 

— The Senior pictures have finally ar- 
rived after considerable delay. 

— President Goodell was absent one day 
last week by reason of illness. 

— The music of the mowing machine has . 
begun to be heard in the land. 

— F. L. Arnold has moved to the Exper- 
meut Station where he is to work. 

— The Student's Handbook published by 
the Y. M. C. A. has been issued. 

— It is reported that J. B. Knight, '92, 
will not return to College next fall. 

— The College Shakespearean Club was 
photographed by Lovell last week. 

— The Athletic Association has stored 
the field day apparatus iu the basement of 
North College. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



136 



— The Hampden Couuty Harvest Club 
visit the College Tuesdaj- June 9th. 

— The guns were all turned in last week 
for inspection by order of Col. Huse. 

— The college boilers have been thor- 
oughly cleaned, repaired, and painted. 

— The battalion did not march Decora- 
tion day as it was expected they would. 

— A number of students expect to work 
on the farm during the summer vacation. 

— Prof. Mills attended the Commence- 
ment exercises at Boston University 
June 3. 

— A large number of townspeople wit- 
nessed the display of fireworks Friday 
evening. 

— Last week was Senior vacation but all 
officers were required to be on drill during 
the week. 

— C. A. Magill, '91, attended the Com- 
mencement exercises at Boston University 
last week. 

— The pictures of the base ball team, 
taken at Hartford, Conn., were received 
last week. 

— The graduating class will hold their 
banquet in Springfield, Wednesday night 
June 10th. 

— We are unable to publish all the class 
day exercises, as the paper goes to press 
earlier than usual. 

— Five or six of the Senior class have 
accepted positions to work for the Gypsy 
Moth Commission. 

— Rev. J. P. Hoyt of Cheshire, Conn., 
father of F. S. Hoyt, '93, preached in the 
first church June 7th. 

— W. J. Goldthwaite and George Haley, 
formerly of '92, are visiting the college 
during Commencement. 

— H. N. Legate '91, has accepted a po- 
sition as assistant to the secretary of the 
State Board of Agriculture. 

— Ex-Governor Goodell of New Hamp- 
shire and Dean of the Agricultui-al College, 
visited this College June 5th. 

— The Seniors were entertained on the 
evening of June 1st by their classmate, H. 
J. Field at his home in Leverett. 

— May 29, three Freshmen went to their 
botany recitation in a pouring rain while 
the rest of the class stayed away. 

— The battalion was inspected on Mon- 
day, June 1, by Col. Huse, Inspector of 
the Atlantic division of the army. 

— June 3rd, the Juniors visited the col- 
lege grove and other places in Amherst 
under the guidance of Prof. Mavnard. 



— The Seniors took the written examina- 
tion in Agriculture Saturday. The oral 
examination will occur Tuesday morning. 

— The Freshmen had their field day 
Wednesday May 27. They visited the 
Notch and explored the Garden of Eden. 

— The Cycle issued by thaD. G. K. fra- 
ternity was put on sale yesterday. The 
supplement is to be issued Wednesday 
morning. 

— The members of the band expressed 
themselves much pleased with the treat- 
ment they received at Wilbiaham on Deco- 
ration day. 

— Rev. Mr. Trask, of the Memorial 
church of Springfield preached in the 
chapel last Sunday morning. His test 
was Matt. 28 :17, "But some doubted." 

— Prof. Fernald invited the Junior class 
to his house June 2nd, to see his collection 
of insects and gained their good will by 
treating them to ice cream and cake. 

— It was hoped that the Students work- 
ing on the Gypsy Moth Commission would 
be here this week but the work is so press- 
ing that Supt. Forbush can not spare, 
them. 

— June 1, there were no recitations the 
first hour in the morning, in order to give 
the students a chance to prepare for in- 
spection, no recitations were held in the 
afternoon. 

— F. G. Stockbridge, '92, has recovered 
from an attack of measles contracted 
while at work on the Gypsy Moth Com- 
mission. He does not intend to return to 
his work there this summer. 

— At the boarding club meeting held 
Saturday night, onh' the president was 
elected, owing to a disagreement among 
the members of the club. The president 
for the fall term is W. H. Rannej-. 

— The class of '93 have elected the fol- 
lowing officers for next term ; President, 
F. S. Hoyt; vice-president, Benj. Sedg- 
wick ; secretary and treasurer, F. A.Smith ; 
historian, G.F..Curley; class captain, F. 
H. Henderson; foot ball captain, F. H. 
Henderson. 

— The Bay State Agricultural Society 
will hold an exhibition of farm machinery 
here Thursday and Friday, June 11th and 
12th. The college will be inspected and 
lectures will be given by Prof. Fernald, 
Brooks and others. Assistant Secretary 
of Agriculture Willets has been asked to 
speak Thursday evening. It promises to 
be very interesting and instructive and all 
students will be repaid for staying. 



— About half an hour after the exercises 
in the Stone chapel Sunday evening, a fire 
was discovered in the tower. The alarm 
was promptly given and the hose was 
immediately laid, but it was not needed as 
the fire was confined to the electric light 
box, and was soon extinguished with a few 
pails of water. 

— The Thomson-Houston base ball 
nine did not play our nine here on Decora- 
tion day, as was expected, because they 
could not secure another game here and 
thought they could not afford to come for 
one game. Our manager tried to secure a 
game with the Williams Freshmen but was 
unable to do so. 

— The three Fraternities and the Shakes- 
pearean Club held their annual reunion last 
night in their respective halls. Many of 
the alumni of each were present and all 
report a general good time. These occa- 
sions are always times of feasting and mer- 
riment, and last night's reunions were no 
exceptions to this rule. 



KENDALL PRIZE SPEAKING. 

MONDAY, JUNE 8, AT 8 P. M. 
Freshmen. 
ChjOiles L. Brown, 
The Capture of Quebec. 

FEAira: I. PAEtEBE, 

The New South, 

John E. Gitfoed, 
Law and Faith and Freedom, 

AETH0R C. CUETIS, 

Captain Hale and Major Andre, 
Scjihomores. 

John R. Peret, 
Against Whipping In the Navy, 
A. E. JMelendy, 
Work of a Cloudburst, 

Luther W. Sjhth, 
The Doom of Claudius and Cynthia, Thompson 

Henry P. Staples, 
College Oil-Cans, McGuire 



Anon 



Grady 



Hoar 



Depew 



Stockton 



Anon 



CAMPUS POEM. 
W. W. Gay. 
Pour years ago, you well remember boys. 

When our kind Alma Mater took us in; 
And told us of the Agi'icultural joys 
In store for us, of honors we could win. 

Showed us the •' campus," bade us enter iu 
And join her children in their sports and fun 

For four short years, you know how it has been. 
Of the defeats and of the victories won. 

Upon this little scroll we have inscribed 

Some of the incidents in simple rhyme, 
That happened on the way, when we imbibed 
So freely of the spirit of the time. 

We numbered eight and twenty; felt oui- strengtli 
More when we entered, than we did at length 
"When learned Sophs, our ardor quickly cooled 
And bid us not to boast till better schooled. 



137 



AGGIE LIFE. 



By Sophs and Juniors, we were well received, 
And we poor, simple Freshmen, just believed 
Their interest shown in us to be sincere. 
But soon their actions seemed so very queer. 
They entertained us well, told us to be 
Careful in joining a society. 
" Select the best one " was the cry of each ! 
"Join ours if you the loftiest heights would 

reach," 
Marks of affection they at first displayed 
Seemed so fraternal, till our choice was made : 
Then came a little coolness, then a chill. 
Such things occur at college, always will. 

One week had scarcely passed when we were told 
By a few Juniors who seemed very bold, 
That we must organize ; so organize we did, 
" Old Father Russell" was the lucky " Kid." 
His dignity and years were timely sent. 
Well fitting him for our first President. 
We all were fond of water, as you know ; 
So we just tapped the " Pond " to see it flow ; 
And Billy was made captain, for his voice 
Would make the saddest private's heart, rejoice. 

With " Father Russell " and " Billy " ahead, 
Gay, Johnson, and Mike in the rear. 

Was quite enough, so everyone said. 
To draw from a Junior a tear. 

But oh, the wild Sophs ! the bad, wicked Sophs ! 

Uninvited, very soon came, 
And stacked up our tables, bedsteads and chairs 

Without even leaving their name. 

The Sophs a rope expensive bought 

To " rope in " the new scholars ; 
But found at length what they had sought. 

Cost them at least, nine dollars. 

And that October evening. 

When " Aggie" came to see 
The Freshman class victorious, 

And Sophs in misery. 

The wild yell of the classes rang. 

The Freshmen won the day ; 
And this old hymn the poor Sophs sang : 

" I would not live alway." 

And when the cane-rush was proposed. 

The Sophs in silence stood. 
They'd had enough, and soon retired 

Not in a happy mood. 

E'er since, the cane-rush has not thriven 

And " Aggie " smiles to know. 
There's not enough of college leaven 

To raise the cane-rush dough. 

When we were kittens prone to play. 

And "Tabby" gave advice. 
When Warner in infinity 

Told us we'd catch our mice ; 
When " Sammy tried to keep our thoughts 

On plants of various hues. 
And trotted out an hundred slides 

Of microscopic views, 

When we were studying hard to learn 

Of science and of art, 
Thoughts would creep in, make our hearts burn, 

And often make us start. 

Thoughts of South Hadley and her girls. 
Of Smith's with her bright maids, 



Their winning smiles, their flowing curls. 
And the sweet words they said. 

Love and Agricultural boys, 

Go well enough together 
Out of college, on the farm. 

In the pleasant weather. 

But when in college how they clash ; 

Then what a hue and cry. 
Professor's eyes, oh how they flash, 

How words of wisdom fly 

From their wise minds out through their lips 

And wither us like fire ; 
We then wc'uld rather pick up chips ; 

Plough, rake or dig in mire. 

Than be a target for their balls ; 

They aim to hit, you know. 
And when they shoot their victim falls, 

Their score, this fact will show. 

To that North College flre we flew. 

Of course no one to blame? 
It gave to one. Jack Horner, though 

For climbing, quite a name. 

On " Freshman night" our hearts were light 

The Sophs were happy, too. 
But oft" the cannon went somewhere 

And we were rather blue. 

But from the mortar that we found, 

A monster charge we flred ; 
And the few Sophs, there seen around, 

Were very weak and tired. 

We had a big time, boys, that night. 

As you will all declare. 
Our only real grief was this. 

The cannon was not there. 

In Freshman year, if we excelled 

In anything, 'twas this ; 
We learned the college yell, and yelled ; 

And never made a miss. 

As elocutionists, 'tis said, 

We were a great success ; 
We owe it all to Jonathan ; 

Which we will now confess. 

How he would rave and elocute. 

Till we thought him insane ; 
His voice oft sounded like the kine 

A bellowing in the Lane. 

On learning's ladder then we stepped 

Upon a higher round ; 
And inquisition instruments 

For Freshmen then we found. 

Eight sturdy Freshmen we had lost, 

But felt that twenty Sophs 
Could vanquish any Freshman host 

Who gave us jests or scoff's. 
With erect form we oft were seen to pace 
The college grounds, and often 'round the town 
Were seen with damsels in their prettiest gowns. 
At flrst we looked on Oscar with some awe ; 
In whose apparel never was seen a flaw. 
Who founded Aggie Life and meaning well, 
With pride and Joy the paper tried to sell. 
To him, it seemed that "Aggie's" life was naught 
Unless each Aggie Life full ten cents brought. 
At cattle-shows as Sophs we gained renown. 



We well displayed ourselves at Belchertown. 
Around the common twice, we proudly marched 
In regimentals, with our dickeys starched, 
Bewildering simple maidens as we passed 
At whom we many college glances cast. 
We with the cattle marched, but thought it flne 
Though once we heard this shout "calves among 

the kine ! " 
Onward we marched, till Hartwell shouted: 

"Halt!" 
It was a comfort, though we had no malt. 
That turkey dinner ! never such an one 
Was ever eaten 'neath an autumn sun. 
The wish-bones gathered, we prepared to drill. 
The clouds their buckets opened and did spill 
A shower of water on each aching head ; 
We wished that we were home and well in bed. 
Our wishes were not granted, there we stood. 
Wet, helpless chickens, with no one to brood. 
We fooled around, fanned by the evening breeze, 
With merry maidens till we thought we'd freeze. 
At length we soldiers with the cattle started 
Ofi" for our homes, and with the maidens parted. 
" The girl I left behind me " then was played. 
How oft we've wished that we had longer stayed. 
We dried our clothes, and went to Hampden 

Park, 
Intending there to finish up our " lark." 
But in a snow storm had to meet and drill 
Which was for us a bitter pill. 
T'was said, the Governor gave us much praise 
Which did our military spirits raise. 
And we exultant to the opera went, 
Not by our good and anxious parents sent. 
We do not look upon that act with pride. 
The Jekyl in us drove out Mr. Hyde. 
But college Sophs, you know, grow better later ; 
Became an honor to their Alma Mater. 
We were not angels all at once, you know. 
As an occurrance that we now will show. 
Reveals the slowness of our growth of wings 
By doing many very foolish things. 
One bright and lovely morning in the spring 
When Christians off'er prayers and robins sing. 
Was found upon the campus or near by. 
Greeting the good and faithful doctor's eye. 
The doctor's chair, the pulpit and settees ; 
His indignation rising by degrees 
Until he ordered all of us to prayers 
For taking him and others unawares ; 
Playing a trick, tho' harmless, quite unfit 
For students who should ever wear the bit 
Of learning, and by it be ever led. 
Each thought it a good joke and so they said. 
And at the Chapel, full of fun and frolic. 
We twisted round like boys who have the colic. 
Waiting for medicine we knew he'd give ; 
Ready to take it, for we wished to live 
In peace with the good doctor who well meant 
And on our best advancement was intent. 
From Proverbs he a wise long chapter read, 
That touched our hearts, so every student said. 
We think that all were better for his prayer; 
He knew just what to pray,— and we were there. 
But in the Encyclopedia there is given 
Hardly enough to fit the soul for heaven ; 
But the good doctor opened it one day 
To find no text to help us on that way ; 
But from his pocket drew a Testament 
And preached from it, much to our discontent. 
Giving the students words appropriate 
To fit their souls for a more heavenly state. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



138 



We all felt guilty, and for many clays 
We mended! so the students said, our ways. 
Professor Brooks informed the boys one day 
That for a time we'd better give up play 
And give more time to tilling mother Earth, 
Assisting her in giving cereals birth. 
It was a blow to every Sophomore. 
All prayed to be delivered, and some swore. 
Such utter nonsense imported from Japan 
They could not well receive from any man. 
But they well knew 'twere better to obey. 
That disobeying orders did not pay. 
So at their work reluctantly they went. 

I No use to delay, they knew he'd not relent. 

' Some thought that squashes would be just the 
thing ; 
Some thought that early beets or beans would 

bring 
A better price ; some thought that oats or rice 
Would need less labor and bring better price. 
Each hoped by labor to obtain a crop 
And make a little money for a prop. 
After long waiting, the result was this : 
Eive score and seven dollars, giving bliss 
To twenty Sophs who took their hard-earned 

money. 
And like wise bees that hive their gathered 

honey. 
Kept it until from West Point came a call, 
Then in a hurry went and spent it all. 

Quite near the night, when Freshmen seek for 

fun, 
The wicked Sophs declined to hear their gun. 
They find the cannon and the Freshmen flocked 
Together on the campus, primed and cocked 
For battle with the Sophs if they advanced. 
They gave loud shouts and round the cannon 

danced. 
Soon as the Sophs a two-pound charge had fired 
They sought their rooms and hastily retired. 
Leaving the Freshmen to keep watch till morn. 
Of little use, for they, poor souls, were shorn 
Of all their glory by the Sophomores 
Who stole their fun, then safely locked the doors 
When "Freshmen's jSTight" arrived, to "Frank's" 

they went 
After some trusty messengers were sent 
To notify the Juniors to hold fast 
The cannon till their hour at "Frank's "was 

passed. 
Before the Juniors full possession took ; 
The Freshmen to the basement went and shook 
Out fifty feet of hose ; themselves prepared 
To drench the crafty Sophomores who dared 
To interfere with the arrangements made. 
For all their pains, they were but poorly paid 
For Sophs are always "up and dressed,"' you 

know, 
And little mercy to the Freshmen show. 
They cut the hose, the weakened Freshmen 

sighed. 
But more than this ; at length, they almost cried 
When they soon after were compelled to pay 
Some eight and forty dollars for their play. 

We take a step upon a higher round. 
Into the mysteries of Junior year, 

We'U not forget as Juniors that we found 
At times the coast was very far from clear. 

The dignity of Juniors is well known, 
In our class it was cxuite plainly shown ; 



Mustache and whiskers half concealed the face. 

And at So. Hadley we were often seen 

('Twas said in making love there we were green) 

We tried it on though, often, just the same; 

With Cupid's bow went seeking for our game. 

When off to see their cousins oft would stop 

At " Hamp." and take a little ginger-pop. 

With girls at Smith we oft would flirt a bit. 

Beneath the stately elms made love, and sit 

Until the evening shades bid us away. 

As gallant Juniors fearing nought, we'd stay. 

Juniors at Smith's and Amherst are like doves. 

Nothing affrights them as they tell their loves. 

At the expense of learning some will stay 

And often afterward have cursed the day, 

To thiuk the Smith girls with their winning looks 

Kept them from " Aggie " and unopened books. 

But so it is, has been so in the past ; 

We trust such folly will not always last. 

In time to come the Juniors may have sense 

Enough to know that life has mood and tense. 

And conjugation of the verb " to be," 

As well as " love " is a necessity. 

The East Street Parish Guild we'll not forget 

Where oft the ice cream and our lips have met. 

We look with pity on the one who misses 

What we enjoyed you know, those roasted kisses. 

How often to North Amherst we would go 

Only to see the minister you know. 

Yet we have known some foolish eyes to wander. 

About that church in prayer time over yonder. 

You well remember that loud call 
From " Williston " to play base- ball. 
You well remember too, that Chase 
Who brought upon himself disgrace. 

Who gladly disaffection caused, 
As umpire, he had better paused, 
The team gave us much discontent. 
We know not what was their intent. 
But this we know, their etiquette? 
We have notfluite forgotten yet. 

If they at " Aggie " should appear, 
They'd find us gentlemen I'm sure. 

Our Alma Mater does not rear 
Buffoons that n o one can endure. 

What a gay time we Juniors had 

At the old Bay State Fair. 
At Fitchburg, Andrews thought us sad 

And bid us wine-d up there 

His sparkling wine revived our strength. 

We drank his health in glee. 
And Fishers vineyard reached at length 

And " took " his grapery. 

We wished that we, like Reynard, had 

Been out of reach of grapes. 
They tied some of us ujj so bad 

We took on ugly shapes. 

" Go to the dogs," the party said, 

"The kennels we would see." 
We then a trip to Clinton made 

And viewed the " doggei'y." 

Such dogs we ne'er had seen before. 

Some of them we were told 
Cost Mr. Thayer, their owner, more 

Than half their weight in gold. 



Down by the ocean at " Athene " we landed, 
And took a survey of the " Hub." 

Then for a short time the party disbanded, 
Each seeking his favorite " club." 

But all of us met, at length, at the " Fair." 
The Bay State Fair, " at the Hall." 

And we saw, I am sure, everything there. 
Except baked beans and base-ball. 

The Freshmen in Juniors have always a friend 

Quite ready to serve them alway ; 
You all remember, when asked to defend 

Those I'ifles and fire woi'ks one day. 

How the jolly Juniors all gathered together, 
Sang old college songs,- 'till the break of day 

In the rush for ice cream, when we wondered 
whether 
The Seniors or Sophs would take it away. 

How the Sophs when defeated repaired to their 
quarters, 
Inviting all in but the Juniors to " beer." 
The deeds of that night, well it but little matters, 
Twelvemonths have elapsed and they've noth- 
ing to fear. 

From the Junior round on the ladder of learning. 
We took a step higher and Seniors became. 

With less of the love for fun in us burning. 
For our eyes were then fixed on honor and 
fame. 

We had a notion when we entered college 
That Junior year would leave us with much 

knowledge. 
As Seniors we should find our labors light, 
Think of the battles that we had to fight. 
Have little else to do but meditate 
And for Commencement anxiously await. 
We were mistaken though, you may be sure 
We found new trials ready, to endure 
The hardest work at " Aggie " yet undone. 
No time for rest, refreshment, or for fun. 
Too soon Noah Porter from old Yale appeared 
Was introduced to us as we had feared 
By his Psychology — that filled our bowl 
Full to the brim with Science of the Soul. 
It was a heavy dose for us to take. 
We took it without words for " Aggie's sake." 
Tha.t not enough, they introduced another, 
We thought the fire within our brain he'd 

smother. 
'Twas Gen. Walker with a dose of tea 
Of his Political Economy, 
We took that, too, it did not cure our chill 
It made us worse, as it all others will, 
And more than this, we had an earnest call 
To drink from bottles upon chapel wall. 

Our fear of Prex. and Profs, grew less and less 
Which gave us confidence, insured success. 
Our thesis waiting for us gave us pain 
For it had waited for us long in vain. 
We wrested with it till our spirits sank 
And wished that Senior year could be a blank 
Had it not been for that delightful trip. 
We all were jolly, had not had la grippe. 
That trip you well remember to West Pomt, 
How we regaled ourselves at restaurants 
We took some money with n.s in our pants 
But all we had they took for a few heans 
And just a taste of dandelion greens. 



139 



AGGIE LIFE. 



What they called chicken sonp they hrought, but 

then 
It did not have the smell or taste of hen, 
We came to this conclusion : that they dipped 
A chicken feather, quite untimely clipped, 
Into a little water, then stirring well 
Added some salt, 'twas ready then to sell 
The Major was quite rattled when he found 
That he had lost upon cars or sound 
Eight hard earned dollars, we were ill at ease 
He needed it to buy some bread and cheese. 

At Highland Falls a royal time we had 

To welcome Aggie soldiers they seemed glad 

Opened the inn, prepared a menu rare. 

Which we poor hungry Seniors did not spare. 

Such are some of the incidents, we know. 

That through our college life did flow. 

To " Aggie Campus " we must say " Good-by." 

Out on the field of life we'll pitch our tent. 

And with our Alma Mater's blessing, try 

To show the world her sons are competent 

To do good work, where'er they are sent. 



CLASS OEATION. 

THE RESPONSIBILITIES RESTING UPON 
COLLEGE GRADUATES. 

In the eyes of the world, there is a 
signii5caut distiuctiou between college 
graduates and other men. They are looked 
up to as possessed of superior wisdom and 
power, and capable of greater achieve- 
ments. More dignity in manner and con- 
versation IS expected of them. 

And why is it? Is there that in an educa- 
tion which should broaden a man's sphere 
of influence and make him a greater power 
in society ? Is he made a better man or 
stronger for life's warfare ? For aia answer, 
let us look at some of the sources of 
strength that are offered to the young man 
in college. 

Association with college mates gives 
easy address and manly bearing, and 
teaches the value of union and leadership. 
College and class relations furnish an 
excellent chance for character study. The 
study of the natural sciences is a potent 
influence in forming habits of intelligent 
observation. President Gates says that the 
wisest and happiest people in this life are 
those who see and enjoy the most in their 
every day surroundings. If a man per- 
ceives only one in a hundred of the objects 
that are reflected upon his retina, it is 
evident that he will not enjoy as much of 
the beauty about him as he who, having 
learned the signification of natural objects, 
observes fifty out of every hundred. 

Again, the completion of a course of 
study implies not only the mastery of a 
certain number of lectures or books in 
various departments of learning, but also a 
mental discipline which qualifies the grad- 



uate for higher usefulness than could 
possibly be attained without it. A man of 
ordinary common sense and mechanical 
ingenuity can rise to a certain height with- 
out a college education, bat for lack of 
scientific knowledge can go no farther. 

These are but a few of the many advan- 
tages the college man experiences, and 
shall it be said that he owes no more to 
the community than the uneducated? Is he 
not qualified to render more efficient ser- 
vice ? Shall not the state demand more of 
him than of his less fortunate brother? 
Surely he ought to live a more useful and 
happier life than if he were without that 
four years preparation. 

Opportunity implies responsibility, and 
the college graduate having enjoyed a 
full measure of opportunity, must not for- 
get the responsibilities that are restiug 
upon him. 

He is responsible to his Alma Mater. 
To her he owes hearty allegiance and life- 
long support. She has done much toward 
making him what he is. From her he has 
leceived a fortune in training, in discipline 
and in power. Let him acknowledge the 
gift, and use it in a manner befitting its 
value. It is through her graduates that a 
college influences the country. Her honor 
and good name are committed to their 
keeping. They must stand as lights in the 
world, and only as they show themselves 
faithful to the instructions she has given, 
can she accomplish the glorious work that 
has been given her to do. 

The college graduate is responsible to 
the community in which he lives. Having 
become familiar with the existing state of 
progress in science and learning, he will 
not allow his neighbors to plod along in 
the old way, but teach them the economy 
of the new. He should be a leader to the 
community in industry and progressive 
thought. 

" Knowledge is power " is a saying true 
almost to triteness, and yet we sometimes 
see college graduates who are of little use 
and without powei' in the world, simply 
because they have net applied their knowl- 
edge. Thoughts kept to one's self are 
useless. Knowledge without action is use- 
less. Applied knowledge is power. 

To the state, too, the college graduate 
owes a solemn responsibility. Through 
her fostering care the college often receives 
the financial help so necessary in enabling 
her to furnish means of iustruction. These 
advantages come to him because of her 
wise and beneficent provision. To her, 
then, should the influences of his life be 




Business is business. FRANK WOOD yrill get up 
Spreads for the Boys this -winter. Send your orders 
right along to get there first. 



BOOST'S 

Go to BLODGETT & CLAEK 
for CLOTHS or FUENISHIKG 
GOODS. 

They keep the best line and use 
the students well. 

Take your laundry to them Mon- 
day or Wednesday morning and 
you will get good work. 

BLODSETT ^ QihR^K 



JOHN MULLEN. 



-DEALER m- 



MEATS and PROVISIONS, 

VEGETABLES OE ALL KINDS IN SEASON, 

FISH AND OYSTERS, FOREIGN 

AND DOMESTIC FRUITS, 

AND CANNED 

GOODS. 

Palmer's Block, Main Street. 



E. R. BENNETT, 
Jeweler, 

Optician, 

Watchmaker. 

FINE GOODS ! LOW PRICES ! 

GOOD WORK WARRANTED. 

First Door from Post Office. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



140 



IE YOU WANT TO GET OYSTERS IN ANY 
STYLE GO TO 

E. B. ARNOLD'S 

OYSTER gfiPE, 

Students are attended at short notice. 



Open all days of the week until 12 o'clock. 
Sundays from 9 a. m. to 12-30 p. m., and from 
7 p. M. to 11 p. M. 

William's Block, Merchants' Kow. 



6 Davis Street, 



The title page of this book was drawn and engraved hy 

BOSTON, MASS. 

The various publications of Bates, Bowdoin, Colby, 
Tufts, Mass. Agricultural College, Wellesly and Tale 
have used his work. He will submit sketches and cari- 
catures for your ai^proval. 



OFFICE OF 



EDWAED A. THOMAS, 

Fii[E /^D Life I^rance pwf. 

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE^ AND TO LET. 



Office, Cooks JBlockf A.7n7ierst, 3Iass* 



GEO. GRAVES, 



DEALEK IN 



Painters' Supplies 

Personal attention given to Frescoing, Dec- 
orating and Paper Hanging, and all 
Interior and Exterior 
House Painting. 

Pleasant St,, near L. J. Spear's Stiop. 



AMHERST COLLEGE 

CO-OPERMIfE STEi LAUiBY 

and Carpet Renovavini Establisliment. 



Aggie Agent, H. M. HOWARD, '91. 



Work taken Monday delivered Wednesday. 
" " Wednesday delivered Saturday. 

S.A.TISE'A.aXIOJSr <3-XJ.A.H.A.3SrTE;E;i3. 

OFFICE AT BRINE'S. 

H. A. UTLEY, Manager. 



given. As a citizen, he must be loyal to 
her interests, not seeking of necessity any 
prominent office as the sphere of his 
activity, but remembering that the post of 
honor is tlie private station. 

The college graduate is in duty bound to 
make the most of himself in whatever 
sphere of life he is placed. Every man is 
directly accountable for all the advantages 
he receives ; upon the use made of them 
and his original endowments depends his 
success or failure. 

Classmates ! Life is before us. What- 
ever the past has been, we cannot bring it 
back. Life and the present are all that 
we call our own. With a high purpose 
and a firm resolve, and " with sympathies 
ever in the front rank of human progress," 
let us shoulder all responsibilities and with 
unstained honor richlj- endow the glorious 
symbols '91 and " M. A. C." 

W. A. B. 



ADDRESS BEFORE THE Y. M. C. A. 

The address before the Y. M. C. A. 
was delivered in the Chapel Sunday even- 
ing before a large audience, by Rev. John 
Bascomb, D.D., LL. D., of Williamstown, 
Mass. His theme was. Largeness and Lib- 
erality of thought and action. He defined 
liberality to be a disposition to thoroughly 
respect the liberty of every man in the pur- 
suit of the truth, to accept and enjoy that 
free personal activity and those variable 
conclusions which are incident to specula- 
tive and spiritual progress. It implies an 
earnest temper and has no afiBliation with 
that spirit which is simple indifference, sets 
light by diversities of opinion, and argues 
from them that all opinions are equally un- 
certain. It rejoices in freedom of inquiry 
as the means of attaining the truth, not as 
a removal of the obligation to attain it. 

This liberality is grounded in the nature 
of thought itself, whose premises must be 
given and its conclusions drawn under the 
clean, quick eye of reason. Liberality is 
also grounded in the affections. Those 
reefs that most of all break the peace of 
Christian life have beeu, and are, the rag- 
ged, inflexible edge of doctrines, left like a 
bed of rocks of some remote age, directly 
across the paths of spiritual commerce, a 
kind of Hellgate at the very entrance of 
the harbor. It should be the early achieve- 
ment of our Christian engineering to blow 
up these obstructions on which our out 
going and incoming vessels, bearing the 
gifts of God from land to land, have so 
often been wrecked. A third ground of 
liberality is that fundamental fact or law 



we term progress. Science needs to render 
its notion of evolution more elastic, to 
show its flexible quality, to see that hidden 
in the heart of things are powers of accre- 
tion and direction with which the divine 
wisdom abides ; and religion, forgetting its 
many petty tricks of supernaturalism, needs 
to rest on the universe as a living whole, 
knit together in all lower and higher uses, 
and impelled onward as the self contained 
and converging thought of God. But prog- 
ress means diversity, the rejection of all 
that is forced and rigid. The increasing 
diversity of belief is not a misfortune, but 
truth, the manifold forms and beauties it 
assumes. Liberalitj- is grounded also in 
the notion of duty, which, while it divides, 
also unites men in a marvellous way. The 
largest individuality rests back on the 
broadest social life, and the soundest soci- 
ety supports each outstanding member of 
of its own strength. 

This liberality thus grounded in the 
nature of thought, in the overflow of feel- 
ing, in the universal fact of progress, and 
in the freedom of our moral constitution is 
pre-eminently demanded in our day. 



PRESIDENT GOODELL'S ADDRESS 

TO THE SENIOR CLASS. 
Gentlemen of the Geaddating Class : 

Into each man's life there comes a 
time when there is set sharply before him 
the line dividing the thoughts and the mem- 
ories of the past from the auticpations of 
the future. 

Such a moment has come to you to-day. 
The work of pieparatiou is ended and your 
life-service for the well-being of the world 
begins. As boyhood merged into youth, 
so youth has passed into manhood and the 
fruition of your hopes seems close at hand. 
The years that lengthen out before you are 
full of uncertainty and doubt, and you can 
neither understand what they have to bring 
you, nor yet can comprehend that the deep- 
est mysteries of life are explained, and the 
deepest problems of life are solved not in 
the thinking, but in the living. 

In the scholar's dream, the old man who 
had traversed the whole range of human 
knowledge, confessed at last that the uni- 
verse still swept on beyond him vaster and 
more remote for all his struggle to master 
it, — that he had simply learned to live his 
own personal life with patience, with forti- 
tude, with trust, ^that only he who lives 
into truth finds it, and that love alone is 
immortal. 

No sitting down with folded hands — no 
wistful dreaming of the great and good 



141 



AGGIE LIFE. 



which may &e, — but simply with patience 
and with trust, performing the duties of 
each hour as they arise. Nor is this all. 
The joy of life is born out of hope and 
courage, and those possess life most fully 
who devote it to some good end. The 
worker never asks whether life is worth 
the living. The warm current of human 
love circling through his veins keeps him 
in touch with the human kind, and the good 
he does lights up his pathway with the in- 
spiration of hope and courage. Life is at 
best a conflict. Every good thing lies be- 
yond a battle-field and we must fight our 
way to it and there must be a struggle to 
enter in and possess it. If this is true in 
the physical world, it is equally true of the 
mental. The powers of the mind have to 
fight their way up to spiritual stieugth and 
development, and it is only through the 
stress and burden of the fight that they 
reach their perfect strength and vigor. 
Beauty and nobleness of character come 
only through loug struggle and continued 
effort, and the wearer of the victor's crown 
is he who truly realizes that duty is the end 
in which all truth culminates. 
Man is his own star, and the soul that can 
Render an honest and a perfect man 
Commands all light, all influence, all fate. 
Young men ! get all the joy and gladness 
out of your young lives you can and let the 
brightness of it follow you to the end of 
your days. Make happiness a duty, and 
let duty always be a happiness. Strive 
earnestly, each in his own proper sphere, 
in the spirit of old knighthood at its best, 
" for the glory of God and the relief of 

man's estate." 

So live, that each day may be to you an 
open door to a new truth and a fresh life. 
So live, that living unto truth you may find 
it, and experience the blessedness of that 
love which is immortal. 

So live, that you may take up and illus- 
trate in your own lives the words of that 
great councillor and statesman, who turn- 
ing from his dream of philosophic perfec- 
tion could leave this precious legacy to his 
children : " It is now no mastery for you, 
my children, to go to heaven, for every- 
body giveth you good counsel, everybody 
giveth you good example ; you see virtue 
rewarded, and vice punished, so that you 
are carried up to heaven by the chins ; but 
if you live in the time that no man will give 
you counsel, nor no man will give you good 
example, when you shall see virtue pun- 
ished and vice rewarded, if you will then 
stand fast and stick to God on pain of life, 
if you will be but half good, God will allow 
you for whole good." 



BATTALION 

Major, 
Adjutant, 
Quartermaster, 
Fire Marshal, 
Capt. Co. " A," 

"B," 
" "C," 
1st Lieut. Co. "A," 

" "B," 

" "C," 
2nd Lieut. Co. "A," 

" "B," 
" " " C," 

Serg't Major, 
Q. M. Serg't, 
1st Serg't, Co. "A," 

" "B," 

" "C," 
2nd Serg't, Co. "A," 
" "B," 
" "C," 
Coi-poral, Co. "A," 

" "C," 



OFFICERS. 

E. T. Clark 

H. E. Crane 

R. H. Smith 

C. S. Graham 

G. B. Willard 

"W. I. Boynton 

Elliott Rogers 

G. E. Taylor 

H. B. Emerson 

E. B. Holland 

E. G. Stockbridge 

C. M. Hubbard 

J. L. Field 

Benj. Sedgwick 

E. S. Hoyt 

A. E. Melendy 

L. W. Smith 

H. D. Clark 

G. F. Curley 

J. R. Perry 

C. A. Goodrich 

E. G. Bartlett 

C. A. Smith 



— The Senior promenade occurs to-night. 
Every one should make it a point to be 
present. 

— The Class Day exercises passed off 
pleasantly yesterday afternoon, and were 
witnessed by a large audience. 

—Prof. C. S. Phelps, class of '85, will 
be married Wednesday, June 10th, to 
Miss Orra A. Tarker at South Coventry, 
Conn. 

— A large and appreciative audience 
gathered in the New Chapel Monday even- 
ing to hear the Kendall Prize speaking. 
The prizes were awarded as follows : Fresh- 
naen, 1st prize, F. I. Parker ; 2d, prize, A. 
C. Curtis. Sophomores, 1st prize, J. R. 
Ferry ; 2d prize, L. W. Smith. 



WILLIAM COLY/RD PAIjKER, 



28 School St., Room 42. 



BOSTON, 



MASS. 



M. A. C. 



NOTARY PUBLIC. 



BOSTON UNrVEBSITY 
SCHOOL OF LAW. 



E, B, DISXII]SOI]. D. D. % 



KELLOGG'S BLOCK, - - AMHERST, MASS. 



OfiSce Hours, 9 to 12 a. m., 1-30 to 5 p. m. 



4Sg»Ether and Nitrous Oxide Gas administered when 
desired. 



A.T TUB 



jMl^ CASH SHOE STOI[E, 

You can get tlie most for your money. 
BOOTS AND SHOES, RUBBERS, OVER- 
SHOES, SLIPPERS, TRUNKS, 
AND BAGS. 



REPAIRING NEATLY DONE. 



HAWES & STINSON, 

CASH BOW, AMHERST, MASS. 



AMHERST HOUSE 



LIVERY, FEED, /ND SALE S4BLE. 



T. L. PAIGE, Prop'r 



HACKS TO AND EROM ALL TRAINS, OM- 
NIBUSES, HACKS, DOUBLE AND 
SINGLE TEAMS FURNISHED 
AT SHORT NOTICE. 
CAREFUL DRIVERS, FAIR PRICES. 

AMSEJtST, MASS. 



Sheet Music, 



Music Books, 
Strings 

FOK THE VIOLIN, BANJO, GUITAR, 

Cushman's Music Store, 



.A.I>«HBE.ST. 



M, W AITE & SON, 



AND DEALKRS IN 



Hats, Caps, Furs, Tiiiiiks, Bags, Furiiisliiii Goods, 

Latest Styles in Furnishiugs. Ageut for 

Knox's and Youman's Hats. Sole 

Agent for Pittsfield 

Lanndrj'. 

Hats ■Repaired. Furs Renovated. 

Give lis a call before^ purchasing. 

NO. 5 vjiasNix now, AsiirEjtST, mass. 



P7OWES ^ I^BJjLOGG, 



DEALBUS IN 



>gTUDEDT'2 SUPPLIES-^ 



FANCY GROCERIES, CROCKERY, CIGARS, 

CIGARETTES, TOBACCO, FRUITS 

AND CONFECTIONERY, 

M1]QP GOODS ftl^D KE^OSEI^E OIL, 

SDoors Soiitli. of r. O., - AMHERST, MASS. 



EDWIN NELSON, 

Books and Stationery, 

Next door to Post Office, 
AMHERST, MASS. 



^mlr^rst %Qmt, 



o 

AMHERST, MASS. 



The imdersigne<l is pleased to announce 
to his former patrons and others desiring 
Game Spreads or Dinners, that he is always 
prepared to accomodate (at short notice) 
large or small parties. 

Ample dining room capacity for 200 peo- 
pie. 

LORENZO CHASE, Prop'R. . 



,.(. DENTISTS. $).. 

C. S. GA'IES, D. D. S. 

T. G. HUNTING TON, D. D. S. 

CUTLEJt'S BTAtCIC, AMHERST, MASS. 



OFFICE HOUES : 
9 A.. ]VE. TO 5 I>. IS/C. 

Etlier and Nitrons Oxide .administered when 
desired. 



WOOD'S HOUSE 

Razors Honed and Shears Sharpened at 
short notice. 

I^EB,I3. :F.A.3SrEXJF, 

AMHEEST, MASS. 



H. 0. PEfigE 



piercH Tailor, 



.A-aVEHEE-ST, 



3S4:-A.SS. 



PHOTOGRAPHS. 

The place to go for photographs is at 

® }(enpibld's S^pudio ?§ 

OS 

AMITY ST., AMHERST, MASS. 

TINTYPES TAKEN. 

CABINETS at IgS.OO, $2. HO and $3.00 per <loz. 

All work warranted first class and satisfac- 
tory. - Sittings made without regard to weather. 
Instantaneous process used. 

O. R. KENFFELD, 

PHOTOGRAPHER. 



J. L. LOV^ELL, 

'^PHOTOSpPHEfJ.E^ 

DRY PLATES, COMPOITND DEVELOPER 

AND SENSITIZED PAPER, READY 

FOR USE. 



PRINTING FOR AMATEURS 

Done in tlie best manner. 



AMltERST, MASS. 



el. p. FJaWSON, 



DEALER Ef 



WfiTKHEg, 0LO0KS, JEWELRY 

FINE POCKET CUTLESY, SILVER AND 

PLATED WARE. OPTICAL GOODS 

CANES, SPORTING AND 

FANCY GOODS, 

Gold Pens, Fine Stationery 



REPARING NEATLY and PROMPTLY DONE. 



AMHERST, MASS. 



DWIGHT CQOOI^B, 



BILLIARD AND POOL 



F.A.PLI_.OR„ 



3 jPhfenioe Row (Up-fitnirs)f 
AMHERST, MASS, 



Massachusetts Agricultural College, 




i\.mliei*!st, IM^iss. 



(3 ,>i^ . }- Si.r^..s^oMc^ 




AMHERST, MASS., SEPTEMBER i6, 1891. 



NO. I. 



• PRINTERS,* 



AMHERST, 



MASS. 



MASS, AGRICULTURylL COLLEGE, 

Botanical Department, 

AMHERST, MASS. 

We would inform the friends of the college, and the 
public generally, that we are prepared to supply 
FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES AND SHRUBS, 
SMALL ERUITS AND PLANTS, 

true to name, also 

CUT ELOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

all at the lowest pi'ice. 

For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and Small Fruits, address. 

Prof. S. T. Maynard, 

AMHERST. MASS. 



THE AlllllEliST 

FUpup }m CAR 



D 



Dm 



A complete line of goods suited to the students' wants. 

BEDSTEADS, MATTRESSES, _F2LL0WS ,_yrUDY 
DESKS AND CHAIRS, LOUNGES. 

WINDOW SHADES, DRAPERIES, 

CARPETS, RUGS, ETC., ETC. 



C, H. SANDERSOI(& CO, 

CASH DHIALEES IN 

FINE CLOTHING. 

Hats, Caps, Umbrellas, and Gents' 
Furnishing Goods, 



CASH ROW, 



AMHERST. 



S/NDE[|soft k lmm{}\ 



CASH DEALERS IN 



DRY AiND FANCY GOODS, 

HOSIERY, RIBBONS, AND SMALL 
WARES OF ALL KINDS. 



AMHERST, 



MASS. 



BOOTS AND SHOKS 

FOE EVERYBODY. 



A FINE EINE OP STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A EULL LINE OF 

IK-CTBEESS 0-003DS. 

FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



I?.EE>A.IIR,IKrC3- laOISriE OPK.OIvrFTX.'"^. 



All Croods STRICTLY CASH and at 
LOWEST PE,ICES. ■ 

E. 13. JVTARSH, 



10 PHCENIX ROW, 



AMHERST. MASS. 



T. W. SLOAN, 

3 I'HOSNIX MOtr. 



J, M, WAITE & SON, 
HATTERS .\ND FURRIERS, 

AND DEALERS IN 

HASS, CAPS, FURS, TRUNKS, BAGS, FURNISHING GOODS, 

Latest Stj'Ies ill Fuviaishings. Agent for Knox's 
and Youman's Hats. Sole Agent ■ for Pittsfield 
Lauudrj'. 

Hats Repaired, Furs Renovated. 

Give us a call before- purchasing'. 

jv^o. 5 rJsasNix now, - ammjemst, mass. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



VOL. TI. 



AMHERST, MASS., SEPTEMBER 16, 1891. 



No. I 



Published Fortnightly by the Students of the Mass. 
Agricultural College. 



Terms $1,00 per year, in advance. 



Single copies, lOo. 



Entered at the Post Office as second-class mail matter. 



BOAMD O^ EJOIXOnS: 

JI. B. CRANE, '92, Editor-in-Chief, 
G. B. WILLAED, '92, Business Manager, 
G. E. TAYLOR, '92, E. H. SMITIT, '92, 

G. JF. CUELEY, '93, B. SEDGWICK, '93, 

C. V. WALB3;R, '94. 

Please address all communications to the Business Manager. 



t^^^tUTt^ IJ. WQltVitJMa^^ ?^\mt?.S.. 



We take pleasure in presenting to you the first 
number of the second volunae of Aggie Life. The 
contemplated change has at last arrived and we hope 
that it will prove satisfactory to all. After a pros- 
perous year and a long vacation we return full of 
"Life" and enthusiasm ready to make our colleo-e 
paper rank with those of other colleges, and we 
would respectfully ask the hearty co-operation of 
all alumni and students. As formerly, we send the 
first issue to all former subscribers and eschano'es 
expecting a renewal. In our next issue we shall 
start an exchange column and we hope that we shall 
be favored with even more exchanges than we have 
bad in the past. 



The foot-ball season is at hand, and the candi- 
dates are practicing daily under the directions of 
the two captains. Never before have so many 
candidates appeared for practice, and never has the 
training been carried on so systematically. With 
competition comes the fight for supremacy between 
individual players, and we can truly say that this 
year there is considerable competition, and a man 



will obtain a position on the team only after hard 
and careful training. Every man is required to 
take a shower bath after every practice game; and 
theoretical iustrnction is given by the captain with 
blackboard sketches. Of course it is yet too early 
for us to predict as to our success this year, but 
with steady practice and careful training we may 
reasonably expect a fairly successful season. 



The young men that have just entered upon their 
college couise should at once become acquainted 
with the Young Men's Christian Association. The 
various departments of the college offer to yon great 
advantages for mental improvement, but aside from 
this you should also look after j-our spiritual culture. 
The Young Men's Christian Association offers an 
opportunity for this growth, and a substitute for the 
spiritual influences that surrounded you in the 
homes from which you have come. This spirit- 
ual culture combined whith the mental power will 
cause the upbuilding of a strong character. We 
must remember that the first friends and associations 
formed in college have a great influence on our after 
life. The first term of the college course may be 
the pivotal point of your life. To all new students, 
the Young Men's Christian Association extends a 
cordial welcome, and an earnest invitation to join 
its ranks. 



At the commencement of the college year can 
not each student with profit make a careful self- 
inspection, and see if thereby he does not find 
that he is unconsciously breaking the eighth com- 
mandment. The hour assigned to a recitation or 
lecture belongs to each indivinual student who 
attends, and in consequence of this ownership, he 
is entitled to all that can be obtained from the 
lecture or recitation of that hour. If those students 
whose interest is nOt aroused by the subject under 
discussion, whisper, rattle papers, or otherwise dis- 



AGGIE LIFE. 



tract the attention of such members of the class who 
are interested and who do wish to obtain the full 
benefit of the recitation or lecture, then such students 
are literally robbing the other members of the class 
of their lawful rights in the class room ; while on 
the other hand, by paying careful attention, even if 
the subject is distasteful to him at first, a student 
may develope interest in it, which may result at 
some future time in being of gjeat practical use to 
him. 



On our return to college Sept. 2, we were any- 
thing but agreeably surprised to hear of President 
Goodell's departure for Europe. Since last Janu- ■ 
ary, however, everyone clearly saw that he was ' 
physically unable to perform his accustomed duties 
which altogether occupy a great deal of time and 
thought. So that, while his absence is to be daily 
noticed and regretted, all bow in submission, know- 
ing that only absolute necessity could tear him away ■ 
from the college of bis heart. Meanwhile, Profes- 
sor Feruald is acting president and librarian, which 
together with his regular duties, makes his time ] 
very fully occupied. But our knowledge of the ; 
professor compels us to place our utmost confidence ', 
in his abilities, and the respect which is due him 
from the students will certainly demand our cooper- 
ation with him in his labors. The date of President 
Goodell's return cannot be definitely fixed, but 
being under the influence of Europe's invigorating 
air through the autumn months, he hopes to be with | 
us l)y January 1. At all events, our hearts are i 
with him in his travels, and all earnestly hope that '• 
he will soon recover his health, and be permitted to ' 
return once again to his duties. i 



cellences of the college itself. The fact that the 
Freshman class if not up to the average in point of 
numbers would seem at first to indicate that the 
new standard was not as successful as the old, es- 
pecially vdien we learn that a large number of stu- 
dents were debarred from entrance, that could easi- 
ly have entered had the standard not been changed. 
But taken from another standpoint, namely that of 
increased fitness for college work, we cannot con- 
demn the new standard of scholarship in the least. 
For this reason the entering class ought to attain a 
much higher degree of merit in college work than it 
could had it been larger but less prepared. Another 
fact, strongly showing the impetus a higher standard 
in scholarship has given, is that nearly every under- 
graduate has returned back to his studies. The 
percentage of students dropped out of their classes 
at the close of last year, has probably never been 
so small in the historj- of the college. All things 
considered, a high standard has produced excellent 
results both for the college and for the students. 



The raising of the standard in scholarship for ad- 
mission to the college, as well as for term rank, will 
we think, prove very successful in every point, not- 
withstanding some seemingly bad results. One of 
the main objects for the change was to have the 
entering classes more proficient in the preliminary 
studies. The advisability of this is apparent. 
By it a student is prevented from entering the col- 
lege before he is able to take up work of a more 
advanced nature than he has been accustomed to, 
and for which a thorough knowledge of the prelim- 
inaries is necessary. It moreover involves the ex- 



One of the great problems which are sure to 
come before the student at the beginning of a new 
term, is that of so proportioning his time that he 
may give proper attention to every duty and still 
have a surplus left over for recreation. A long 
vacation will often times have a demoralizing effect 
on a student's ability in this line, and so it happens 
that at the commencement of a new term so many 
complaints are heard of a lack of time in which to 
do the work required. Study of course requires a 
large share of the student's attention ; athletics and 
other healthful exercises must not be neglected, 
while there are couutless small but importaut mat- 
ters which are constantly claiming his time and 
thought. He is expected to frequent the library 
and improve his literary taste by reading ; he is in- 
vited to contribute to the next edition of the col- 
lege paper, or is requested to take part in the ex- 
ercises of his literary society, preparation for which 
will demand more or less time and labor. Besides 
this he is often obliged to devote a certain portion 
of his twentj'-four hours to work. Is it then any 
wonder that even the best of students sometimes 
fail in meeting all that is required of them? To ar- 
range a program for each days work requires good 
judgement and foresight equrd to mauy stations of 



AGGIE LIFE. 



business life. Experience only will enable a man 
to suceed in this respect. Now, at the commence- 
ment of this new term and year of college life, 
every student should devote himself to learning 
how to meet his requirements in the time at his dis- 
posal, remembering that knowledge of this kind 
will in many cases determine his success or failure 
in business life. 



^on'tributed. 



WHAT SHALL I DO? 
By Dr. J. B. Lindsey, '83. 

PART I. 

The Aggie Life offers us, as alumni, an oppor- 
tunity of talking with the present students of our 
Alma Mater, whenever we have a word to say, or 
suggestion to make. A few thoughts have been 
lingering in my mind for some time and I take this 
occasion to communicate them. Many of you 
during your student life have in consideration plans, 
more or less definite, as to your future emploj'ment 
after graduation, while perhaps others are in a state 
of indecision or total darkness regarding the matter. 
I think it would be an excellent idea for a few of 
you, who have the courage, to prepare yourselves 
to become instructors and eventually professors of 
Agriculture. 

"We have at present nearly fifty agricultural schools 
and colleges in the United States. Some of these 
colleges are now, if I am not mistaken, and others 
will be from time to time, in search of the right 
kind of men, for professors of Agricultural Science. 
I hold that a man to fill such a .position should 
receive a very advanced education, and I would not 
have yoa believe that after having been gradu- 
ated at M. A. C. you are sufficiently fitted to step 
directly into such a position. The progress iu 
Agricultural Science to-day is wondt'rful, and the 
man who would fully comprehend the situation as it 
is, and be in the front rank among those who are 
helping to advance it, must have a thorough train- 
ing, not only in Agricultural Science itself, but in 
the sciences so nearly akin to it. Do not however 
think that I am trying to belittle our own college. 
The fact is that while M. A. C. presents valuable 
courses of study, many of them are not suflSuiently 



advanced, and were not intended to be, to fit a man 
for such a position. I am looking forward with 
much hope for the day to come, and I believe it is 
not far away, when M. A. C. \^ill offer to those of 
its students who desire it, an opportunity for ad- 
vanced study in agricultural and kindred sciences, 
second to none in the United States, and on a par at 
least with the best to be had in other countries. 
There is a real need for such instruction now. 

But you ask, how would you attempt to fit your- 
self for such a position? If I were to answer such 
a direct question wilhout going too much into details 
my reply would be somewhat as follows : Were I a 
student at M. A. C. and had such an end as the 
one under consideration in view, I would endeavor 
to obtain good training in practical Agriculture. If 
you are a farmer's son you have much to your ad- 
vantage. If not, attempt to familiarize yourself as 
much as possible with practical farming, by spending 
your vacation on good sized farms, operated bj' clear 
headed successful men, who are gaining their liveli- 
hood from the pursuit. Master in a measure at 
least, the details of practical farm management ; 
become a practical farmer. All those who have 
accomplished this would do well, if time and oppor- 
tunity permit, to spend some times on farms where 
a system of special farming is carried on, as for 
example stock-breeding, market gardening, etc. [f 
you have done this, you will have gained a great 
deal of practical information ; you will have com- 
prehended to an extent, the actual condition of 
farm practice and management; you will have made 
great progress to your goal. If by this time you 
have become a graduate of M. A. C. you ought to 
be ready to to take a few years of advanced study 
under the best possible conditions. 

What shall you study and where shall you go? 
These are the questions to be answered. You are 
now certainly iu condition to receive advanced in- 
struction in scientific Agriculture. You must seek 
the ablest men that are to be found, work with them 
and observe how they work. But you cannot be an 
investigator in Agriculture, you cannot get at the 
ground laws governing the science, without a con- 
siderable knowledge of the sciences so closely related 
to it. I think some extra Chemistry would do you 
good. I know you must have had a good 
course in Inorganic Chemistry, but I fear you are 



AGGIE LIFE. 



weak in Organic, and what more especially might 
be termed Phjsiological Chemistry. Good courses 
in lectures on these subjects, together with some 
laboratory practice in what we term Agricultural 
Chemistry, such as milk analysis, fodder analysis, 
fertilizer analysis, would be valuable to you as an 
advanced student. I would not have you spend 
too much time in advanced laboratory practice, but 
some practical work is necessary-, to make you fa- 
miliar with those elements, compounds, and groups 
of compounds with which you will especially have 
to do, as an instructor and investigator. To Botany 
I would devote considerable time. In Systematic 
Botany you are already well grounded I think, but 
you need to know Anatomical Botany or plant 
anatomy, as well as Physiological Botany or the 
laws regulating plant-growth. Here Chemistry and 
Botany as it were join hands, and we must be 
familiar with both sciences. Right here I would 
add that some knowledge of Animal Physiology 
should also be had. In Cryptoganic Botany we 
must familiarize ourselves with the different groups 
and families of fungi, and the different plant dis- 
eases produced by them. A knowledge of Bacteria 
especially those with which we have to do in Agri- 
cultural science and practice, you should also have. 
For example, I would not have you ignorant con- 
cerning the life of the little plant producing alco- 
holic fermentation, and if the bacteria that trans- 
forms this alcohol into active acid, in other words 
with the Chemistry and Physiology of cider and 
vinegar manufacture. Of Geology you certainly 
should have some practical knowledge. You ought 
to be familiar with the principle characteristics of 
the different geological formations, learn to know 
the different soils produced from these formations 
in differ-?nt sections, the causes of the formation of 
springs, etc. Zoology and especially Entomology 
with reference to insects injurious to agricultural 
plants, should be studied, and it would be a most 
excellent idea to have some theoretical instruction, 
and do some practical work in Veterinary Science, 
as well as Mechanics. 

Right here I would say, do not expect to get all 
this knowledge from books. Books are valuable 
aids but such knowledge can only be acquired by 
work in the laboratories with chemical and ph^-si- 
cal apparatus, by work with the microscope, and by 



work and tramps in the open field. Now do not 
understand me to say that you are ignorant of all 
these subjects after having been graduated at our 
college. I have attempted to outline a course of 
study that a person should pursue, to become an 
intelligenc instructor and investigator in Agricultural 
Science. In many or all of the above subjects you 
have had instruction, but in some cases at least, it 
has not been extended enough to give you that 
grasp of the subject you will need in order to carry 
on your future work to best advantage. It would 
not be out of place to add, that it would be wise for 
you while a student at college, to pay special atten- 
tion to the sciences that we have above mentioned. 
In your future study, you must supplement and 
deepen the knowledge you already have. 
Gottingen, August, 1891. 

OUR OBJECT IN LIFE. 

How many beautiful visions pass before the mind 
in a single day, " when the reins are thrown loose, 
and fancy feels no restraint !" How curious and 
interesting would be the history of the workings of 
a single mind for a day ! How many imaginary joys 
and airy castles pass before it which are all destroyed 
before they reagh realization. What one of us has 
not imagined a term more full of honor and joy than 
was ever experienced, or weeks more full of pleasure 
and running over with duties done than ever falls 
to mortal. These may be dreams of the imagina- 
tion, but they are common to the student. 

To those who live for themselves alone, these are all 
which ever come. But great minds have their antic- 
ipations, — not merely the paintings of fancy, but 
realities — which patient thought discovers. Indeed, 
our characters may be tested in part, by our antici- 
pations. If our thoughts are continually shifting 
from one earthly bubble to another, though our 
hopes may be high, it is poor proof of our character. 

AVhat is the outgrowth of these anticipations, 
these daydreams? Does not the fulfillraent of our 
object in life depend upon these? Habits formed 
now remain through life, and as our thoughts now 
are for good or evil, so will be our future influence 
in the world. Everyone should occasionally be 
alone with himself, but at such times it is the great- 
est mistake to allow one's fancy to carry him away 
into impossibilities ; but rather it should be kept 
upon some worthy object of real life. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



The world as a mass of iudividuals has misuuder- 
stood the true object of life. The history of man- 
kind has its pages all stained with blood. Its 
pride and ambition terminates in war and blood 
shed, and in the destruction of all that is good and 
lovely. Look at Xerxes and his five million men ! 
Was there one among that number, from the highest 
to the lowest, who was fulfilling the object for 
which he was created? Again, look at the avarice of 
unscrupled men that has been preying upon the vitals 
of Africa ! Thirty millions of slaves have been kid- 
napped and carried from their native land. Sup- 
pose the same time, money and effort had been 
spent in spreading the arts of civilization, learning 
and religion over the continent of Africa ; what a 
vast amount of good might have been accomplished, 
Are not these and many other examples the direct 
results of perversion of the mind and abuse of the 
intellect ? 

Let us conceive of a young mind with faculties 
equal to Milton. Suppose that this mind, instead 
of evolving sublime verse, had wasted its powers in 
sketching the filthy plots of dime novels ! Would 
not every right minded person deeply regret such 
perverseness? Man was created for purposes high 
and noble. 

Look at various individuals. Here is one whose 
only thought is upon his latest investment; here is 
another whose sole object of life is his exaltation in 
the eyes of the public. Have these a just concep- 
tion of the object of life? Should we waste our time 
dreaming only of selfish plans? Have we not rather 
a dutj" to our fellow men to perform ? And can we 
not do it by fixing our aim at the nobler things of 
this life? 

Emerson says, "All things exist in the man 
tinged with the manners of his soul." If this be so, 
let us train manners and our thoughts so that the 
nobler part of our characters may be developed and 
thus fulfil our true object of life. 



WELCOME, '95! 

"Now Welcome to the Freshman class !" 
The valiant Sophomores cry, 

"We know you are a plucky class, 
We see it in your eye ; 

Examinations sciuelched you not, 
But still you are alive 

And no professor dared to mark 



You less than sixty-five. 
This shows that brains you do not lack, 

For which we give you praise 
[They'll help you on tremendously 

In these, your college days."] 

"They say you can play foot-ball some. 

They tell us you can sing. 
All right, that suits us very well. 

Just make the campus ring 
With Eah ! Rah ! Rah ! for Ninety-five 

Until you all are hoarse. 
But do your best. Old ninety-four 

Will beat you there of course, 
For we're a larger class than you 

And oh, how big we feel ! 
The English language only seems 

Our greatness to conceal. 
And so we try to parlez-vous 

And our importance quench. 
But never mind, you Freshman class 

Can never study French. 

"So welcome now to Ninety-flve, 

We hope you've come to stay, 
We'll help you on as best we can 

In 6Yer:j proper way. 
And next year if you have good luck 

And honest are and true. 
Each member of the Freshman class 

May be a Sophomore too." 



NINETY-FIVE. 

Rah, Rah. Rah, for Ninety-five ! After months 
of idle speculation, during which rumors of all sorts 
were rife concerning this all important body of men, 
authorities and students alike have at last been per- 
mitted to view for the first time this new acquisition 
upon which depends in a great degree the future 
welfare of our college. 

Promptly at the stroke of the bell on the morn- 
ing of the second of September, the class of ninety- 
five marched boldly into the chapel, then and there 
to commence its toilsome journey along the narrow 
path that leadeth into knowledge and a sheep-skin. 
Although surpassed somewhat in numbers bj- its 
predecessors, the Sophomores, it did not appear to 
be in the least dismayed by its inferiority in that 
respect, but seemed determined to hold its own 
whatever might happen. And now that it has be- 
come firmly established on its way there is no doubt 
but that the class of ninety-five will contribute no 
small share to the varying events of college life, and 
will attain certain success in the end. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Gentlemen of the Freshman Class : As you lay 
to-day the foundation for your college course it 
would seem but fitting that we should offer for your 
benefit a few words of advice and encouragement 
which our long experience enables us to give. In 
the first place you should know yourselves. You 
should realize that you represent not only the four 
quarters of this college town, but that your mem- 
bers hail from the length and breadth of this great 
commonwealth of ours. Yea, even more ; from the 
distant isles of the Pacific. Having once acquired 
a thorough knowledge of yourselves you should so 
mould your actions that your example will be worthy 
of imitation by all following classes. 

Take fast bold of Instruction, just as you would 
a ninety-four man in a rush. Learn the equivalents 
of the metric system as you have the multiplication 
table ; study your declensions faithfully ; perform 
your problems if you can, but do not crib ! Woe 
be unto him who is caught at such a practice at the 
M. A. C. ! Always take ten minutes to ascend the 
botanic path to recitation, and likewise take ten 
minutes to descend the same unless it be the last 
hour when you should hasten to the Boarding house 
with all possible speed. Beware of Pelham water 
and the Owl club. Danger lurketh in both. If you 
own a musical instrument for. pity's sake play it in 
the day time and join the band at your earliest op- 
portunity. Join a society of course, but join the 
right one. Be sure of that. Pay your bills prompt- 
ly, especially your subscription to Aggie Life. Do 
your best at the rope pull ; play foot ball ; follow 
your captain ; paddle your own canoe through all 
the Reads and rushes that may grow in your way, 
and you will be sure to "get there." With a part- 
ing injuction to keep on the right side of the faculty 
and to write for your college paper we leave you in 
the tender hands of Fate and ninety four. 



THE GLEE CLUB. 
Promptly after the opening of the term the Glee 
Club held a meeting and unanimously agreed to con- 
tinue the good work began last winter. When first 
formed its future was, like all new undertakings, 
' very uncertain, but all manfully worked together 
and the results shown last commencement were 
more than a recompense for the labor and time ex- 
pended, as everybody was taken by surprise at the 



success. And now this year, under the leadership 
of H. D. Clark '93, and the management of L. W. 
Smith, '93, the Glee Club proposes to continue in 
the same line of improvement. Being for the 
greater part composed of energetic men, its future 
looks like a very bright and prosperous one, and 
one that will be looked on with pride by M. A. C. 
and her friends. 



RECEPTION OF THE SENIORS BY 
PROF. AND MRS. FERNALD. 

On Friday evening last. Prof, and Mrs. Fernald 
most hospitably entertained the members of the 
Senior class. As the recipients of such hospitality 
the Seniors desire to express their appreciation for 
the entertainment they have received, for this the 
second time as the guests of Prof, and Mrs. Fernald. 

Informal association of professor and student is 
the prime factor in the growth of confidence and 
honor of the latter for the former, and in whatever 
way this is brought about such confidence and 
respect are highly essential to the welfare of a 
college. 

As a rule, students while in college have but few 
opportunities for social enjoyment, and by these 
informal receptions they not only become more 
intimately associated with their professors, and with 
each other, but also receive social advantages of the 
benefits of which thej' would otherwise be deprived. 



OFFICERS ELECTED AT THE MASS 
MEETING, SEPT. 4, 1891. 

ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION. 

President, G. E. Taylor 

J. E. Perry 



Secretary and Treasurer, 
1st Director, 
2d " 
3d " 
4th " 



E. Eogers 

F. H. Henderson 

G. 0. Sanford 

G. A. Hubbard 

BASE-BALL ASSOCIATION. 

President, H. E. Crane 

Secretary and Treasurer, G. F. Curley 

1st Director, G. B. Willard 

2d " H. C. Davis 

3d " C. H. Barton 

4th " H. B. Read 

FOOT-BALL ASSOCIATION. 



President, 

Secretary and Treasurer, 

1st Director, 

2d " 

3d 

4th " 



E. Rogers 

J. Baker 

G. B. Willard 

F. H. Henderson 

J. E. GiflFord 

E. F. Dwyer 



AGGIE LIFE. 



READING ROOM ASSOCIATION. 



President, 

Secretary and Treasurer, 

1st Director, 

2d 

3d 

4th 



H. B. Emerson 

F. H. Henderson 

H. M. Thomson 

J. Baker 

A. J. Morse 

E. A. White 



POLO ASSOCIATION. 



President, 

Secretary and Treasurer, 

1st Director, 

2d 

3d 

4th " 



Win. Fletcher 

E. H. Lehnert 

G. B. Willard 

J. R. Perry 

F. I. Parker 

C. M. Dickinson 



TENNIS ASSOCIATION. 

President, C. S. Graham 

Secretary and Treasurer, E. J. Walker 

1st Director. A. T. Beals 

2d " W. H. Ranney 

3d " C. F. Johnson 

4th " S. Karoda 

W. I. BoTNTON, President, 

H. B. Emerson, Secretary. 



DESTRUCTION OF THE MT. PLEASANT 
HOUSE BY FIRE. 

Last Friday morning about 12-45 the beautiful 
buildings of what is known as the Col. Clark place, 
situated on the hill east of ths college were discov- 
ered by the inmates to be on fire. The two build- 
ings burned simultaneously showing clearlv that the 
origin of the fire was incendiary. The alarm was 
given at the college by one of the students, who 
observed the fire at about one o'clock. The hose 
carriage was immediately manned and, preceded 
by nearly every man rooming in the college build- 
ings, was taken to the grounds of the burning house ; 
but owing to the lack of proper hydrants it was 
useless, and even with the means of obtaining water 
the fire had gained such headway that it was beyond 
control. In about an hour nothing was left of either 
house or barn but the chimneys and foundations. 
Three pianos and most of the furniture in the lower 
story were saved by the prompt action of the stu- 
dents, and but for them practically everything would 
have been lost. The horses and herd of Holsteins 
occupying the barn were rescued by members of the 
family. 

The property belonged to W.F. BuUman, formerly 
a practicing physician in Brooklyn, N. Y. The 
families of Dr. Bullman and Lawyer H. C. Nash of 
Amherst and several visitors were in the house at 
the time of the fire, and all escaped uninjured. The 
house was occupied for twenty years by Col. W. S. 
Clark, former president of the college and by him 
was made one of the finest residences in town, and 



^ollc^^ fJot^S- 



GENERAL EXERCISES. 



8-15 A. M., Chapel. 

8-30 A. M., Inspection Rooms, S. 
SENIOK. 
A. M. 

8-30. Mental Science. 



9-30 Agriculture, M. T. Th. 
Military, W. 
Rhetoricals, F. 
10-30 Chemistry, M. T. Th. 
Agriculture, W . 



10-30 Chemistry. 



p. M. 
1-30 Veterinary. 



2-30 

JUXIOE. 
A. M. 

8-30 Mensui-ation, M. T. Th. 

Agriculture, W. 

Market Gardening, F. 
9-30 Zoology, M. T. W. Th. 

Market Gardening, F. 

10-30 Zoology, M. T. Vf. Th. 



11-30 Rhetoric, M. T. W. F. 
Agriculture, Th. 

p. M. 

1-30 Market Gardening, T. 
Rhetoric, Th. 



10-30 A. M., Church, Sunday. 

4-00 p. M., Drill, M. Th. F. 

SOPHOMORE. 

Agriculture, M. Th. F. 
Botany, T. 
French, W. 
Chemistry, M. 
Trigon. or Chem., T. Th. F. 
Agriculture, W. 
Trigon. or Chem., M. 
Botany, Th. 
Agriculture, T. 
English, W. 
Chemistry, F. 
French, M. T. 
Botany, W. P. 
Chemistry, Th. 

Botany, M. 
Chemistry, T. 
French, Th. F. 
Military, 1-2 term, M. 

FEESHMAN. 

Chemistry, M. T. Th. F. 
Latin, W. 

.Algebra, M. W. 
Latin, T. 
Chemistry, Th. 
English. M, F. 
Algebra, T. 
Latin, Th. 
Botany, M. T. 
Algebra, Th. 

English, M. 
Botany, W. Th. F. 



2-30 Market Gardening, M. T. Th. Military, 1-3 term, M. 



the loss of it will be keenly 
the beautiful. 



felt by every lover of 



—"Very skillful." 

— Wanted. — Some one to play the organ. 

— We are to have new goal posts this year. 

— R. E. Smith, '94, carries the mail this term. 

— The Senior class starts for West Point to-night. 

— There was noinspectionof rooms last Saturday, 
Sept. 5. 

— There are more students in college now than 
ever before. 

— The battalion will be organized into four com- 
panies shortly. 

— The band has re-organized under the leadership 
of Mr. Lehnert. 

— A new bam has been erected during the sum- 
mer at the State Experiment Station for storage 
purposes. 



8 



AGGIE LIFE. 



— Prof. Paige has been studying in Montreal 
during the summer. 

— Freshman to Senior : — " Will you please excuse 
me from expection ? " 

— The Junior class is visiting the Horticultural 
fair in Boston to-day. 

— James E. Bardiu, ex-'92, has returned to 
college and entered '93. 

— A. R. Streeter, '94, is now managing the second 
hand furniture business. 

— Benj. Sedgwick, '93, has left college to take a 
position with a civil engineer. 

— There are between seventy and eighty boarders 
at the boarding house this term. 

— J. Austin, '94, has left college to enter upon 
classical studies at Holy Cross. 

— Quite a number of students are unable to obtain 
rooms in the college dormitories. 

— The tennis courts have been put in excellent 
condition and are well patronized. 

— We regret to announce the resignation of Ben- 
jamin Sedgwick from the Life Board. 

— The foot-ball managment is about to purchase 
new well padded pants for the players. 

— The Freshmen are made conspicuous by their ab- 
sence on the foot-ball field. Wake up, '95 ! 

—J. R. Perry, '93, and C. A. Goodrich, '93, 
returned this year with new Columbia safeties. 

— Lieut. L. W. Cornish was one of the judges at 
the prize drill held at Northampton, Labor day. 

— The flag staff has been shortened two feet, 
owing to premature decay, caused by exposure. 

— Trinity wishes to play here on the 18th ; but as 
yet no satisfactory arrangement has been made. 

— The Y. M. C. A. meetings are well attended 
this term. May the interest increase still more. 

— Many of the students, especially those of '95, 
have been ill the past week as a result of Pelham 
water. 

— A person Irom one of the rural districts of 
Mass. wrote recently for a bulletin of the Hatching 
Station. 

— H. D. Clark, '93, has bought out W. H. 
Ranney, '98, and is now prepared to' sell all kinds 
of student supiilies. 



— Sept. 9th the Freshmen and Sophomores con- 
tested for supremacy on the botanic walk. Both 
classes were victorious. 

— Rah, Hix, Rive! R&h, Rix, Rive! Whaekety, 
Wfiack, Whack! Rackety, Rack, Rack! Rack, 
Rack, Rack! Rack, 95! 

— Who is going to win those tennis prizes ? The 
oflScers of the tenuis association are to be congratu- 
lated for their energy and enthusiasm. 

— The class of '95 has challenged the class of '94 
to a lope pull with six men on a side, to occur Oct. 
14 at 5 p. M. The challenge has been accepted. 

— The flower bed laid out by the class of '9 1 looks 
very beautiful just at present, but it is not destined 
to remain so long, if foot-ball is played on the lawn. 

— The following prizes are announced by the 
Tennis Association : Doubles, 1st piize $5.00 in 
gold ; 2nd prize $2.00 ; for singles, 1st prize $3.00. 

— The Freshmen have elected the following offi- 
cers : Pres., F. Dwyer; vice-pres., R. W. Drury ; 
sec. and treas., C. S. Cooley ; class captain, H. B. 
Read. 

— Freshman to crowd : — " I think those foot-ball 
suits are of good color, for when the men are running 
around you can't tell which is the ball and which 
are fellows." 

— Why not begin talking pond now ? Perhaps if 
we do we will have one this winter which will allow 
us a day or two of skating, if only one or two get 
on the ice at a time. 

— The offlcers of the difllerent associations are 
published in another column, with the exception of 
the Owl Club. These our special reporter 
has been unable to obtain. 

— Who says we have not an efficient fire depart- 
ment? Ten minutes after the alarm was given 
the hose carriage was at the fire followed one hour 
later by the local department. 

— Freshman to Prof. Fernald : — "What branch 
do you teach?" 

Prof. Fernald : — " I am professor of Zoijlogy." 

Freshman : — " Oh ! bugs and rocks. Good thing !" 

— The class of '92 elected the following officers at 
the beginning of the term: Pres., W. I. Boynton ; 
vice-pres., E. T. Clark; sec, H. B. Emerson; 
treas., E. B. Holland; foot-ball captain, Elliot 
Rogers ; class captain, H. E. Crane ; historian, G. 
E. Ta\lor. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



— Prof. C. H. Fernald has been studyiug the 
habits of the cranberry insect at (]ape Cod this 
summer, under the direction of the Hatch Experi- 
ment Station and has also acted as scientific adviser 
of the gypsy moth commission. 

— The officers of the boarding club for the term 
are as follows : — Business manager, W. H. Ranney ; 
secretary and treasurer, F. H. Henderson ; 3d di- 
rector, H. M. Thomson ; 4th director, F. I. Par- 
ker ; 5th director, G. F. Curley. 

— The captain and manager of the foot-ball team 
were chosen on the morning of Labor Day. The 
result of the ballot was G. B. Willard captain, and 
H. B. Emerson business manager. J. R. Perry 
was elected captain of the second eleven. 

— The Washington Irving Literary Society met 
Friday evening and elected the following officers : 
President, F. S. Hoyt; vice-president, F.A. Smith ; 
secretary, H. G. Stockwell ; treasurer, C. H. Spaul- 
ding ; 1st director, H. B. Emerson ; 2d director, H.F. 
Staples ; 3d director, C. P. Louusbury. Next Friday 
the society will hold an extemporaneous debate. 

— At the Commencement week meeting of the 
Board of Trustees it was voted that the Committee 
on Course of Study and Faculty be authorized, with 
the approval of the Faculty, to make exceptions to 
the rule of the college which forbids special courses 
when a partial course is desired. 

Voted ; also, that the Committee on Course of 
Study and Faculty be instrusted to confer with 
President Goodell upon the matter of a vacation for 
the president and to express to him the earnest de- 
sire of each member of the Board for the complete 
restoration of his health and that he take time for 
rest and recreation sufficient to ensure a complete 
recovery, and that the time necessary is hereby 
placed at his disposal with a continuance of salary. 

Voted ; that the matter of appointment of an act- 
ing president be referred to the Committee on 
Course of Study and Faculty with full power to 
appoint. 

The Committee on Course of Study and Faculty 
in accordance with the above vote have appointed 
Prof. C. H. Fernald acting president during the 
absence or inability of President Goodell, the pres- 
ident having been granted a vacation, with leave 
of absence until January 1st next, and as much 
longer as his restoration to health may require. 



TWO VIEWS, 

IN THE GYM. 

He was a Freshman, tall and slim 

As Freshmen ought to be, 
And when he practiced in the Gym. 

He was a sight to see. 

His muscles all were hard as iron, 

In strength he did surpass, 
And all declared he'd surely be 

The athlete of his class. 

ON THE CAMPUS. 

Here stands our Freshman proud no more, 
His hopes dashed to the ground ; 

He knows that in at least one thing 
His match he's surely found. 

His postnre tells of agony, 

His face of pained surprise, 
And all because of that one thing, 

That second exercise. 



Hi, pretty Mabel, plump and sweet, 
I watched you walking down the street. 
Sharp the scream and prompt the squeal, 
Yon've slipped upon an orange peel. 

Tears will rise. 

And folks will stare — 

Two ankles twinkle in the air. 



-Outing. 



THE LAKGEST STOCK OF 



Boots, Shoes i Rubbers 

IN TOWN AT 



FRANK G. PLUMB, 

Hair Dressing Rooms, 

COOK'S BLOCK, AMHERST, MASS. 



AMHERST HOUSE 



VERY. 



-a 



i 



u 



STABLE, 



T. L. PAIGE, Prop'r 



HACKS TO AND FROM ALL TEAINS, OMNIBUSES, 

HACKS', DOUBLE AND SINGLE TEAMS 

FURNISHED AT SHORT NOTICE. 

CAREFUL DRIVERS. FAIR PRICES. 

AUcauiRST, MASS. 



10 



AGGIE LIFE. 



FRESHMAN CLASS. 



Edward Oren Bagg, 


West Springfield 


Mass 


Henry Arthur Ballou, 


Swanszea 


N. H 


"Waldo Lewis Bemis, 


Brookfleld, 


Mass 


George Austin Billings, 


So. Deerfleld 


Mass 


William Clay Brown, 


Peabody 


Mass 


W. H. Brown, 


Amherst 


Mass 


Albert Franklin Burgess, 


Rockland, 


Mass 


Edile Hale Clark, 


Spencer 


Mass 


Robert A. Cooley, 


So. Deerfleld, 


Mass 


Charles Winfred Crehore, 


Chicopee, 


Mass 


Forrest Barrett Cutting, 


North Framingham, 


Mass 


Alfred Davis, 


West Roxbury, 


Mass 


Charles Morrison Dickinson, 


Park Ridge, 111 


William Bradi'ord Dodge, 


Boston, 


Mass 


Ralph Willard Drury, 


Athol Center, 


Mass 


Elmer Francis Dwyer, 


Lynn, 


Mass 


Herbert Stockwell Fairbanks, 


Amherst, 


Mass 


Thomas Patrick Foley, 


Natick, 


Mass 


Harold Lock Frost, 


Arlington, 


Mass 


Albert Daniel Hemenway, 


Williams'^'iUe, 


Mass 


Edward Harris Henderson, 


Maiden, 


Mass 


Samuel Francis Howard, 


Wilbraham, 


Mass 


Guy Agustus Hubbard, 


Ashby, 


Mass 


Robert Sharp Jones, 


Dover, 


Mass 


Asa Howard Kimball, 


Melrose Highlands, 


Mass 


Shiro Kuroda, 


Japan 


Clarence Bronson Lane, 


Killingworth, 


Conn 


Jasper Marsh, 


Danvers Centre, 


Mass 


Amos Hall Mason, 


Medfield, 


Mass 


George Henry Merwin, 


Westport, 


Conn 


Walter Levi Morse, 


Middleboro, 


Mass 


Jacob Parker, 


Plymouth, 


Mass 


Henry Blood Read, 


Westford, 


Mass 


Wright Asabel Root, 


Deerfleld, 


Mass 


Salome Verand Sastre, 
Frederick Bridgman Shaw, 
Arthur Bell Smith, 
Clarence Linden Stevens, 
Efford Earle Taylor, 
Frederick Clinton Tobey, 
Enrique Tiuoco Velio, 
Frank Lafayette Warren, 
Percy Loring Weed, 
William Benjamin Wentzell, 
Edward Albert White. 
Roger A. Woodbury, 


New York City 

South Amherst, Mass 

North Hadley, Mass 

Sheffield, Mass 

North Amherst, Mass 

West Stockbrldge, Mass 

San Jose, Costa Rica 

Shirley, Mass 

Boston, Mass 

Amherst, Mass 

Fitchburg, Mass 

Cheshire, Conn 



PRAYER-MEETING TOPICS. 
Sept. 17 — Are you a Christian? Let it be seen! 

I Peter 2 :9 ; Matt. 5 :14-16. E. A. Hawks. 
Sept. 20— Christian Conduct. I Peter 3 :8-17. F. 

W. Smith. 
Sept. 24— Abiding in Christ. John 15 :4-6. J. B. 

Knight. 
Sept. 27 — Growing in Grace. Eph. 4 :13-16 ; Col. 

1:9-11. F. I. Parker. 




Business is business. FRANK WOOD will get up Spreads for 
the Boys this winter. Send your orders right along to get there first. 

Joseph Pariseaij, 

RAZORS HONED. 

Wood's House, Amherst, Mass. 



OFFICE OF 



EDWAED A. THOMAS, 

Fire and Life Insurance Agent. 

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE AND TO LET. 
Office f CooTc-'s JBlockf AmJiei'st, Mass. 



GEO. GRAVES, 



DEALER IN 



D 



AiNTERS' Supplies 

Personal attention given to Frescoing, Decorating 

and Paper Hanging, and all Interior and 

Exterior House Painting. 

Pleasant St,, near L J, Spears Shop. 



AMHERST COLLEGE 

« Co-Operative Steal Laundry ^^^ 

and Carpet Renovating Establislinient, 

Aggie Agent, C. L. BROWN, '94. 

Work taken Monday delivered Wednesday. 
" " Wednesday delivered Saturday. 

OFFICES : 

Kellogg & Stebbins' and Sanderson & Thompson's. 
MRS. H. A UTLEY, J. R. Al BEE, Managers. 






AGGIE LIFE. 



II 



STUDEHSTTS, 

Invite your attention to a carefully selected stock of 

Students' Supplies, 

LAMPS AND LAMP GOODS. 

The highest test Kerosene Oil, Confectionery, 

Fruits and Fancy Groceries. 

|^° CiGAKs, Cigarettes and Tobaccos. „^j 

KELLOGG & STEBBINS, 

MERCHANTS EOW. 



HeNRY stacK.man, 

Watches, Clocks and Jewelry. 

Repairing Neatly and Promptly Done. 



PHOENIX EOW, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



■"! 



Fli ITAL AND FAIENCE LAMPS 

B. & H. AND ROCHESTER, $3.00. VERY HAND 
SOME DUPLEX, $2.00, $2.50 AND $3.00. 

For Fine Fruit, Confectionery and Fancy Buiscuit go to 

o. @. c^ 



¥ 



DBALEK IN 



WSTGfiES, GIiOGSfS, JEW EliR 

FINE POCKET CUTLEUY, SILVER AND 

PLATED WARE, OPTICAL GOODS, 

CANES, SPORTING AND 

FANCY GOODS, 

GOLD Pens, Fine Stationery. 

REPAIRING NEATLY ANO PROMPTLY DOfJE. 

AMHERST, MASS. 



H,0, P 



H 



H 




A.i«a:i3:ES,ST, 



IVEJ^SS. 



umnS IMot^s. 



Mr. E. E. Flint, '87, who is at present studying 
in Germany, is spending a portion of his vacation 
in company with his family traveling in Europe. 

J. B. Lindsey, '83, received the degree of Doctor 
of Philosophy last Juue and was offered the position 
of assistant to Prof. Leibscher, director of the Ag- 
ricultural Institute, but refused, accepting the posi- 
tion of assistant to Prof. Lehmann director of the 
Agricultural Experiment Station. He will remain 
in Gottingen until spring and will probably remain 
in Europe until July, 1892. 

W. C. Paige, '91, enters the Junior class at Cor- 
nell this fall. 

H. M. Howard, '91, is market gardening in 
Winchester. 

Murray' Ruggles, '91, will enter the Thomson 
Houston Electric Light works at Lynn this fall. 

H. N. Legate, '91, has been appointed second 
clerk in the office of the State Board of Agriculture 
under rules prescribed by the Civil Service Commis- 
sion. F. H. Fowler, '87, holds the position of 
first clerk. 

D wight L. Hubbard, '89, has a position in the 
City Engineer's office. City Hall, Boston. 

Claude A. Magill, '91 has entered the service of 
Boston & Maine R. R. in engineering work. His 
address is 15 Cedar St., Maiden, Mass. 

Owing to the death of his father F. 0. Williams, 
'90, has resigned his position as assistant agricul- 
turist at the Hatch Experiment Station. 

H. J. Field, '91, has accepted the position as 
assistant Agriculturist at the Hatch Experiment 
Station. 

MARRIAGES AMONG M. A. G. GRADUATES. 

Firmino da Siiva Torelly, '87, to Albertina de 
Soza Pinto, Oct. 2, 1890, at Rio Grande do Sul,. 
Brazil. 

Lorenzo Foster Kinney, '88, to Helen May Wells, 
July 9, 1891, at Kingston, R. I. 

Burt; Laws Hartwell, '89, to May Louise Smith, 
Sept. 9, 1891, at Stowe, Mass. 

Wednesday, Jul\' 29th — married at Lowell, Charles 
L. Marshall, '87, and Miss Louise M. Huntley, both 
of Lowell. 



12 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Sheet Miasic, 



JVEusic BookSa 



Strings 

FOR -the: violin, banjo, aUITAR, 

AT 

CUSHMAN'S MUSIC STORE, 

a.:is<i:h:be.st. 

EDWIN NELSON, 

Books and Stationery, 

Next door to Post Office, 
AMHERST, MASS. 



Hair Dressing Rooms. 

Razors Honed, and Shaving Supplies always 
on hand. 

FERD. FANEU F, 

AMHERST, MASS. 



m^txBt Mouse, 



o 

AMHEKST, MASS. 



The undersigned is pleased to announce 
to his former patrons and others desiring 
Game Spreads or Dinners, that he is always 
prepared to accommodate (at shoii; notice) 
large or small parties. 

Ample dining room capacity for 200 peo- 
ple. 

LORENZO CHASE, Prop'R. 



..^DENTISTS. 5)., 

C. S. G-ATES, D. D. S. 
T. G. HUl^TINGTON, D. D. S. 

CVTLMWS BIjOCK, AMBMRST, MASS. 



OFFICE HOUBS: 
9 A.. 1^/L. TO S F. 1^/L. 

Ether and Nitrous Oxide administered when desired. 



(Drugs, Medicines, 

TOILET ARTICLES, 

CONFECTIONERY, CIGARS, CIGARETTES AND 

SMOKERS' GOODS. 



PM-rSICIANS' PB.ESCR1PTI0SS C AME FVIjIj'r 
COMPO VNDUD, 

AT 

MORGAN'S PHARMACY, 

6 PHCENIX KOW. 

Order your COAIi here. 



Go to BLODGETT & CLAEK for 
CLOTHES or FURNISHING GOODS. 

They keep the best line and use the 
students well. 

Take your laundry to them Monday or 
Wednesday morning and you will get 
good work. 

BLODGETT & CLARK. 



JOHN MULLEN, 



-DEALER IN- 



MEATS AND PROVISIONS, 

VEGETABLES OE ALL KINDS IN SEASON, EISH AND 

OYSTERS, FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC FRUITS 

AND CANNED GOODS. 

Palmer's Block, Main Street. 

E. Pv. BENNETT, 
Jeweler, 

Optician, 

Watchmaker. 

FINE GOODS ! LOW PRICES ! 

GOOD WORK WARRANTED. 

First Door from. Post Office. 



WHERE DO YOU BOY m\ 

Meerschaum Pipes? 

French Briar Pipes? 

Choice Tobacco? 

Sponges? 

Soap? 

Hair Briislies from 25 cts. up? 

Combs from 5 cts. up? 

Choice New Yorlc Confectiouery? 

Shaving Mugs? 

Shaving Soap? 

Lather Bruslies? 

Cigarettes, fresh every two \\-eelis? 

Tlie Best Soda in America? 

The Best Bay Rum? 

Imported Perf nmes? 

Prescriptions prepared by licensed pharmacists? 

Imported Domestic Tooth Brushes? 

If you have not obtained tliese necessaries at DEUEL'S 
DRUG STORE, you have begun wrong. Deuel's is the 
leading Drug Store in Western Mass., and keeps the 
largest assortment of goods at Ijottom prices. 



DEUEL'S DIG STORE, 



Amtierst House Block, 



Ainiierst, Mass, 



NO. 1 COOK'S BLOCK, - - AMHERST, MASS. 

Pure Drugs and Medicines, 

FAJSTCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, IMPORTED AND 

DOMESTIC CIGARS, CIGARETTES, ETC., 

MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, FISHING 

TACKLE AND SPORTING GOODS, 

Sletallic Cartridges for Pistols, and Sporting and Springfield Killes. 

SundaA' and night calls responded to at residen'^.e, first door west 
ol Wood''s Hotel. 

1S50. ILO^^EILiL. 1S31. 
PHOTOGRAPHS 

ENLARGEMENTS 

■■ IN SILVER OR PLATINUM. 
FINISH IN CRAYON, INK OR PASTEL. 

LANTERN SLIDES 

FOR OIL OR LIME LIGHT, MADE TO ORDER. 

PRINTS AND LANTERN SLIDES FROM AMATEUR 

NEGATIVES A SPECIALTY. 
AMUHRST, - - - 3TASS. 



^. g. Dl(?KlC<gOCl, D. D. g. 

DENTAL ROOMS. 
WILLIAMS' BLOCK, - AMHERST, MASS. 



Office Hours, 9 to 12 a. m., 1-30 to 5 p. 



8@=°-Ether and Nitrous Oxide Gas administered wlien 
desired. • 



-A-T THE 



AMHERST GASH SH9E STBRE 

You can get the most for your money. 

BOOTS AND SHOES, RUBBERS, OVERSHOES, SLIP- 
PERS, TRUNKS, AND BAGS. 



REPAIRINGNEATLY DONE. 

JAMES E. STIISTSO:^, 

CASH ROW, AMHERST, MASS. 



ALF^E^ GLY.NJI, 



Repairing A^eatly Done. 

Cleaning and Pressing a Specialty. 

Repairing Taken by the Alontli or 

Quarter at Special 

Prices. 

ilLITiSRY S0IT8 AND TRIMiNGS, 

AMERICAN HOUSE BLOCK, 
AMHEMST, - . MASS. 



Massachusetts Agricultural College, 




JVinlierst, Aj;«-ss. 



(£ /^A^r^^-i^'^-i^ 




VOL. II. 



AMHERST, MASS., SEPTEMBER 30, 1891. 



NO. 2. 



*ER1MTERS,* 



AMHERST, 



MASS. 



MASS, AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, 

Botanical Department, 

AWHERST, MASS. 

"VVe would inform the friends of the college, and the 
pul^lic generally, that we are prepared to supply 
FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES ANP SHRUBS, 
SMALL ERUITS AND PLANTS, 

trne to name, also 

CUT FLOWERS AND DESIGNS, 

all at the lowest price. 

For Trees, Plants, Shrubs, Flowers and Small Fruits, address. 



C, H, SANDERSON & CO,, 



CASH DEALERS IN 



FINE CLOTHING. 

Hats, Caps, Umbrellas, and Gents' 
Furnishing Goods. 



CASH EOW^ 



AMHERST. 



S/NDEiiso^ k Thompson 



CASH DEALERS IN 



Prof. S. T. Maynard, 



AMHERST. MASS. 



I? 



THE ABltlEliST 

PHE >ND GAB 



D 



irn 



A complete line of goods suited to the students' wants. 

BEDSTEADS, MATTRESSES, PILLOWS, STUDY 
DESKS AND CHAIRS, LOUNGES. 



DRY AND FANCY GOODS, 

HOSIERY, RIBBONS, AND SMALL 
WARES OF ALL KINDS. 



AMHERST, 



MASS. 



BOOTS AND SHOKS 



FOB EVERYBODY. 



A FINE LINE OF STUDENTS' 

DRESS SHOES, IN PATENT LEATHER, BALS. AND 
CONGRESS. A FULL LINE OF 

ZSTTBBEI^ O-OOIDS. 
FOOT-BALL SHOES AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



K,BFA.IE,Ii;rO- IJOISTB F'K.OlvII'TX.Tr. 



WINDOW SHADES, DRAPERIES, 



CARPETS, RUGS, ETC., ETC. 



All Goods STRICTLY CASH and at 
LOWEST PRICES. 

E. D. MA.IISH, 



10 PHCENIX ROW, 



AMHERST, MASS. 



T, V\^. SLOAN, 

S FBCBNIX JtOW. 



J, M, WAITE k SON, - 
HATTERS AND FURRIERS, 

AND DEALERS IN 

HATS, CAPS, FURS, TRUNKS, BAGS, FURNISHING GOODS. 

Latest Stj'les iu Furnishings. Agent for Knox's 
aud Youman's Hats. Sole Agent for Pittsfield 
Laundrj'. 

Hats Repaired. Furs Renovated. 

Give us a call before purchasing'. 
NO, 5 !> IKE NIX HOW, - ^MHJBItST, MASS, 



AGGIE LIFE. 



VOL. TI. 



AMHERST, MASS., SEPTEMBER 30, 1891. 



No. 2 



AGGIE LIFE. 



Published Fortnightly by the Students of the Mass. 
Agricultural College. 



Terms $1,00 per year, in advance- 



Single copies, 10c- 



Entered at the Post Office as second-clase mail matter. 



BOARD OF EDITORS: 

11. E- CRANE, '92, Editor-in-Chief, 
G. B- WILLAKD, '92, Business Manager, 
G. E. TAYLOE, '92, K- H. SMITH, '92, 

G. F.<;UK1,EY, '93, C. E. HOWARD. '93, 

C. F. WALKER, '94. 

Please address all communications to the Business Manager. 



tV^?^U-^t^ V, UW\V.tl\i=.\. ?^\U-^t^S. 



Cda'^rlaLls. 



The tennis tournament this vear has thus far 
proved a marked success, and great credit is due 
the directors for their efforts iu its behalf. Although 
the prizes awarded were by no means large, the 
interest has been manifestly great, and there is no 
doubt that the practice gained has benefited not 
only the general standing of the game in college, 
but also the excellence of individual playing. Com- 
petition is one of the prime factors of any line of 
improvement, and it would be well if there were 
more of it iu some branches of college work as well 
as in athletics. 



It again becomes our misfortune to say a word 
in regard to the Reading-room. No sooner had the 
papers appeared at the beginning of the term, when 
those little items relating to our college wer=; 
observed to be missing. VVe sincerely hope that 
after all has been said, that no upper classman 
would do such a contemptible thing, as to steal the 
news from his fellow students, and for the benefit 
of those who have just entered, we will say that the 
papers are for the benefit and improvement of us 



all. and no one student should take the liberty 
to encroach upon the rights of his fellow stu- 
dents, for the spirit shown is one of meanness 
and selfishness and will not be tolerated by the 
majority of students. 



We had not deemed it advisable previous to this 
time to comment upon the merits of our foot-ball 
teams but after our first game we feel justified in 
saying just a word of encouragement. It had been 
conjectured by many that our team was much infer- 
ior to those of previous years and naturally enough 
our first game was watched with interest. Last 
year Trinity beat ns 30 to 0, and this year with a 
stronger team only 16 to 0. If our first game was 
any criterion to judge by we certainly gave a very 
creditable exhibition of foot-ball considering the 
short time we have here for practice and it reflects 
credit upon our captain for the rigid course of 
training that he has maintained. May the interest 
increase and with it we may reasonably look for- 
ward to a successful season. 



When foot-ball is receiving its share of the 
interest from the students this term, while this 
game is, and ought to be, receiving the proper 
financial support, would it not be a fine idea for 
those base-ball players not caring for foot-ball to 
keep in practice for the team next spring? In for- 
mer years it has been the custom here for base-ball 
to be entirely out of existence in the fall term, and 
the sight of a league ball on the campus was a 
sufHcieut cause to bring out exclamations of disgust 
from the student body. This is not the proper 
spirit to be shown. A little practice regularly in 
this line would not detract from the interest mani- 
fested toward the more popular foot-ball. Perhaps 
men playing on the eleven should expend all their 
spare energy iu that game alone. But outside of 
the team, there are several men who might be 



14 



AGGIE LIFE. 



getting in some valuable training. And, while con- 
sidering tlie matter, why should not the base-ball 
captain be elected now? True, it would be a matter 
of three months before he would be chosen, follow- 
ing out the custom of previous years, but those 
three months would give him ample time to pick 
out available material for the following spring, and 
work in the winter could be entered upon with more 
snap than in the past. 



dents and authorities confidently expect great im- 
provements from the introduction of electives, and 
of other changes which it is proposed to make as 
soon as the funds recentl}- granted by Congress can 
be secured. 



While no doubt the Freshmen and some who 
have been here longer than the '95 men, think that 
the tax and subscription fiend has done his work 
pretty thoroughly, there is one subscription that 
must not be slighted, and that is the foot-ball sub- 
scription. We have the elements of a good team 
this fall, and with practice it will be strong, but no 
matter how good a team may be, it is impossible to 
carry it on without a solid financial backing. Not 
having enclosed grounds we cauuot depend to any 
large extent upon gate receipts, so the money for the 
support of the team must come from the students. 
You all enjoy watching the games, and aside from 
the enjoyment, the factor of college pride should be 
a stimulus to liberal giving. The boys did well in 
this matter last year, so let us not fall behind 
what we did then, but go ahead of it, as we are 
stronger in numbers now than then. The treasurer 
will soon be around, so be ready for him. 



During the past week the Senior class debated 
on the following question : — Is the gain sufficient to 
compensate the loss in requiring of the Senior class 
more than eighteen hours per week work in the 
recitation room? The class voted unanimously that 
the gain did not compensate the loss. This 
question is of interest not only to the Senior class, 
but to every class in college. Every student has a 
certain amount of time at his disposal. During the 
time spent in the recitation room the greater part of 
the work is done by the professor, while during the 
hours outside of recitation each student must work 
for himself. The duty of the professor is to help 
tlie student, but not to do all the work for him. 
The amount of work the student does for himself 
measures the benefit he gets from his college course. 
Although as at present constituted, our course of 
study involves some evils, nevertheless, both stu- 



We hope to be pardoned for forcing the attention 
of our readers to subjects alreadv discussed, but it 
seems to us there is one subject, the importance of 
which, justifies us in repeating. We refer to the 
custom of some colleges in which members of the 
Faculty give short talks to the student body on the 
current topics of the day. In colleges where this 
plan has been adopted, usuallj' an hour, more or 
less, per week is spent by some members of the 
Faculty in setting forth and explaining, from an 
unbiased standpoint, topics of vital importance, 
whether political, social or economic. The object 
of the college is to so train and educate its students, 
that when they have completed their course and 
earned their diploma, they shall be fitted to take 
their places as loyal citizens of their native state, — 
not merely as laymen, but as leaders — for who shall 
direct the affairs of the state if not the educated 
men? But do the educated, in the popular sense of 
the word, always possess a thorough knowledge of the 
social and economic questions of the day? With- 
out doubt, in many cases they do not. What facil- 
ities have our students for acquiring this knowledge? 
You answer that the library and reading rooms 
abound in literature upon all such subjects. But 
with the amount of class-room work required, does 
the average student find time to carefully peruse, 
make comparisons of, and draw conclusions from 
the multitudinous articles upon popular topics found 
in current literature? Moreover, is the average 
student mind capable of forming correct opinions, 
unaffected by inherited notions? In both cases the 
answer must be, no ! Again, in the case of some 
students, unless their attention is called to such 
subjects, and their interest awakened in them, they 
would never take the pains to inform themselves 
upon what may be of prime importance to them in 
after life. Only by talks and lectures, before the 
students as a body, can these questions be brought 
to the thought of each individual student, while bj' 
these means, without infringing upou the regular 
curriculum, it would become a source of knowledge. 



AGGIE LIFE. 



15 



yielding great good to eacli student, who, without it, 
may lose one of the objects of living — that of 
working for his fellow men. With those who have 
the interest of the college at heart rests the outcome 
of this appeal. What shall it be? 



^orvtribu-tcd. 



WHAT SHALL I DO ? 
By Dr. J. B. Lindsey, '83. 

PART II. 

Having considered the subject as to what we 
should study, the next question is, as to where we 
should study to accomplish our end in view. Re- 
garding this matter there might be some difference 
of opinion, and advice cannot be given to govern all 
cases. Thus in some of the sciences mentioned, 
suflBcient advanced instruction can be had at our own 
college, while in others this opportunity does not at 
present present itself. It has been my object while 
in Germany to make somewhat of a study of Ger- 
man agricultural education. I have personally 
visited the leading institutions both in Germany and 
Switzerland. Of the condition of agricultural edu- 
cation in France and England am at present ignorant, 
but from what little I have read, I cannot believe it 
is equal to that given in several of the German 
universities. After a young man had completed his 
course at M. A. C, I think I should very strongly 
advise him to come to Europe for a few years, if a 
possible thing, and spend at least a portion of his 
time, perhaps all, at one or more of the German 
universities. Do not understand by this that I am 
*' German crazy," as I think many of my fellow- 
countrymen are, over Germany and her institutions 
If you could point me out a better place to accom- 
plish our end, I would say instantly, go there by all 
means. All agricultural institutions for advanced 
study in Germany are simply parts or departments 
of the universities. 

Whether it would be advisable for you to study at 
more than one university, is a question you would 
have to decide after having been here for a time ; it 
would also depend on the time you could remain. 
The time you ought to spend would of course de- 
pend on your previous instruction, and the money 
at your command. I venture to sav it would be a 



wise investment of time and money, if you devoted 
three years to it, and two years, if three were not 
possible, while even one year so spent would be very 
greatly to j'our advantage. 

If I were asked to name the university, I think I 
should say without hesitating, go to Halle. At the 
head of the agricultural department is Professor 
Julius Kiihn, a man who is considered without any 
question to be the father of agricultural education 
in Germany. I spent a number of days at this in- 
stitution in trying to get a correct idea of its 
method of instruction, its workings, etc., and, to my 
mind, it approached nearer to my ideal of what such 
an institution should be, than anything I had before 
seen. Prof. Kiihn himself, I found to be a most 
interestiug man, and ready to give any information 
possible. The one disadvantage is, that Prof. Kiihn 
is rather old, and will probably ere long be succeeded 
by a younger man The Univeisity of Halle offers 
excellent instruction in agricultural and general 
Chemistry, Botany, Geology, etc. The Agricultural 
Institute with its collections (rather crowded at 
present for want of room) has a large garden in con- 
nection, for purposes of instruction, with small plots 
of a great many standard varieties of vegetables, 
grains, etc. ; also an animal garden, as it is called, 
containing stalls for a great many kinds and varie- 
ties of domestic animals, as well as a fine collection 
of wild animals, obtained from different countries 
and from which our domestic breeds are supposed 
to have been developed. One notices here also a 
veterinary department in full operation, where ani- 
mals of the city and surrounding country are treated 
at a trifling cost, as well as a creamery, machine 
hall, etc. Not far from the Institute is the farm of 
nearly 300 acres, largely under cultivation. A por- 
tion of this farm is purely devoted to the carrying 
on of experimental research, while the remainder is 
planted with those crops which are to be fed directly 
to the animals. 

It seems to me that a young man who could spend 
a few years in earnest work at such an institution, 
where eveiy facility is offered for advanced instruc- 
tion, could not fail to be greatly benefited, and fitted 
to do work in the future that would be of permanent 
value. Among other agricultural institutions in 
Germany, I might mention the one at Gottingen 
under the direction of Prof. Liebscher, and the one 



i6 



AGGIE LIFE, 



at Leipsig of which Prof. Kirschner is director. At 
present I hardly thiuk they offer as many advantages 
all things considered, as the one at Halle. 

Again, there are many other advantages to be 
gained by spending a few years in study in a foreign 
country. You come into connection with another 
civilization, and are brought into close contact with 
its thought and learn new methods of work. Your 
ideas and thoughts will be broadened ; you will see, 
as it were, with new eyes. You will learn a new 
language, become acquainted with its literature re- 
lating to Agriculture and the kindred sciences, so 
rich, so valuable ; and if you are to be an investiga- 
tor, you must certainly know what has been done 
in other countries and especially Germany, if you 
would experiment without much waste of time and 
lack of results. The one thing that many of our 
agricultural institutions lack to-day is properly and 
sufHciently educated men as instructors and investi- 
gators. May the day soon come when such a lack 
will no longer exist, and when our young men will 
not be obliged to spend so much time in a foreign 
land, to get the best that is to be had. 

Do not be at all discouraged at the apparent 
mountain before you. A few jears of earnest work 
and you will have removed it. Remember, young 
men, that nothing of worth is accomplished in this 
world except as a result of real, earnest, painstaking 
hard work. 

Having accomplished the course as above out- 
lined, you will return, I believe, no less of a loyal 
American. You will have seen another or perhaps 
other civilizations, and have become a partaker of 
the riches they have to give, but you will also come 
to see jour own country in a clearer light, and to 
love it with a nearer and dearer love, and be a more 
devoted supporter of its institutions than ever 
before. 

If this imperfect presentation of a subject that is 
so intensely interesting to the writer, shall induce 
any young man to give it thoughtful consideration, 
the writer will be amply repaid. 

G-ottingen, August, 1891. 



HIGHER USEFULNESS A DUTY. 
The kinds of uses are as various as the kinds of 
occupation. Some are high, some are low, while 
others come in between. 



There are plenty of men in the world who can 
perform the lower uses, who can do well in the 
simpler occupations, but the demand for men to go 
up higher will always be urgent. It is the plain 
duty of every man to fit himself to be useful, and 
always to aspire and work for higher usefulness. 

Am I useful, and how can I gain the ability to be 
more useful, are questions that force themselves 
into the mind at some point in life. And always- 
after them come the answers, perform the present 
duty and study to improve thyself for the discharge 
of higher duties, and thus become more useful. 
Such thoughts and desires lend young men to the 
academy and college. They lead him to observe. 

It is estimated that not one per cent, of the 
images thrown upon the retina are ever perceived 
by the mind. Now, in order to become more useful, 
we must observe more fully and accurately and 
reason upon the causes of the effects we see. 

A scientific course such as we pursue at the M. 
A. C. teaches us to observe and fits us for greater 
usefulness. It gives ys a chance to know what has 
been observed in different lives. It leads us to see 
that observation and reasoning act together to pro- 
duce science. This course opens up many lines of 
work, and certainly in some of these each will see 
his path of duty, his chance for greater usefulness. 

A college should not be expected to fit men for 
professions, that is the work of technical and profes- 
sional schools. To show young men the lines of 
occupation in which students and workers are 
needed, to instill a love for knowledge, and to teach 
methods of acquirement is the work of a college 
course. It is the work which our college is doing, 
and doing well. The love of knowledge leads to a 
desire for greater usefulness, which latter is the 
motive that brought us here. Thinking and reason- 
ing on our own observations prepares us to trace 
efllects to their logical causes. It is our duty to so 
cultivate and use all those faculties which are given 
us, that we may be more useful to our country and 
our fellowmen. 

Habits of temperance and prudence, of truthful- 
ness and loyalty will aid us. Temperance keeps 
man from excesses. Prudence makes him careful, 
thoughtful and wise. It keeps him out of the com- 
pany of those who are not honest, respectable 
orderly and agreeable. Prudence leads one to be 



AGGIE LIFE. 



17 



careful of the health of his body, as in the perform- 
ance of many uses a sound body is indispensable. 
It gives him the power of influence, for it keeps him 
from folly. Truthfulness and loyalty have been the 
qualities of all statesmen dear to our country. 

The man who is accurate, economical and indus- 
trious is prepared for work of a higher grade than 
he who is careless, extravagant, wasteful or sloth- 
ful. The course of study in this college tends 
to make young men more careful, practical and dili- 
gent. Work will always tell and men of minor 
talents will ever be found in places of honor, simply 
because of their greater industry and ability to use 
the talents they have. 

Industry and earnest work are duties which 
strengthen and invigorate the powers of body and 
mind. Men of ecouomj- and good judgment are 
always in demand to guide the '' ship of state" and 
the " wheels of trade." We can and should fit 
•ourselves to supply this demand. Every man is the 
architect of his own fortune and should endeavor to 
acquire the ability to perform the higher uses in 
society. A college course aids in gaining that 
ability. 



THE ORCHESTRA. 



Monday evening, Sept. 28, a meeting of those 
interested in forming an orchestra was called. 
Seven musicians attended and each seemed quite 
enthusiastic on the subject. Several selections 
were played and the results were certainly encour- 
aging, showing that if the proper spirit is put into 
this matter there is no reason why vie cannot have 
a good orchestra. The members are fair players 
individually, so all that is needed is its work together 
to bring about the end desired. As material to begin 
with, we have two violins, a cornet, clarionet, trom- 
bone, flute and bass violin. If practice is kept up, 
meetings being held once or twice a week, by the 
beginning of the winter term there is no doubt but 
M. A. C. will have a very creditable orchestra. 



FROM MY STUDY WINDOW. 

I wonder how many of my fellow students are 
awake to the beauties of nature which surround us 
on all sides as we pursue our daily toils. Can any 
student stand for five minutes at his studv window 



and not be impressed with the beauties that sur- 
round him? In the east rises Mount Pleasant with 
its evergreen foliage and the white clouds rising 
over its summit ; to the north grand old Mount 
Toby, towering above its mates like some fabled 
giant of ancient times, with its younger brother 
Sugar Loaf to the west ; to the south, the justly cel- 
ebrated Holyoke range with its abrupt ascents, lying 
there like a fortress to defend the peaceful valley at 
its foot ; and the view to the west : Can a more 
beautiful scene be found anywhere in grand old New 
England? 

President Gates has said : "Thousands go every 
year to view the beauties of Alpine scenery and the 
wonders of the Rhine, but nowhere on God's green 
earth can a more beautiful, a more peaceful and at 
the same time a more sublime scene be found than 
our own Holyoke range with the Connecticut flowing 
at its base through fertile fields and past pleasant 
homes." 

It is too true of us Americans that we do not 
realize the beauties of our own land and the grand- 
eur of our immediate surroundings. God has laid 
our path mid pleasant scenes, and he must be blind 
indeed who cannot see at least seme of the beauties 
which are falling upon his sight every day that he 
spends in his pleasant college home. Often the 
morning breaks dull and dismal, with the heavy 
river fog shutting off his view beyond a radius of 
a few feet, but the sun rises, and little by little the 
mist clears away. At first he is able to see only the 
masses of clouds rolling away ; then by slow degrees 
the outline of the mountains become visible, till all 
at once the sun breaks out bathing the mountain 
cops and valleys with the sunlight and our grand 
mountains stand out with all the purple splendor of 
their western elevation. 

Look about you boys, and while you admire the 
beauty of places that you see in your travels, do not 
forget the scenes that are spread about us in our 
own Connecticut valley. 



^There was a young man from Chicago, 

"Who wanted to see a buzz saw go ; 

Then he put down his face, — 

Too near to the place 

And the doctor said "where did his jaw go?" 

— Exchange, 



i8 



AGGIE LIFE. 



SITTING OUT UPON THE CAMPUS. 
I sit upon the Campus, 

And breathe the evening air : 
I sit upon the Campus, 
Because I have no chair. 

A sweet girl sits beside me. 
The reason is implied, 

A sweet girl sits beside me. 
Because I'm by her side. 

I ask her if she loves me, 
Dearest of all her beaux : 

I ask her if she loves me, 
Because I know she knows. 

She says she wi